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View of the movement of two furrow slices as turned by the “Michigan” or sod and

subsoil plow.

KENDALL & WHITNEY's No. 3, Side-hill, and NOURSE, Mason & Co.'s Side-hill, No. 83, resembled each other in general construction, and being tried on slightly sloping sod, did

poor work.

Isaiah Fry, North Berwick, No. 4. This, the Foxcroft plows, and those of J. W. Hanson, were quite similar in general appearance and form. It cut a slice 7} by 15 inches, and did good work—appeared to be well made.

L. Watman, Winthrop, Nos. 21 and 22. The mold-board is medium, neither convex nor concave, the plows are easy to hold, and did fair work; but the cutting being perpendicular, the grass was not perfectly covered. The point is somewhat faulty—in other respects the plows are very like those of T. Varney & Son, described below.

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It lacked a wheel under the beam, which would be essential in irregular, adhesive, clayey soil. It was tried in a light soil and performed well, running easily for its depth, cutting down to a depth of 16 inches from the top of the unplowed sod.

J. B. WIGGIN, Portsmouth, N. H., Clipper," Nos. 7 and 9. The former cut a furrow slice 8 by 16 inches, doing good work and laying the furrow flat and neatly. It is full under the beam, raising at once the left side of the sod, and turning it over without rising high on the mold-board, and consequently rendering the plow quite easy to hold. The form of the mold-board is rather convex than otherwise. The beam and handles are rather too short. The plow is strong and well made. Number 9 was the largest plow in the field, as will be perceived by examining the table of dimensions, appended to these descriptions. It required three yokes of oxen to move it freely, and cut a sod 104 inches deep and 21 wide. The mold-board appeared to be rather too short for its breadth, or to form not a sufficiently acute angle to run easily, and the handles were rather short. It was quite easy to hold for its great size, and is a good plow. Clipper No. 4, was not tried.

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This plow has many excellent qualities, but the mold-board is rather too concave, and pressing hard against the sod in inverting it, is hard to hold. The plow cuts under the edge of the sod, so as to leave the cut edge of the unplowed land inclining or leaning toward the furrow at an angle of about 15 degress from the perpendicular. Consequently when this sod is next turned over, it wedges down closely against the previous sod, lies flat and the line of grass is completely covered. The slice cut by this plow was 8 by 16 inches.

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KENDALL & WHITNEY's Double Michigan, No. 85.

This appeared to be a good implement of this construction-it cut with four horses

9; inches deep and 13 widethe depth of the heaped or made soil was about 16 inches. The perfect manner in which the sod was turned deeply under and covered with a bed of mellow soil from below, was much admired by those among the spectators who were not familiar with the Michigan plow.

T. VARNEY & Son, Windham, Nos. 5 and 6. These two plows were precisely similar, except in size—the smaller cut a furrow slice 8 by 16 inches, and the larger 8} by 17 inches. The god was laid flat, and the work well done. The moldboard is rather simple in form, neither convex nor concave.

The plows are stout and well made; they are easy to hold and appear to be very good implements, but do not sufficiently pulverize the sod nor cover the line of

grass.

GRUBBER.

Besides the plows presented, there was upon the ground a "Scotch Grubber,made to order for John F. Anderson, Esq., of South Windham, by Messrs. Cuming & Rose, of Portland. Mr. Rose, it is understood, served an apprenticeship to implement making in Scotland, and is evidently well versed in the construction of such an instrument. It was not understood to be entered in competition for the premium offered for an “implement for deep and thorough pulverization of the soil, that shall successfully compete with the plow,” inasmuch as it was not intended to supersede the plow, but rather as an assistant to it in deep and thorough pulverization of the soil. To those not familiar with the grubber, it may be described as somewhat similar in construction and principle to the cultivators in ordinary use, except that it is wholly of iron, and is supported on three wheels, so arranged with leverage as to allow working its long coulter-like tines or teeth to any depth up to sixteen inches. Its length through the centre was five feet. Width inside the hind wheels four feet. The tines arranged so as to cut (from centre of one to another) eight inches apart. The diameter of the forward

wheel nine inches, and of the two binder wheels eighteen inches each. Cost, $35.

The committee very much regret that they had no land at command in proper condition to test its qualities fully, as they have little doubt it would have shown itself a most valuable implement. Mr. Anderson is understood to have used it upon bis farm with marked success, and it is known to have been long and highly esteemed in England and Scotland as an economical and efficient aid in deep, clean and thorough cultivation, and it is hoped that it may attract, among our farmers, the attention which its merits deserve.

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102 «

No. 3,

139 15

.

ab. cb. cd., ef. gh. ei. Hight. Weight. Price. Foxcroft, No. 4,

423,214 18 125 124 264 143 lbs. $12 00 No. 35, 41 21 17 12 114 24

114 "

11 00 J. W. Hanson, No. 25,

38 20 16 10 10 22 14
401 21 184 12 114 25 14 112 «

11 00
No. 4,
43 23 19 12 12 26 15

12 00 No.9, 48 24 21 13 13 33

160 *

14 00 J. S. Doe's Union,

45 22 18 12 11 27 16

195 " max. 20 00 Lion, No. 60,

42 24 171 11 11.30

145 130

13 50 61, 43 25 18 11 11. 30

145 135 «

13 00 10. 48 27 20 14 14 38 16

180 oC

15 00 Kendall & Whitney, No. 3, sidebill,

36 22 17. 114 11 27 16 134 « J. Means & Son, No. 21,

43 26 18 11 11 30 16

122 «

14 50 No. 3, 43 26 20 11 11 30 163 142

15 00 Holbrook's Universal, (for sod,) 46 25 194 12 11. 29 17 124 " 154 max. J. B. Wiggin, Clipper, No.7, 40 20 18 12 12 32 154 152

13 00 No. 9, 49 30 24 14 14 42 195 200 «

15 00 No. 4, 36 22 16 10 10 31 14

108 “

10 00 Isaiah Fry, No. 4, 43 22 19 12 12 27 15

12 00 L. Whitman, No. 21, 36 22 17 10 10 26 14

10 50 No. 22, 45 25 18 11.110 31 16

138 (6

11 00 Prouty & Mears, No. 155, 42 26 18 117 11 31 16

14 00 Nourse, Mason & Co., side-bill, Eagle, No. 83,

41 32 18 114 91 27

155 133 “

13 50 Michigan, (Kendall & Whitney,) No. 85, 38 25 19 9 10 27 17

13 00 Small mold-board,

64 6811 T. Varney & Son, No. 5, 43 22 17 118 11 28 133 134 "

11 50 44 234 19 12 12 26 15

1466

12 50 Nourse, Mason & Co., subsoil, cuts 6d wide,

163

14 00

131 « 107 «

119 «

161 «

25

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No. 6,

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