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Hebrew education-Continued.

Sunday-schools in the United States,

368.
The Temple Immanuel in New York,

368.
Rules of Sunday-schools in general,

368.
Rev. George Jacobs, of Philadelphia,

368.
Statistics of Philadelphia, 368.
Statistics of Boston, 368.
Rev. S. Deutsch, of Baltimore, 369.
Statistics of Baltimore, 369.
Rev. Dr. Sonnerschein, of St. Louis,

369.
Statistics of St. Louis, 369.
Rules of St. Louis Sabbath-school,

369.
Rev. B. Felsenthal, of Chicago, 370.
Statistics of Chicago, 370.
Rev. Isaac M. Wise, of Cincinnati, 370.
Statistics of Cincinnati, 370.

J. J. Noah, 370.
Idaho, 321, 322.

Organization of Territory, 321.
Summary of school statistics of, 321.
Indifference of the people regarding

education, 321.
Recommendation of superintendent,

321.
County superintendents alive to the

cause, 321.
What is most needed, 321.
Reversal by the Territory of United

States law setting apart land for

schools, 321.
Addresses of State and county super-

intendents, 322.

Statistical details by counties, 322.
Illinois, 110-122.

Statistical summary, 110.
School revenues, 110.
Increase of school revenues, 111.
Calculation of averages and statis-

tics, 111.
Magnitude of the school work of the

State, 111.
Attendance, 111.
Districts, 111, 112.
Private schools, 112.
Graded schools, 112.
Colored schools, 112, 113.
Association of county superintend-

ents, 113.
County teachers' institute, 113.
State teachers' institute, 113.
Sonthern Illinois teachers' associa-

tion, 113.
State teachers' association, 113.
County normal schools, 113.
“Illinois Teacher," 114.
State certificates, 114.
Illinois State normal university, 114,

115.
Illinois industrial university, 115.
Illinois soldiers' college, 115.
Illinois soldiers orphans' home, 115.
State reform school, 115.
Institution for the education of the

blind, 115.

Illinois-Continued.

Institution for the Education of the

Deaf and Dumb, 115, 116.
Justitution for Idiots and Feeble.

minded Children, 116.
Illinois State Hospital for the Insane,

116.
Private institutions of learning, 116,

117.
Educational Department at Washing-

ton, necessity for, 117.
Indian children, exclusion of, 89, 212.
Chicago:
Growth of city and of schools during

last ten years, 117.
Corporal punishment in schools, 117.
Bible in schools, 117.
Natural history in primary schools,

117.
Summary of statistics, 118.
Improvement in methods of teaching,

118.
Music in the schools, 118.
Teachers' institutes, 118.
Normal department of high-school,

118.
Evening schools, 119.
Special funds, 119.
Statistics by counties, 120.
Names of county superintendents, 120.
State superintendent, 120.

Table of statistical details, 120-122.
Illiteracy in the United States, 467-502.

Earliest official data of, 467
General results of national census, 467.
Illiteracy not confined to foreigners or

negroes, 467.
Illiteracy a wide-spread national ca-

lamity, 468.
Census of 1840, and effect on publiq

mind, 468.
Interest and action in Virginia, 468.
Census of 1850 and 1860, 469.

Causes and remedies, 501.
Tables compiled from national census:

I. Illiterate whites in 1840, 470.
II. Illiteracy in 1850 and 1860, 472.

Whites, free colored, native, foreign.

Male and female excess of ratio.
III. Per cent. of illiterate in 1830 and

1860, 474.
Whites, native and foreign; colored,

free and slave; idiotic, insane, blind,

and deaf.
IV. Illiterate, 20 to 21 years old, with

per cent., 480.
V. Per cent. of illiterate whites in

1840, 481.
VI. Statistics of 1840, with per ceat.,

495.
Birds-eye views of maps of illiteracy:

1. Illiterate whites in 1840, 483.
2. Illiterate wbites in 1850, 484.
3. Illiterate whites in 1860, 485.
4. Illiterate whites, male and female,

1860, 488.
5. Illiterate whites, male and female,

1860, 489.
6. Ratio of male and female illiter.

ates, 1860, 490.

Birds-eye views of maps of illiteracy: Indian education-Continued.
7. Ratio of male and female illit- Desire of the Sioux for education, 342.
eracy, 1860, 491.

Indians in Kansas and Nebraska, 342.
8. Illiteracy of the freedmen, 493, 494. Progress of schools in Sioux Mission,
9. Aggregate illiteracy of the United 342, 343.
States in 1860, 497.

Sacs and Foses, 343.
10. Per cent. of aggregate illiteracy, Ottoes and Missouri Indians, 343.
1840–50, 498.

Pawnee manual labor school, 343.
11. Per cent. of aggregate illiteracy, Kickapoos, 343.
1850-'60, 499.

Pottawatomies' Catholic mission, 343.
12. Per cent. of aggregate illiteracy, Sacs and Foxes of the Mississippi, 343.
1840-'60, 500.

Munsees, 343.
Indiana, 123–127.

Kaws want a mission school, 343.
Summary of statistics of, 123,

Plain Indians, 343.
State fund, 123.

Shawnees, 343.
Colored citizens taxed but not educa- Indian Territory, Indians in, 343, 344.
ted, 123.

Cherokee schools, statistics of, 343,
State University, 123, 124.

344.
Indiana Asbury University, 124.

Choctaws and Chickasaws, 343, 344.
Wabash College, 124.

General school organization, 343, 344.
Northwestern Christian University, Progress in Seminole schools, 344.
124.

Chippewas in Minnesota, Wisconsin,
Earlham College, 124.

and Michigan, 344.
Union Christian College, 124.

Manual labor school for the Pillagers,
Brookville College, 124, 125.

344.
Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Lako Superior Chippewas, 345.
125.

Wisconsin Stockbridges, 345.
Indiana State Institute for Education Oneidas in Wisconsin, 345.
of Blind, 125.

New York Indians, 345.
Reform School at Plainfield, 125.

Alaska Indians, 345.
Education in State prisons, 125.

Report of Vincent Colyer, 345.
Indianapolis:

Indians in British North America, 346.
Statistical sammary of, 126.

Statistical summary of Indian schools,
Attendance, 126.

347.
Evening schools, 126.

Table of trust funds, 347.
Instruction in German, 126.

Religions societies, expenditures of, for
Colored children, 127.

education of Indians, 347.
Private scbools, 127.

Table of statistical details of Indian
Training schools, 126, 127.

education, 348–352.
Statistical tables by counties, 127, Statement of liabilities of the United
130.

States for educational purposes, as
Names of superintendents, 127-130.

per treaty stipulations, 353, 354.
State superintendent, 127.

Indian Territory, area of, 339.
Indian Education, 339–348.

Iowa, 131-139.
Duty of General Government, 339. Summary of statistics, 131.
Indians Pacific coast, 340.

Abstract of school law, 131.
Schools of, and educational condition School fund, 131.
in, 340.

Need for normal school, 132.
Indians of Arizona, 340.

Musical training, 132.
New Mexico, 340.

Evening schools, 132.
Peaceful and warlike tribes, 340.

Institutions of learning not public,
Lack of schools and other advan-

132.
tages, 340.

Statistical table by counties, 133, 139.
Moquis Indians, 340.

Names of county superintendents, 136,
Mohaves, desire of, for schools, 440.

139.
Pueblos ask for schools, 340.

State superintendent, 136.
Testimony of secretary of peace com- Kansas, 140-146.
mission, 340, 341.

Graded schools, 140.
Report of Lieutenant Ford, 341.

Improvement of school-houses, 140.
Recommendations of Agent Dennison, Need for dictionaries, 140.
341.

Uniformity in text-books, 140.
Indians of mountain Territories, 341. District treasurers, 140.
Desire for schools among, 341.

Teachers' institutes, 140.
Nez Percés, advanced condition of, 341. School fund, investment of, 140.
Idabo Indians, desire of, for schools, School lands, mismanagement of, 141.
341.

School lands, inisappropriation of, 141.
General Sully's testimony, 341.

Statistical summary, 141.
Recommendation to establish agricul- State Normal School, 141, 142.
tural school, 342.

State University, 142.
Dakota Indians, no schools, 342.

State Agricultural College, 142.

Kansas-Continued.

Maine-Continued.
Asylum for the Blind, 143.

Policy in reference to teachers, 154.
Denominational institutions, 143.

Bangor, general statistics of, 154.
Teaching a profession, 143.

Roll of honor, 154.
Names of county superintendents, 144. Discontinuance of public school ex-
State superintendent, 144.

aminations, 154.
Statistics by counties, 144-146.

Statistical details by counties, 155.
Kentucky, 147-149.

State superintendent, 155.
Struggle for reform in school law, 147. County supervisors, names of, 155.
Opposition by the legislature, 147. Maryland, 156-164.
Inefficiency of old law, 147.

School law of 1865.
Provision for colored schools, 147.

Imperfection of schools prior to its
Misappropriation of taxes paid by col- adoption, 156.
ored people, 147.

Improvement first year under new
List of school officers, 148, 149.

system, 156.
Superintendent, 148.

Increase of children attending school
Kindergarten culture, 354-359.

during 1866, 156.
Importance of correct methods in Establishment of State normal schooi,
teaching, 354, 355.

157.
System in Germany, 355.

Colored schools, 157.
Superficial imitations of Kindergar- Statistical summary, 157.
tens in America, 355.

Existing school system, 157.
Fundamental point of difference be- Insufficient salaries of teachers, 157,

tween Fræbel's method and that of Irregular attendance, 158.
other educators, 355.

Compulsory law, 158.
How he utilizes the principle of evil State Normal School, 158.
in children, 356.

Taxes of colored people, 158.
Where he found his model, 356.

Education of colored children in Bal
Necessity to the children of play, 356. timore, 158.
Fræbel's method, 356, 357.

St. Johu's College, statistics of, 158.
Work done by a class of children in Maryland Agricultural College, 158.
Dresden, 358.

Baltimore Female College, 158.
Quickening and harmonizing effects of Statistical summary, 159.
music, 358.

Finances, 159.
Necessity for competent teachers, 358. Maryland Institute for the Instruction
Kindergarten school in Berlin, 358.

of the Blind, 159, 160.
Importance of adhering to the princi- Baltimore, general view of the system
ples of Fræbel, 359.

in, 160, 161.
Kindergarten normal school in Bos- Baltimore City College, 161.
ton, 359,

Female high schools, 161.
Kindergarten school for education of Eastern Female High School, 161.
colored nurses, 359.

Western Female High School, 161.
Louisiana, 150–152.

Peabody prizes, 161.
Organization under new school law, Primary schools, 162.
150.

Lower studies, 102.
Portions of law impracticable, 150.

Grammar schools, 162.
Insufficient funds, 150.

Evening schools, 162.
Çompulsory mixed schools, 150.

Colored schools, 162.
Mismanagement of school lands, 150. Punishments, 162.
Portion of fund lost, 150.

School-houses, 162.
Parish treasurers fail to report, 150.

Salaries, 162.
Normal schools needed, 150.

Supervision, 162.
Normal school at New Orleans, 150.

Statistics of schools in Baltimore,
Aid rendered by Freedmen's Bureau,

163.
150.

Statistics by counties, 164.
Refusal of New Orleans city board to Massachusetts, 165–184.
comply with law, 150.

Area of, 165.
Louisiana State Seminary, 150.

Population, 165.
Peabody fund, 150.

Obligation to sustain schools, 165.
Statistical details by parishes, 151, Educated brain, 165.
152.

Origin of public school system, 163.
State superiutendent, 151.

Establishment of Harvard College, 165.
Maine, 153-155.

Law of the colony in 1642, 165.
General statistics, 153.

Proportion of children in public schools
Normal schools, 153.

in 1832, 165.
County teachers' institutes, 153.

Permanent fund established, 165, 166.
State school fund, 153.

Normal schools : Framingham, West-
Compulsory attendance, 153.

field, Bridgewater, Salem, 166.
Portland, general statistics of, 154. Institution for Deaf Mutes, 166.
City school committee, 154.

General statistics, 166.

Massachusetts-Continued.

Drawing in the public schools, 167.
Boston, summary of statistics of schools

in, 167.
Vocal and physical culture, 167.
Phonic system of teaching reading,

167.
Text-books free to all, 168.
Schools for licensed minors, 168.
Truancy, 168.
Latin school, 168.
English high school, 168.
Girls' high and normal schools, 168,

169.
Highlands High School, 169.
Dorcbester High School, 169.
Roxbury Latin School, 169.
Horticultural School for Women,

169.
Woburn, general summary of statistics

of, 169, 170.
Improved methods in primary

schools, 170.
Requirements for admission to

grades, 170.
Fall River, general statistics of, 170.

Evening school, 170.
Truants, 170.

Half-time schools, 170.
Lowell, general summary of statistics

of, 170, 171.
Free evening schools, 171.
Decrease of truancy, 171.
Report of Truant Commissioner

Huse, 171.
Charlestown, general statistics of, 171.
Worcester, general statistics of, 171.

School committee, 171.
Want of normal school, 171.
Inditference of parents to punctual

attendance, 171.
Truant school, its influence, 171.

Training school, 171, 172.
Dennis, general statistics of, 172.

Lack of apparatus, 172.

Smallness of wages, 172.
Springfield, general statistics of, 172.

Traiving school for teachers, 172.
Free evening schools, 172.
Trnant school, 172.
Reform school for children, 172.

Half-time school, 172.
Northampton, general statistics of

schools of, 173.
Increasing interest among teachers,

173.
Salem, general statistics of, 173.

School committee, 173.

Truancy, 173.
Special school for factory children, 174.
Epigrammatic sentences, 174, 182.
Superintendents of cities and towns,

182.

Statistical details by counties, 183, 184.
Medical education in the United States,

384-396.
Condition of, at present, 385, 386.

Preliminary training, 385.
Professional instruction, 385, 386.
Graduation, 386.

Medical education Continued.

Degrees, 386.

Post-graduate course, 386.
Contrasted with that in Europe, 337,

392.
Austria, 390, 391.
France, 390.
Great Britain, 391, 392.

Italy, 390.
Instrumentalities for-

Private instruction, 385.

Medical colleges, 385-390.
Of women, 392, 393.
Profession, the, 384, 385, 393, 396.
Duty of, toward medical education,

393-396.
Number of, 384.
Organization of, 384, 385.
Relation of, to the Government,

384.
Reputation of, 384.
Students, the, 385, 386, 395, 396.
Impatience of, under instruction,

395, 396.
Percentage of, college-bred, 385.
Perplexities of, 385, 386.

Preliminary acquirements of, 385.
Suggestions as to, 393, 396.

Preliminary training, 393, 394.
Lecture courses, 394.
Methods of teaching, 394, 395.
Clinical instruction, 395.
Drawing, 393.
Moot-courts, 395.
Suits for malpractice, 393, 395.
Thoroughness of, demanded by public,

396.
Michigan, 185–193.

Summary of school statistics, 185.
Abolition of the rate bill, 185.
Advantages of free school system, 185.
Graded schools, 185.
Teachers' institutes, 185.
University of Michigan, 185, 186.

Women admitted, 186.
State Normal School, 186.
State Agricultural College, 186, 187.
Kalamazoo College, 187.
Albion College, 187.
Olivet College, 187.
State Reform School, 187.
Exclusion from of lads under ten years,

187.
Detroit, general school statistics of,

187, 188.
Demand for school accommodations,

188.
Seats forfeited by absence, 188.

Colored children in schools, 188.
Grand Rapids, summary of statistics

of, 188.
Results for ten years, 188.

Interest in education, 188.
Names of county superintendents, 189.
State superintendent, 189.
Table of school statistics by counties,

190-193.
Minnesota, 194-199.

Statistical summary of, 194.
School fund, 194.

196.

Minnesota-Continued.

Missouri-Continued.
Decrease of non-attendance, 194.

Evening schools, 206.
Educational agencies, 194.

Instruction in German, 206.
Teachers' institutes, 194.

School for colored children, 206.
State convention of county superin-

Normal school, 207.
tendents, 194.

High school, 207.
State teachers' institute.

Public school library, 207.
First State normal school, 195.

Educational power of the Press, 207.
Increase in number of male pupils, Necessity of education to State and
195.

county, 207, 208.
Occupations of parents of pupils, 195. Divinity of teacher's work, 208.
Second State normal school, 195, 196. Names of school officers, State and
Third State normal school, 196.

county superintendents, 208-210.
Disparity in number of sexes of pupils, Statistical details by counties, 210,211.

Negroes, exclusion of, 212.
University of Minnesota, statistics of, Non-attendance, causes of, 95.
196.

Montana, 323–325.
Institution open to all, 196.

Organization of Territory, monster
State Institution for Deaf and Duinb proportions of, 323.
and Blind, 1996.

Inadequacy of school system, 323.
State Reform School, 196.

Necessity felt for a permanent school
Other educational institutions, 196, fund, 323.
197.

Partisan legislation in school matters,
St. Paul, statistical summary of, 197.

324.
No truancy nor absenteeism, 197.

Addresses of State and County su
Graded schools, 197.

perintendents, 325.
Names of school officers, State and Statistical details by counties, 325.

county superintendents, 198. Nebraska, 212.

School statistics by counties, 198, 199. Failure by the Bureau to procure in-
Mississippi, 200, 201.

formation, 212.
Provisions of constitution for educa- No reply received to communications,
tion, 200.

212.
School system, 200.

Superintendent of public instruction,
School districts, 200.

212.
State superintendent, 200.

Nevada, 212–214.
County superintendents, 200.

Average school term, and teachers'
School directors, 200, 201.
University of Mississippi, 201.

School fund, 212.
Normal school, 201.

Board of public instruction, 212.
State superintendent, 201.

Exclusion of races, 212.
Missouri, 201-211.

Need for colored schools, 212.
Statistical summary of, 201, 202.

Summary of statistics, 212, 213.
Schools for colored children, 202.

Names of State and county superinten-
Prejudice against disappearing, 202.

dents, 213.
Normal school for colored teachers, 202. Statistical details by counties, 214.
Development of the school system,202. New Hampshire, 215-220.
Character of the teachers, 202.

Summary of statistics for 1809 and
District directors, 202.

1870, 215.
Pay of county superintendents, 202. Remedy for non-attendance, 215.
Teachers' institutes, 202, 203.

Teachers' institutes, 215.
Aid received from the Press, 203.

Lectures, 215, 216.
Mismanagement of school fund, 203. Decrease of number of children, 216.
Schools and railways, 203.

Decrease in “different" teachers, 216.
State University, 203, 204.

Investment in brains, 216.
Lincoln Institute, 204.

Advantages of institute instruction,
Endowment of, by colored soldiers,204. 216.
Missouri Institute for the Blind, 204. Decrease in money expended for
North Missouri Normal School, 205.

schools, 216.
Missouri Asylum for Deaf and Dumb, Increase in value of school-houses and
205.

lots, 216.
Other institutions not fostered by Higher institutions of learning, 216.
State, 204, 205.

Dartmouth College, 216, 217.
St. Louis, origin of public school sys- Chandler scientific department of,
tem of, 205.

217.
Summary of statistics of, 205, 206.

College of Agriculture and Mechanic
Management of the schools, 206.

Arts, 217.
School revenues, sources derived Manchester, general school statistics
from, 206.

of, 217.
Attendance, improvement of, 206.

Training school, 217.
Graded schools, economy of, 206.

Improvement of teachers, 217.

wages, 212.

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