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plows do not break nor crumble the soil much, and may hence be best adapted to light soils, rather than stiff clays.

J. W, Hanson, Portland-No. 25, 35, 4 and 9. These plows, in common with nearly all the others, are of good material and well made. No. 4 cut a slice in sod ground, when quite dry, 94 inches deep and 19 inches wide-after the sod was softened by rain, the slice was 9 inches by 20. The sod was not always handsomely laid; the mold-board is too concave, and the plow is quite hard to hold, and apparently hard to draw. No. 3} cuts a slice 9f by 20 inches. The earth is more pulverized than by most of the others.

JUSTIN S. DOE, Boston-Union Plow. This plow shows great ingenuity in construction, being intended for both hill-side and level land. It carries two mold-boards, which come alternately into use, as the implement passes and repasses. The point and forward part are reversed as in the common side-hill plow, and by a quick movement of a single second or two, one moldboard is thrown up out of the way, and replaced by the other. This change enables the plow to do better work than could be accomplished by the same mold-board for both sides, and it performed far better than any other side-hill plow on the ground, doing very fair work on level sod, cutting a slice about 6} by 13 inches, and laying it over well and quite flat. On a side-hill of moderate slope, it cut 78 inches deep and 14 inches wide, doing good work. Its arrangement admits of the application of stubble furrow-boards to the same beam and skeleton, as used for sod-boards; also, by the removal of one bolt, and the left hand furrow-board, a subsoil furrow-board can be applied in its place, which makes it a tolerably good subsoil plow. It leaves no centre or dead furrow. It holds very easily. The only objection to this plow is its complexity, and consequent cost-cost of original purchase, and greater cost to keep all parts in repair. Price, including all extras, $22.50.

KENDALL & WHITNEY, Portland-Lion Plow, Nos. 60, 61 and 10. These plows were distinguished for their rather convex moldboards. They did not bury the grass perfectly at the corner of the sod—otherwise they performed fair work. No. 61 cut a furrow

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THE HOLBROOK UNIVERSAL PLOW, With its several Mold Boards adapted to its various sizes and styles of plowing.

slice 8 inches deep and 161 inches wide. The handles were unusually short and upright; if longer and more nearly horizontal, the plow would hold somewhat more easily. No. 10 cut a slice 9 inches by 18, and did good work, but was rather hard to hold.

J. MEANS & Son, Augusta, Nos. 2} and 3-I. VAN KURAN & Co., makers, Boston.

Rather convex mold-boards, with scour equally. No. 23 differs only from No. 3 in having a wooden beam instead of one of iron. The iron beam is too short, preventing the steady motion of the plow, and tending to throw it by an irregular motion on the point. The wing forming the rear end of the mold-board spreads too wide, pressing against the sod unnecessarily, and hence, by throwing the plow to the left, rendering it hard to hold. With these exceptions, it appears to be a very good plow, and did good work—the form of the mold-board, aside from the spreading wing, being excellent.

HOLBROOK's Universal Plow.

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Framework of the Universal Plow, with mold-board detached.

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Universal Plow, with interval mold-board for plowing flat furrows in smooth grass lands.

This is furnished with a number of different mold-boards, for different purposes. It was tried only on greensward. It had a concave mold-board, like that of Prouty & Mears', turned the sod handsomely, pulverized the earth, covered the grass well, and laid the furrows flat, but was rather hard to hold, from the side pressure of the mold-board against the turning sod. It was afterwards fitted with a small second mold-board in front, constituting it a Double Michigan or sod and subsoil plow, and did excellent work. As a single sod plow, it cuts a slice 7 inches by 14, and 71 by 15; as a Double Michigan, it cut a foot wide, and ten inches deep, measuring from the surface of the unplowed sod to the bottom of the furrow.

The price, with the necessary parts to make it a Double Michigan, is $18.50; besides for this purpose, the cost of a common sward mold-board is $3.50—stubble mold-board or for “upland sod,” $3 -extra cutter, $1.50—the whole $26.50.

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Holbrook's Universal Plow as a "Michigan" or sod and subsoil plow.

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