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intelligence which will not allow them to starve when but a poor fence prevents them from enjoying good feed.

The Devons, as a race, are active and hardy, and will thrive on coarse and scanty feed, but like all others will do much better on fine and plenty. They are peaceable in disposition, and are easily kept within bound. They are good in the yoke, at the pail, and, like the lIerefords, first rate for the butcher.” They recommend that increased attention be paid to these breeds suited to our soil and climate.

For best thorough bred Durham short horn bull, two years old or over, to Obediah Whittier of North Vienna.

Second best, to William Houghton of Anson.
For best bull calf, to William Houghton of Anson.
Second best, to Warren Percival of Vassalborough.
For best Durham cow, to Charles Hunnewell of South Windham.
Second best, to William Houghton of Anson.
Third best, to Warren Percival of Vassalborough.
For best yearling, to Warren Percival of Vassalborough.

For best full blood Ayrshire bull, two years old and over, to 0. W. Straw of Orrington.

Second best, to S. L. Goodale of Saco.

For best full blood Ayrshire cow, three years old or more, to S. L. Goodale of Saco.

Second best, to 0. W. Straw of Orrington.

For best full blood Jersey bull, two years old and over, to W. S. Grant of Farmingdale.

Second best, to George W. Hammond of Westbrook.
For best one year old Jersey bull, to 0. W. Straw of Orrington.
Second best, to E. & P. H. Holmes of Winthrop.
For best Jersey bull calf, to Samuel Guild of Augusta.

For best full blood Jersey cow, three years old and over, to George W. Hammond of Westbrook.

Second best, " Jessie,” to E. & P. H. Holmes of Winthrop.
Third best, to S. F. Dike of Bath.
Fourth best, to W. S. Grant of Farmingdale.

For best full blood Jersey heifer, two years old, to W. S. Grant of Farmingdale.

Second best, to E. & P. H. Holmes of Winthrop.

For best full blood Jersey yearling heifer, "Little Bell,” to Samuel Wood of Winthrop.

Second best, to W. S. Grant of Farmingdale.
Third best, "Minnie," to E. & P. H. Holmes of Winthrop.

For best full blood Jersey heifer calf, to W. S. Grant of Farmingdale.

Second best, to E. & P. H. Holmes of Winthrop.

The committee remark:-. These classes of cattle are of recent introduction into the State. They are looked upon with favor by a few, who more trustful and enterprising than many, have taken the pains and incurred the expense of giving them a trial, with a view of obtaining for themselves directly, and for the State indirectly, the particular benefits and advantages which each class naturally afford.

It is proper here to speak in high commendation of the liberal, and we think, very wise and judicious policy of the managers of the State Society, in making their schedule of premiums open to all the different breeds and races of farm stock, and inviting competition in them all.

This course is virtually saying to the farmers of Maine, we wish to make no invidious distinctions in your varied pursuits.

Be persuaded in your own mind which class of cattle or stock will best meet your wants, and strive for preeminent excellence therein, and to stimulate and encourage your labors we appropriate a share of the Society's means to be awarded to you as testimonials of your skill and faithful industry in your special department. This liberal policy has had a wonderful effect in bringing out to our shows, for the last two years, a greater variety of excellent stock than is usually met with in exhibitions of the kind. In looking over the returns of the several State exhibitions, we find but very few of them where all the breeds and races of cattle are represented.

The Ayrshires are a breed of comparatively recent origin, brought about by the labors of breeders in the county of Ayr in Scotland. Their speciality is for dairy purposes, and they have become somewhat celebrated for their property or characteristic of giving a large flow of milk; at the same time are claimed for them beautiful symmetry of form, hardiness of constitution, and good feeding capacity. That the breeders of Scotland have obtained in combination these

properties in a remarkable degree cannot be denied. Whether the breeders of New England who have obtained this breed, will keep up these characteristics, or whether our peculiarities of climate will be favorable for them, remains to be shown as the results of further careful trial.

There were but few specimens of the pure breed presented, but those were very good, especially the cows of S. L. Goodale and 0. W. Straw.

The next class of cattle which came under our review was the Jerseys. This is beyond question a race, rather than a breed, possessing very peculiar and well defined characteristics.

The Jerseys have been imported, from an island of the same name in the British Channel, near the coast of France. They were introduced over thirty years ago, from the Channel islands, viz: Alderney, Guernsey and Jersey.

Their speciality is the property of giving a fair quantity of exceedingly rich milk. This renders them valuable in the butter dairies, and for this purpose, notwithstanding the profusion of sneers and taunts which are thrown upon them to an unlimited amount, they are highly prized by those whose wants require rich stores of

For this purpose your committee have no doubt they are very superior. They are, therefore, as a dairy breed, worthy of attention.

There were many very fine specimens of the Jerseys presented for the premiums and also for exbibition only. Some of them, however, gave evidence of the severity of the drouth in the early fall.

On farms where the making of butter is an object of pursuit and profit, your committee have no doubt, that, an infusion of Jersey blood will be likely to secure richness of milk, and high-flavored, delicious butter.

Your committee have seen with regret, and long heard the lamentations of lovers of good butter, that, just in proportion as the native cow has been improved by the infusion of Durham blood, the butter has depreciated in quality, for the last twenty years; and they feel that they can congratulate your Society and the farmers of the State, that, in the Jersey race, you have the means, not only of bringing the butter back to its original goodness, but to a far superior excellence.

cream.

oxen.

Objection has been made that they do not make much beef. Their feeding properties are charged against them, as a fault in so small an animal. Their fattening properties, when not giving milk, we believe, have been admitted ; and a Jersey cow, who gives milk that makes 3,000 pounds of butter, when in old age is killed, what matter is it whether she weighs 600 or 900 pounds ?

A majority of farmers who have but little heavy ox work to do, may find them profitable as working oxen, as they are hardy, intelligent and active; and, in the opinion of your committee, will do more common farm work than the slow-moulded, lymphatic, big

And those farmers who raise great steers to look at and brag over, and who keep another yoke of oxen to do the work, may find the Jersey ox very useful for that purpose."

WORKING OXEN. For best ten yokes of oxen from any one county, to Somerset.

Second best, to Kennebec.
For best five yokes from any one town, to town of Sidney.
Second best, to town of Manchester.

For best single yoke of oxen, (size symmetry and discipline considered,) to A. H. Woodman of Poland, for grade Devons-girth, seven feet five inches-four years old.

Second best, to George Ladd of Starks-grade Durham.

Third best, to Daniel Craig of Readfield-grade Durham, four years old, seven feet two inches.

For best yoke three years old steers, to Hezekiah Cross of Vassalborough-grade Durham, seven feet two inches.

Second best, to W. A. P. Dillingham of Sidney-grade Durham, six feet ten inches.

For best yoke two years old steers, to G. A. Hilton of Starksgrade Durham, six feet six inches.

Second best, to Samuel Warren of Scarborough-grade Durham, six feet five inches.

For best milch cow of any breed, to E. M. Sawtelle of Sidney.
Second best, to — Rollins of Belgrade.
Third best, to H. Norcross of Augusta.

FARM STOCK. For best farm stock from any one farm, to Isaiah Wentworth of Poland.

Second best, to John Kezar & Son of Winthrop.

SHEEP. For best flock of any breed, not less than fifty from any one farm, to Joseph M. Smith of Anson.

Second best, to Edgar Hilton of Anson.
Third best, to Wm. S. Grant of Farmingdale.

For best flock of lambs of any breed, not less than fifteen in number from any one farm, to Obediah Whittier of North Vienna.

Second best, to S. W. Smith of Anson.

For best Spanish Merino buck, one or more years old, to Benj. F. Hilton of Starks.

Second best, to S. W. Smith of Anson.

For best Silesian Merino buck, one or more years old, to S. W. Smith of Anson.

For best French Merino buck, one or more years old, to S. W. Smith of Anson.

For best French Merino ewe, one or more years old, to Joseph M. Smith of Anson.

Second best, to S. W. Smith of Anson.

For best Leicester buck, one year old or more, to Warren Percival of Vassalborough.

For best South Down buck, one year old or more, to Wm. S. Grant of Farmingdale.

For best South Down ewe, one year old or more, to Wm. S. Grant of Farmingdale.

For best Cotswold buck, to Isaac Gage of Augusta.
For best Cotswold ewe, to Wm. S. Grant of Farmingdale.
For best Cheviot buck, to E. N. Sawtelle of Sidney.

SWINE. For best boar, over two years old, to W. Hamlin of Sidney.

For best sow, to L. G. Hurlburt of West Gardiner.

For best boar, under two years, to Samuel Jackson of East Winthrop, for Chester breed.

Second best, to W. A. P. Dillingham of Sidney.
POULTRY. For best flock of hens exhibited, to William Miller.
For best flock of turkeys, to Samuel Guild.
Second best, to John O'Donnell.
For best flock of geese, to Elisha Barrows.
For best flock of ducks, to George W. Haley.
Second best, to John Ham.

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