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INDEX TO ACCOMPANYING PAPERS.

Alabama, 81–86.

Arizona, 318.
Constitution of, provision for educa- Organization of Territory, 318.
tion, 81.

No schools worth mentioning, 318.
Number of schools established in, 81. School law of 1867, features of, 318.
Opposition to education in, 81.

Duties of school officers, 318.
Poll tax in, 81.

Lack of information regarding schools,
Opposition to appointment of trustees 318.
in, 81.

Arkansas, 86, 87.
Normal schools, 81.

Board of education, 86.
Classes established, 82.

Commissioners of school fund, 86.
State University, 82.

Want of funds; hostility to free
Medical college, 82.

schools, 86.
Law school at Montgomery, 82.

Statistics of schools, 86.
Institution for the Deaf, Dumb, and Institute for Deaf Mutes, 86.
Blind, 82.

Peabody fund, 87.
School finances, 83.

School prospects brightening, 87.
School attendance, 83.

List of State officers, 87.
Lesson of the decades, 83.

Circuit superintendents, 87.
Peabody fund, 83.

Australia, education in, 381-383.
Schools for colored children, 84.

Request for exchange of documents,
Incompetent teachers of, 84.

381.
Normal classes for, 84.

Summary of educational statistics, 381.
Statistics of schools for colored child- Remarks concerying statistics and at-
ren, 84, 85.

tendance, 381, 382.
Colored teachers, 85.

Aid to destitute children, 382.
Statistical table, by counties, 85, 86. Proportion of destitute children among
List of school officers, 85, 86.

different denominations, 382.
African children, exclusion of, 89. Direct gain to teachers by destitute
Alaska, 336, 337.

children, 382.
Area and population of, 336.

School books, 383.
Different races in, 336.

Evening schools, 383.
Extract from Mr. W. H. Dall's “Alaska Training of teachers, 383.
and its Resources,” 336.

Salaries augmented by results, 383.
American University:

Pupil teachers, 383.
Report upon the need for, 418-420.

Surveillance of teachers, 383.
Comparison of American and foreign Austria, education in, 380, 381.
universities, 419.

Educational advancement, 380.
Inferiority of American institutions, National compulsory education, 380,
419.

381.
Government provision for schools of Bengal, India, education in, 377-380.

agriculture and the mechanic arts, Increased number of schools since
420.

1855, 378.
Names of committee reporting, 221. Statistics of expenditure on English
Argentine Republic:

education, 378.
Progress of education in, 370, 371.

Dissatisfaction at the allotment of
President Sarmiento's efforts, 370, 371. educational funds, 378, 379.
Activity of the Department in estab- Extracts from speeches reported in the
lishing schools, 370.

Hindoo Patriot of July 1870, 379, 380.
Coöperation of the provinces, 370. California, 87-97.
Statistical returns of education by Statistics, 87.
provinces, 371.

Establishment of school fund, 88.
Number of children out of school, 371. First free public school, 88.
Proportion of immigrants who cannot Organization of school board in San
read, 371.

Francisco, 88.
Normal schools, 371.

Revision of school law, 88.
Evening schocls, 371.

First State report issued, 88.
Infant, or Kindergarten schools, 371. First bequest to school fund, 88.
Subsidies granted during the year for First State teachers' convention, 88.
education, 371.

First State institute, 88.

California-Continued.

Establishment of "California Teach-

er," 88.

State school law, 88, 89.
Board of education composed of, 88.
Duties of State superintendent, 88, 89.
Duties of county superintendents, 88.
Exclusion of races from schools, 89.
Teachers' certificates, 89.
Taxes for schools, 89.
School fund composed of, 89.
State Normal School, 89.

Statistics of, (table.)
Graded certificates given, 89.
Cosmopolitan schools, 90.
Evening schools, 90.
State Industrial School, 90.

Management of, 90.
Institution for Deaf, Dumb, aud Blind,

90.
University college, 90.
State University, 90, 91.

Resolution admitting ladies into, 91.
Santa Clara College, 91.
University of the Pacific, 91.
St. Mary's College, 91.
Pacitic Methodist College, 91.
St. Vincent's College, 91.
St. Augustine College, 91.
Laurel Hall Boarding School, 91.
San Rafael College, 91.
St. Ignatius College, 92.
University School, 92.
Union College, 92.
Sonoma College, 92.
San Francisco, 92, 93.

City superintendent, 92.
Statistical suunmary, 92.
Policy of renting school buildings,

92.
Non-attendance, 93.
Stringent truant laws needed, 93.
Improvement in evening schools, 93.
Commercial class, 93.
School for Chinese, 93.
Proportion of tax paid by Chinese,

93.
Colored school, 93.
Co-education of the sexes, opinion

of Hon. John Swett, 93, 94.
Separation of sexes in school, 94, 95.
Teaching as profession, 95.
Women teachers, 95.
Statistics by counties, 96, 97.
Names of county superintendents, 96,

97.

State superintendent, 96.
Chinese migration, 422-434.

Numbers of Chinese immigrants, 422.
Character of immigrants, 423.
Their universal ability to read and

write, 423.
Location of the immigrants in this

country, 423.
Chinese companies, 423.
Prospective increase of immigration,

423.
Hinderances to immigration.
Causes of infanticide, 4:24.
Demand for labor in America, 424.

Chinese migration-Continued.

Adaptation of the Chinese to the West,

425.
Checks to immigration, 425.
Government action, 425.
Atrocities of the coolie trade, 425.
Wise and humane legislation, 426.
Convention between the Chinese and

other nations, 426.
Thirteenth and fourteenth amend.

ments as affecting Chinese, 426.
Opening of Chinese ports for trade,

426.
Chinese preference for America, 426.
The principle of no caste, 426.
Political bearings of Chinese immi-

gration, 426, 427.
Sympathy of the Chinese with our in-

stitutions, 427.
Industrial opposition to immigration,

427.
Danger from introduction of pagan-

ism, 427.
Susceptibility of the Chinese to Chris-

tian teaching, 428.
Results of Chinese immigration, 428,

429.
Particulars of policy to be pursued,

429.
Adoption of American language, dress,

habits, and homes, 429.
Predominant characteristics of Chi-

nese; isolation to be deprecated,

429, 430.
Adoption of American manners, 430.
Admission to citizenship, 430.
Importance of education, 430.
Importance of right popular senti-

ment, 430.
Generosity the highest wisdom, 431.
Lessons of history in regard to com-

petitive labor, 431.
Availability of an educational policy,

431.
The Chinese accustomed to acquire

knowledge, 431.
Eagerness to learn the American lan-
Scarcity of schools for Chinese, 431.
Importance of training the children,

431, 432.
Great importance of understanding

our language, 432.
Difficulties in acquiring it, 432.
Text-books adapted to the Chinese,

433.
Educational instrumentalities, 433.
Duty of the Government, 433, 434.
Fruits of experience in education of

Chinamen, 434.
Religious and philanthropic efforts,

434.

Evening schools, 434.
Colorado, 318, 319.

Organization of Territory.
Little information received of schools

in, 318.
Letter from superintendent, 318.
Letter from citizen of Trinidad, 318

319.

guage, 431.

Colorado Continued.

Deaf and Dumb-Continned.
Hope for better times, 319.

Success of students in academic course,
Natural division of the Territory, 319. 373.
Mestizoes, 319.

Employments of graduates, 373.
Colored schools under supervision of Freed- Neglect of instruction of deaf and
men's Bureau, 337-339.

dumb in certain States, 372.
Improvement of the colored people, Delaware, 103-105.
337.

No report issued by, 103.
Statistical summary of day, night, and Absence of school supervision, 103.
Sunday schools, 337, 338.

Opinions of educators in the State,
Panctuality, and attendance, 338.

103.
Normal schools for colored teachers, Proportion of illiterates in the State,
338.

103.
Amount paid by freedmen for schools, Taxation for schools optional, 103.
338.

Petition of colored people to legisla-
Expenditures, 339.

ture, 103.
Connecticut, 98–102.

Schools in Milford, 103.
First public school in, 98.

Abstract of school laws, 104.
Early enactments respecting schools, Wilmington, 104, 105.
98.

Establishment of public schools in, 104.
Summary of statistics, 98, 99.

Superiority of lady teachers, 104.
Free schools not connected with State, Statistical summary, 104, 105.
99.

State Normal University, 105.
Libraries, 99.

District of Columbia, 312-317.
Teachers' institutes, 99.

School organizations in, 312.
State Normal School, 99.

Washington, division of, for school
Soldiers' Orphans' Home, 99.

purposes, 312.
State Industrial School for Girls, 99. Dūties of school officers, 312.
Fitch's Home for Soldiers' Orphans, 99.
Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 99.
Sheffield Scientific School, 99.

School 312.

age;

ons for graded and evening
New Haven.

City superintendent, 312.
Summary of statistics of, 99, 100.

Schools and teachers, 312.
Board of education, 99.

German language and music, 312.
Graded schools, 100.

Seats and pupils, 312.
Training schools for teachers, 100.

Appropriations, 312.
Free evening school, 100.

Joint resolution of the city councils,
Drawing in all the schools, 100.

312.
Vocal music, 100.

Colored schools of Washington and
Hartford.

Georgetown, 312.
Statistical summary,
100.

Superintendent Newton's statement
Norwich.

of, 312.
Statistics of, 100.

Private schools, 312
List of names of acting visitors of State, J. Russell Barr's statement of, 314.
100, 101.

Summary of white school statistics,
Statistics by counties, 102.

314.
Secretary of board of education, 100. Condition of school buildings, 314.
Dakota, 319, 320.

Taxation for schools, 314.
Organization of Territory.

Congressional donations, 314, 315.
Report of superintendent under new Statistics by wards of white and col-
school law, 319.

ored children in city, 315.
Partial summary of school statistics, Georgetown schools, statistics of, 315.
319.

Report of board of guardians, 315, 316.
Lack of school teachers, 319.

Short time pupils remain in school,
Increase of school fund, 319.

315, 316.
Appreciation of schools by the people, Expenditures and school buildings,
319.

316.
Improvement of school-houses, 320. Schools of Washington County, 316.
School law, features of, 320.

Under control of seven intelligent in-
Addresses of State and county super- habitants, 316.
intendents, 320.

Education compulsory, 316.
Statistical details by counties, 320. Statistics of, during the past five years,
Deaf and dumb, education of, 371-373.

317.
Recognition of their right to instruc Ecuador, education in, 383, 384.
tion, 371, 372.

Defective nniversity and college edu-
System in the United States, 372.

cation, 383.
German or articulating method, 372. Method of study in the common schools,
Columbia Institute at Washington,

384.
372, 373.

Newspapers, 384.

sans, 444,

Education and labor, relations of, 439–467. | Educational conventions-Continued.

Austria, technical and scientific American normal association, 407-408.
schools in, 440.

The human body a study for the
Bohemia, technical schools in, 440.

teacher, 408.
Hungary, trade and industrial schools American institute of instruction,
in, 440.

409-410.
Bavaria, polytechnic, scientific, and Poetry of education, 409.
industrial schools in, 440, 441.

Education in Prussia, 409.
Prussia, technical schools in, 441.

The Bible in schools, 409, 410.
Saxony, technical and polytechnic Compulsory school attendance, 410.
schools in, 441.

Central college association, 410-411.
Switzerland, technical and polytech- What colleges ought to be, 411.
nic schools in, 441, 442.

Christian education, 411.
Belgium, commercial and technical Resolution to correspond with the
schools in, 442.

Bureau of Education, 411.
Italy, technical education in, 442.

Kansas State teachers' association, 411.
Northern Europe, technical and scien- Ohio State teachers' association, 411,
tific education in, 442.

412.
France, technical education in, 442, Normal schools and county super-
443.

vision, 412.
Great Britain, increase of technical Moral culture in common schools, 412.
education in, 443, 444.

Utility of the ideal, 412.
Great Britain, interest of workingmen The Bible in schools, 412.
in technical education, 443, 444.

Michigan association of county super-
Great Britain, coöperative societies in,

intendents' 412-414.
444.

Relations of the National Govern-
French exposition and English arti-

ment to education, 412, 413.

Superintendents' records, 413.
Creuzot, technical training in, 445.

School discipline, 413.
Belgian educators, Congress of, 445.

County teachers''institutes, 413.
Art instruction, influence of, 445.

Compulsory attendance, 414.
Factory system, dangers of, 445, 446. Motive powers of our educational
Indian Orchard Mill, schools at, 446.

machinery, 414.
Di Lyon Playfair, remarks of, 446, Michigan State teachers' association,
447.

414, 415.
Cirnlar of inquiry by Commissioner, School discipline, 414.
49.

Indiana State collegiate association,
Amoint, character, &c., of labor, 448, 415.
454 458, 461, 463, 465.

Wisconsin teachers' association, 415.
Geneal effect of education on labor, Virginia educational meeting of
448,452, 458, 461, 463, 465.

county superintendents, 415.
Effect of rudimentary education, 449, Advantages of education, 415.
453, 159, 463, 466.

Prussia an example of, 415.
Effect & further knowledge, 449, 454, New York State teachers' association,
459, 41, 464, 466.

416.
Specific influence of education on in- Inadequate pay of lady teachers, 416.

vention, &c., 450, 459, 462, 464, 466. Iniproved methods in education, 416.
Choice beween educated and ignorant School discipline, 416.

laborers 450, 456, 460, 462, 564, 466. California State teachers' institute,
Choice between educated and ignorant

416, 417.
foremen, &c., 451, 456, 460, 462, 465, Importance of education, 416.
466.

High character of teachers, 416, 417.
Effect of nental culture on morals, Drawing and music, 417.

habits, &., 451, 457, 460, 562, 465, Corporal punishment, 417.
466.

Illustrations in teaching, 417.
Answers by employers, 448–452, 461- Connecticut State teachers' associ-
463.

atim, 418.
Answers by vorkmen, 452-458, 463– England, educational progress in, 373–377.
465.

Great advances made since 1869, 373.
Answers by observers, 458-461, 465– Governmental supervision of schools,
467.

373, 374.
Educational convertions, 406–418.

Endowed schools, 374.
National teachers' association, 406, 407. School laws, 374-377.
National university, 406.

Council of education, 374.
Universal system of weights and Truancy, 374.
measures, 406.

Compulsory attendance, 374.
Primary educadon, 406.

Definition of the public school, 375.
National education, 406, 407.

How schools are to be supplied, 375.
Music in schools, 407.

Duties of school boards, 375, 376.
School discipline 407.

Constitution of school boards, 376.

England-Continued.

Union schools, 376.
School income, expenses, &c., 376, 377.
School returns, 377.
Attendance, 377.

Parliamentary grants, 377.
Florida, 105-108.

Organization of schools in, 105.
Free schools becoming popular, 106.
Aid received from Government, 106.
School and seminary lands, 106.
Agricultural college lands, 106.
Peabody fund, 106.
East Florida seminary:

Statistics of, 106.
West Florida seminary:

Statistics of, 106.
Tuition in abolished, 106.
Statistical summary, 107.
Statistics by counties, 108.

Names of school officers, 108.
Georgia, 108–110.

Peabody fund, 108.
Difficulties to the establishment of

free schools, 109.
Plan proposed, 109.
Early bistory of education in, 109.
“Poor-school law” system, 110.
State school commissioner, Col. J. R.

Lewis, 110.
German schools and German teaching, 437.

German-American schools, 437.
Centralization, without destroying

liberty, 437.
German-American Teachers' Associa-

tion, 438.
Resolutions of, 438.
German language in the public

schools, 438, 439.
Objections to considered, 438.

Necessity for, 439.
Hebrew education, 359-370.

Universal education of, 359.
History of, 360.
First biblical mention of, 360.
Constant progression of, 360.
Derived from laws of Moses, 360.
Expulsion from Jerusalem, 360.
Preservation of Talmuds, 360.
Conquest of Mohammed, 360.
Mild rule of caliphs, 360.
Theocratic constitution, 360.
Inculcation of virtues, 360.
Instruction in the Mishna and Gemara,

361.
Mnemonics, 361.
Education the aim of life, 361.
Adam the first schoolmaster, 361.
The first inention of writing, 361.
The schools of the prophets, 361.
Founded by Samuel, 361.
Men of the Great Assembly, 361.
Schools of the sopherim or scribes, 361.
Translation of the septuagint, 361.
School founded at Tiberias, 361.
Compilation of the Mishna, 361.
Babylonian schools, 361.
Completion of Babylonian Talmud,

361.
Sufferings of Hebrew schools, 361.

Hebrew education-Continued.

Schools of Otranto and Bari, 361.
Prosperity of schools in Spain, 361.
Encouragement of Moorish kings, 361.
Maimonides, the philosopher, 361.
Murder of Jews at Seville, 362.
Terrible condition of Jews in Ger-

many, 362.
Banishment from Spain, France, and

England, 362.
Exclusive talmudic schools, 362.
Six post biblical developments, 362.
Allusions to Mr. Parton, 362, 365.
Liberal Constitution of the United

States, 362.
Sympathy of Jews with American Rev.

olution, 362.
Mordecai M. Noah, an American Jew,

363.
American asylum attempted to be

founded for Jews, 363.
Reasons for failure of, 363.
Charity the first aim of Hebrew edu-

cation, 363.
Incidents of Hebrew charity, 363.
The mitzvah, or honor, 363.
Help the stranger, 363.
Hermetic charity, 363.
The cardinal virtues taught, 364.
Appreciation of Plato's idea, 364.
Effect of American education, 34.
Allusion to Aristotle, 364.
The true aim of education, 364.
Prayers for the President and others,

364.
Resolutions of Dr. Lilientha', 364.
The reform idea-note, 364.
Jewish poverty explained, 564.
Habitual temperance of Jews, 364.
Rare exhibitions of crime accounted

for, 365.
Why Jewish poverty is not seen, 365.
Notable absence of inanit, 365.
Remarkable exhibition o female chas-

tity, 365.
Explanation of same, 35.
Gratitude an educatioral trait, 365.
Reverence for George Washington, 365.
Profanity especially forbidden, 365.
Honor thy father and thy mother, 365.
Respect to parents, 335.
Education in the Hebrew language,

366.
The mystic rite of nanhood, 366.
The use of Hebrew in writing, 366.
Superiority of Helrew education, 366.
This the cause of their remarkable

preservation, 316.
The happiness of Jews in America,

367.
They are wandeers no more, 367.
Names of emirent Jewish scholars,

367.
Historical fact in North Carolina, 367.
Hebrews hold official stations, 367.
Their confidence in American securi-

ties, 367.
Frightful picture of present condition

in Rome, :67.
Schools in the United States, 368.

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