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Gorham, to whom we award the second premium; and Ithiel Blake of Gorham, to whom we award the third premium.

We recommend the publication, as a part of this report, of the statements, and the account current with the several crops, of the successful competitors, and also those of Leonard Shaw of Standish; all of these documents being worthy a careful examination by the farmers. It will be perceived that the value placed upon the corn fodder, and upon the manure left in the soil for future crops is estimated very differently; the latter varying from twenty-five to eightytwo per cent of the value at first applied. We do not presume to decide who is nearest right, but call attention to the differences of opinion, hoping that farmers may be induced to make some carefully conducted experiments tending to settle these uncertain points.

Amos Boulter's Statement. My crop consisted of 444 bushels of 56 pounds to the bushel, and was grown upon one half of an acre, being at the rate of 89} bushels to the acre. The soil on which it was grown, was interval or sandy loam, free from stones and clay, of light color and very fine. The subsoil is also sandy,—the distance to subsoil is about one foot,planted last year to corn; broke up the year previous. I put on the land last year about two cords of manure in the hill.

The present year I have spread upon the ground two cords of manure and plowed it in, after which I applied two cords in the hill. Corn planted on the 21st of May; distance between rows, four feet, and between hills three feet; used about four quarts of seed, which was used without any previous preparation. The corn was cut up and shocked September 15th, and harvested October 15th. DR. Crop of Indian Corn.

CR. Plowing 14 days,

$1 16 448 bushels at $1.16 per bushel, $51 91 2 cords barnyard manure,

5 00 2 tons fodder, 2 cords other old manure,

5 00 Manure left in soil for future Carting and applying same,

2 00
crops-estimated,

2 50 Harrowing, Furrowing and planting,

1 00 Cultivating twice, Hoeing twice, three days,

3 00 Cutting stalks, harvesting, housing and stacking,

3 00 Husking, 4 quarts of seed, Manure left in soil from former orop,

$58 41 Interest on land, 1 50 Deduct cost,

27 24 Total, $27 24 Profit,

$31 17

4 00

75

50

4 00

13

.

Colman Harding's Statement. My crop, consisting of 634 bushels of 60 pounds to the bushel, was grown on 129 rods of land, being at the rate of 79 3-43 bushels to the acre. The soil on which it grew, was high land, loamy, dry, dark soil, fine and easily worked; ledge at a short distance from surface; land broken up in 1858, and lightly manured and planted with corn-crop light. Last spring, spread a light dressing of new barnyard manure and plowed it in-well harrowed. Planted about 2} by 3 feet apart. Planted about 20th of May with eight-rowed corn, without soaking and used no top dressing. Hoed once. Harvested about 10th October. DR. Crop of Corn.

CR. Plowing once-day, $2 25 63| bushels, at $1.10,

$70 13 3} cords barnyard manure, 10 50 2 tons fodder,

10 00 3 cords other manure,

14 00 Manure left in soil for future crops, Carting and applying same,

estimated at

20 00 Harrowing, Furrowing and planting, 3 50

100 13 Cultivating,

Deduct cost,

54 75 Hoeing once-2 days,

3 00 Cutting and harvesting, 1 50 Profit,

$45 38 Husking, threshing and cleaning, 5 00 Raised on same land 6 quarts seed, 60 2 cartloads of pumpkins,

10 00 Manure left in soil from former crop, 5 00 500 pounds of squash,

5 00 Interest on land, 2 40 bushels of beans,

1 50 $54 75

$16 50 Making the profit on the 129 rods, of produce, $61.88.

6 00

50

50

among

the corn.

Ithiel Blake's Statement. My crop, consisting of 63 bushels of sound corn of 56 pounds to the bushel, was grow on 139 square rods, being at the rate of 721 bushels to the acre. The soil upon which it grew was dark clayey loam, free from stone--about twelve inches deep to the subsoilwhich is clay of a light color, dry and hard. The soil is fine and mellow. Land broken up in May, 1858, and a crop of about one hundred and seventy-five bushels of potatoes raised from it, without any manure or dressing, excepting about three bushels plaster applied in the hill. About the first of last May I hauled on about four cords of stable manure, spread it on, and plowed about eleven inches deep. Planted corn (common eight to twelve rowed variety) putting about one cord of old stable manure, finely rotted, in the hill. I also put 100 pounds of superphosphate of lime in the hills, mixing it well with the manure, and covering it with earth about one inch before dropping the seed. The bills were about even with the surface of the ground when planted—used about four quarts of seed, four kernels in a hill, without any previous preparation ; hoed twice without any hilling up. Cut stalks Sept. 10. Harvested corn about Oct. 10.

DR.
Crop of Corn.

CR. Plowing 1 day, $2 00 63 bushels at $1,

$63 00 5 cords barnyard manure, at $4, 20 00 2 bushels at 50c.,

1 25 100 lbs. superphosphate of lime, 3 12 Fodder,

16 00 Carting and applying same,

3 00 Manure left in soil for future crops, Harrowing, 1 00 estimated,

15 00 Planting,

2 00 Cultivating twice, 75

95 25 Hoeing twice, 2 00 Deduct cost,

39 24 Cutting stalks, and harvesting, 1 50 Housing, stacking, and husking, 1 75 4 quarts seed,

12 Manure left in soil from former crop, Interest on land,

2 00

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Leonard Shaw's Statement. My crop of corn, consisting of 374 bushels of 60 pounds to the bushel, was grown on one half of an acre, being at the rate of 75 bushels to the acre. The soil on which it grew, was a moist gravelly loam, considerably stony, of a redish color, fine and mellow, plowed to about nine inches deep. The subsoil is rather a coarse gravel and from fifteen to eighteen inches from the surface.

Two-thirds of the land was broken up in the fall of 1857,planted to potatoes without manure in 1858; the other third was broken up in the fall of 1858.

In May last I put on three cords of green barnyard manure and plowed it in; furrowed the rows three and one half feet apart, putting the hills the same distance. I put 1} cords of compost manure in the hills-composted of muck and old yard manure; also, one bushel of plaster and the same amount of ashes put in the hills at the time of planting. Planted the 16th of May with a kind of corn that has been usually planted on this farm for fifty years; has no particular name; the ears are from eight to sixteen rows each. The seed had not been soaked. I cut the top stalks about the middle of September. Hauled in the corn and husked it the first of October. DR. Crop of Corn.

CR. Plowing once-2 days, $2 0037} bushels at $1.15,

$43 12 3 cords barnyard manure,

900 2 bushels unsound, 18 cords other manure,

3 00 Fodder, Carting and applying the same,

2 00 Manuró left in soil for fåture crop, Harrowing,

estimated at

500 Furrowing and planting, Cultivating twice,

61 12 Hoeing twice-2 days,

2 00
Deduct cost,

26 17 Dressing and applying the same;

plaster and ashes, Cutting and harvesting,

1 50 Husking,

3 00 4 quarts of seed, Interest on land,

1 00

1 00 2 00

50 75 75

50

17

Total,

$26 17

Profit,

$24 95

Winter Wheat. One entry only was made for the premiums on winter wheat. This was by Hubbard Wilson of Gorham, who has given evidence of having grown a very good crop, and his statements below tells how it was done. He had, however, forgotten to make oath to his statements. We cannot, therefore, award a premium, but recommend a gratuity.

Mr. Wilson's estimate of the value of manure left in the soil for future crops is rather large; more than one hundred per cent. of the value first applied. The sample exhibited was excellent-clean, full and white.

We are glad to see this evidence that winter wheat can be grown in our county, and hope other farmers will be encouraged by Mr. W.'s success to give it a trial.

Hubbard Wilson's Statement. My crop of wheat, consisting of 24 bushels, of 64 pounds to the bushel, was grown upon one acre and 20 rods, being at the rate of 211 bushels to the acre. The soil upon which it grew was clay loam, upon a slight ridge falling to the south. The soil previous to plowing was green sward-cutting one ton of hay to the acre. Used about 2} cords of manure-spread previous to sowing. Six bushels unleached asbes and four bushels plaster were sown first of May. Sowed 14 bushels of white wheat soaked in strong brine, and mixed with six quarts lime, September 15, 1858. DR. Crop of Winter Wheat.

CR. Plowing 1 day, team and hands, $4 00 24 bushels at $2.00,

$48 00 21 cords barn manure,

12 50 Tons straw, 1ő bushels ashes and plaster, 2 00 Manure left in soil for future crops, Carting and applying same, 2 00 estimated,

15 33 Harrowing and rolling, Harvesting, 3 00

$66 33 Threshing and cleaning,

Deduct cost,

35 50 14 busbels seed,

2 50 Interest of land,

3 00

2 50

4 00

3 00

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Summer Wheat. We award the Society's first premium on summer wheat, to William Marean of Standish, he being the only applicant. Mr. Marean's statements, herewith submitted, are good; but the farmers of the county would have been pleased to know the date of sowing, as it is very evident that neither midge or rust injured the crop essentially, and is said that both may be avoided by sowing at the right time; query, when is that time?

The berry of the sample exhibited was good; but it was considerably mixed with oats and barley.

William Marean's Statement. My crop of wheat, consisting of 224 bushels, was grown on one acre. The soil on which it grew, was dry, yellowish loam, about a foot deep to the subsoil, which is dry, yellow and hard; soil, mellow and stony. It was broken up in 1858, after about ten cartloads of old manure had been spread on and harrowed in, planted to corn; had a good crop. Last spring it was spread with ten loads of old barnyard manure, plowed and harrowed. Sowed common summer wheat-used dry seed. Crop harvested about August 15th, and threshed about one month later. DR. Crop of Wheat.

CR. Plowing once, f day, $2 00 224 bushels, at $2.00,

$44 50 24 cords barn yard manure,

10 00 23 tons straw, Carting and applying same,

1 50 Manure left in the soil for future Harrowing,

1 50
crops, estimated at

8 00 Sowing, Harvesting and housing, 1 00

$65 00 Threshing and cleaning,

4 00 Deduct cost, 1 bushel of seed, Manure left in soil from former crop, 4 00 Interest on land,

2 00

12 50

.

25

28 25

2 00

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Barley. Two lots of barley were exhibited; one by Charles Thompson of Standish, the other by Ebenezer Hawkes of Windham. The berry of the former-six rowed variety-was good; the latter -two rowed variety-was very good.

Mr. Thompson's statements, as appears below, are explicit, and we award to bim the first premium.

Mr. Hawkes has failed to give us the cost of his crop, and we cannot, therefore, well judge of the profit of his experiment, but recommend a gratuity.

Charles Thompson's Statement. My crop of barley, consisting of 34 bushels of 45 pounds to the bushel, was grown on 97 square rods, being at the rate of 564 bushels to the acre. The soil upon which it grew was a dark mellow loam, about ten inches deep over the subsoil and not very_stonymany of the stones having been removed from the soil. The subsoil is yellow, fine and generally dry.

The land was broken up in the fall of 1856, planted with corn and potatoes in 1857, and in 1858 with a crop of corn. About two

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