The lives of the most eminent English poets; with critical observations on their works, Հատոր 3

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Էջ 96 - The style of Dryden is capricious and varied, that of Pope is cautious and uniform ; Dryden obeys the motions of his own mind, Pope constrains his mind to his own rules of composition.
Էջ 105 - Soft is the strain when zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse rough verse should like the torrent roar. When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw, The line too labours, and the words move slow : Not so when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main.
Էջ 304 - For letting down the golden chain from high, He drew his audience upward to the sky...
Էջ 19 - O'er the dark trees a yellower verdure shed, And tip with silver every mountain's head ; Then shine the vales, the rocks in prospect rise, A flood of glory bursts from all the skies : The conscious swains, rejoicing in the sight, Eye the blue vault, and bless the useful light.
Էջ 138 - Unblaru'd through life, lamented in thy end, These are thy honours ! not that here thy bust Is mix'd with heroes, or with kings thy dust ; But that the Worthy and the Good shall say, Striking their pensive bosoms — Here lies GAY...
Էջ 121 - Between Roman images and English manners, there will be an irreconcileable dissimilitude, and the work will be generally uncouth and partycoloured ; neither original nor translated, neither ancient nor modern.* Pope had, in proportions very nicely adjusted to each other, all the qualities that constitute genius.
Էջ 137 - A poet, blest beyond the poet's fate, Whom Heaven kept sacred from the proud and great: Foe to loud praise, and friend to learned ease, Content with science in the vale of peace. Calmly he look'd on either life, and here Saw nothing to regret, or there to fear ; From nature's temperate feast rose satisfied, Thank'd Heaven that he had lived, and that he died.
Էջ 132 - Thy reliques, Rowe, to this fair urn we trust, And sacred, place by Dryden's awful dust; Beneath a rude and nameless stone he lies, To which thy tomb shall guide inquiring eyes.
Էջ 346 - Perhaps he was the most learned man in Europe. He was equally acquainted with the elegant and profound parts of science, aud that not superficially but thoroughly. He knew every branch of history, both natural and civil ; had read all the original historians of England, France, and Italy ; and was a great antiquarian. Criticism, metaphysics, morals, politics, made a principal part of his study ; voyages and travels of all sorts were his favourite amusements ; and he had a fine taste in painting,...
Էջ 16 - Thetis' son he bends his care, And plunge the Greeks in all the woes of war. Then bids an empty phantom rise to sight, And thus commands the vision of the night : • . directs Fly hence, delusive dream, and, light as air, To Agamemnon's royal tent repair ; Bid him in arms draw forth th' embattled train, March all his legions to the dusty plain.

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