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land. But not having a sample of his crop to decide as to its quality, we are unable to give it the station to which it may be justly entitled.

Washington Colcord of Porter raised 501 bushels on three acres, which he described as red bearded wheat. The specimen exhibited was fine and clean. But the quantity raised per acre was not sufficient to compete with the larger quantity raised on a less amount of land.

Joseph Stevens of Fryeburg raised 16 bushels of spring rye, from one bushel of seed, on 1 acre and 8 rods of land, being at the rate of 153 bushels per acre. The soil was light and sandy, and the year previous corn was raised by manuring in the hill. Thirty bushels of ashes were spread on after sowing. He is the only applicant, and we consider that he has done enough to entitle him to the first premium.

Frederic N. Frye of Fryeburg, is the sole claimant for bounty for the greatest crop of oats. He is entitled to the first premium by raising 85 bushels on 14 acres of land, being at the rate of 68 bushels per acre. The oats succeeded a crop of corn.

We award Mark F. Witham the first premium for seed wheatbeing of the crop on which a premium is awarded.

To Samuel Stickney of Brownfield, we recommend a gratuity equal to the second premium on seed wheat, for his energy in continuing to raise a good specimen of winter wheat. We consider it important that the raising of winter wheat in the district should not be wholly given up.

The applicants for premium for the best crop of corn, with statements properly made and attested, are as follows:

J. W. Colby of Denmark, 81 bushels on one acre of land.

Reuben Kimball of Hiram, 88 bushels on one acre and 53 rods, being at the rate of 66 bushels per acre.

James Walker of Fryeburg, 62 bushels on one acre of land.

Statement of Benjamin F. Whitcomb. My crop, consisting of 29 bushels of wheat, was grown on one acre of land. The soil on which it grew was deep upland. Was dressed on the sward the year before, with 22 loads of winter manure, and turned under to the depth of eight inches ; harrowed down well, furrowed out, and 12 loads of dressing put in the hill.

Plowed again the present spring, and seeded with one and one-half bushels bald wheat. The weevil worked bad. I should probably have got 40 bushels if the weevil had not got into it.

Statement of Mark F. Witham. My crop, consisting of 24 bushels of wheat, was grown on one acre of land. The soil upon which it grew was planted to corn last year, with 16 cartloads of manure; plowed this spring ; sowed the 10th of May, 1} bushels seed; harvested about the 20th of August.

The field is a hard, stony soil, plowed eight inches deep. The cost of growing the same and its value are as follows: Dr. Crop of Wheat.

CR. Plowing, $300 241 bushels at $2,

$49 50 Harvesting, 2 00 Fodder,

6 00 Thresbing,

6 00 Manure left in soil for future crop, 1} bushels seed, 3 00 estimated,

2 00 Manure left from former crop,

5 00 Interest on land, 1 50

51 50 Deduct cost,

20 50

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Statement of James Walker. My crop, consisting of 20 bushels of 58 pounds to the bushel, was grown on one acre.

The soil on which it was grown was rocky loam, of a dark color, rather fine. Depth of soil, two feet, resting on a hard, gravelly subsoil. No manure was applied to the land the present season, for the benefit of this crop. The variety sowed is called the Scotch Fyfe wheat. The cost of growing the same and its value are as follows: Dr. Crop of Wheat.

CR. Plowing 2 days at ,75, . $1 50 20 bushels at $2,

$40 00 Harrowing,

1 ton straw,

3 00 Sowing, Harvesting, 2 00

43 00 Threshing,

2 00
Deduct cost,

725 I bushel seed,

2 00

50
25

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on one acre.

Statement of James Walker. My crop consisting of 231 bushels of spring wheat, was raised

The soil upon which it grew was a chocolate colored, stony loam, fine, resting on a hard, gravelly subsoil, about 2} feet from the surface. Said land was in corn, the previous year, it having been manured for that crop by 8 cords of barnyard manure to the acre. No manure was applied to the wheat crop this year. Plowed once, third day of May, 1859. Sowed May 7th, five pecks to the acre, of the Scotch Fyfe variety, washed in brine and dried with ashes before sowing. Harvested the 18th of August. The cost of growing the same and its value are as follows:

Dr.

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Crop of Wheat. Plowing two days,

$1 50 233 bushels at $1.75, Cultivating one day,

1 00 14 tons straw at $1, Harvesting,

1 50 Housing,

50 Thresbing,

3 00 if bushels of seed,

2 00 Manure left in soil from former crop, 4 00 Interest on land,

1 20 Deduct cost, $14 70 Profit,

47 12 14 70

$32 42

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Statement of Washington Colcord. My crop consisting of 501 bushels, was grown on three acres, being at the rate of 17 bushels to the acre. The soil upon which it grew was a gravelly loam, stony and of a yellow color, rather coarse, and about one foot deep. Was broken up the last days of May, 1858,-put on about 6 cords of green manure, and planted to corn, and raised about 150 bushels. Prior to 1858, for eight years it had been in grass, averaging for the last two or three years, about } a ton per acre. No manure was put on in 1859. Sown May 6th, The seed was red bearded wheat, one bushel to the acre, sown dry. Harvested about August 12th. It was cut with a cradle.

Statement of Joseph Stephens. My crop, consisting of 16 bushels of rye, was grown on one acre and eight rods of land, being at the rate of 157 bushels to the acre. The soil upon which it grew was a light sand. It was planted to corn, last year, which was manured in the hill, and no other manure applied. The rye was sown about the first of May, and after it was up thirty bushels of ashes were sown on the piece. The soil is about ten inches deep. I harvested it in August. The cost of seed, (one bushel,) sowing and harvesting, is $1.50. The worth of the rye at my house is one dollar per

bushel.

CR.

Statement of Frederic N. Frye. My crop, consisting of 85 bushels of oats, of 33 pounds to the bushel, was grown on 14 acres of land, being at the rate of 68 bushels to the acre. The soil upon which it grew was loamy, eight inches to subsoil, dark colored. Planted to corn the previous year. Sown the middle of May. The cost of growing the same and its value are as follows: DR.

Crop of Oats. Plowing, $3 00 85 bushels,

$42 50 4 cords madure, 4 00 Straw,

8 00 Carting and applying same,

2 00 Manure left in soil for future crop, Harrowing and sowing,

1 25
estimated,

2 00 Harvesting,

1 50 Threshing,

3 00 2 bushels seed,

1 00 Manure left in soil from former crop, 2 00

52 50 Interest on land, 2 40 Deduct cost,

20 10 $20 10 Profit,

$32 40

Statement of Joseph W. Colby. My crop consisting of 81 bushels of corn, was raised on one acre of land. The nature of the soil is light, fine and loamy, and of a yellow color, 12 inches deep. Its mechanical condition is good. The treatment of the soil and crops is given in the annexed account. The manure was spread upon the furrow. It was planted with a hoe, on the 15th of May. The seed was 8 rowed; used 16 quarts, The cost of growing the same and its value are as follows: Dr. Crop of Corn.

Co. Plowing 4 days, at 1.25, $5 00 81 bushels, at $1,

$81 00 7 cords barnyard manure,

2} tons fodder,

17 50 Applying same,

3 00 Manure left in soil for future crop, 15 00 Harrowing,

2 00 Furrowing and planting,

2 50 Cultivating twice,

1 25 Hoeing twice, 10 days,

10 00 Cutting stalks and harvesting, 5 50 Husking, 8 days,

8 00 16 quarts seed,

113 50 Interest on land, 1 20 Deduct cost,

60 09

21 001

64

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Statement of Reuben Kimball. My crop consisting of 88 bushels of corn, was grown on one acre 53 rods, being at the rate of 66 bushels to the acre. The soil on which it grew was interval, plowed į last fall and the other half this spring. It is a sandy loam, free from stones, lying on the bank of the Saco river. The field cut about 15 cwt. of hay last year. The manure was taken from my barn cellar, eighteen loads were harrowed in, in the spring, and twelve put in the hill. It was planted the 18th and 19th of May, and cut and shocked the middle of September. The seed is the large twelve rowed variety, grown by me for several years. The cost of growing the same and its value are as follows: DR. Crop of Corn.

CR. Plowing, 6 days, $6 00 88 bushels, at $1,

$88 00 30 loads manure, 30 00 Fodder,

10 00 Harrowing,

200 Manure left in soil for future crops, Furrowing, 4 00 estimated,

10 00 Hoeing, 8 days,

8 00 Harvesting, 8 00

$108 00 Seed,

Deduct cost,

58 50

50

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Statement of James Walker. My crop, consisting of 62 bushels of corn, was grown on one acre of land. The soil upon which it grew was upland loam, quite rocky, 2} feet deep, of chocolate color, not very light, resting on a hard, gravelly subsoil. Said land was in grass the previous year. In May last I spread on 8 cords of manure from my manure cellar. On the 18th I plowed in the manure and greensward, and on the 23d planted, after harrowing. Made the rows nearly north and

south, about 3} feet apart, with hills 21 feet apart. The seed planted was the eight rowed sort, large kernels, small cob, which I call the best sort of corn for me to cultivate. The stalks above the ear are small, consequently less exhausting to the soil. Put on a gill of ashes and plaster to the hill, before the first hoeing. Hoed twice. The corn was cut down by the frost in June. Harvested September 15th. I had in addition to the good corn as above, eight bushels of ears of soft corn. The cost of growing the same and its value are as follows: Dr. Crop of Corn.

CR. Plowing, 4 days, $300 62 bushels, at $1.20,

$74 40 8 cords manure, 32 00 4 tons fodder, at $3 per ton,

12 00 Applying same,

3 75 Manure left in soil for future crop, Harrowing, 75 estimated,

16 00 Planting,

1 50 8 bushels of soft corn

will offset in Cultivating, 2 days,

1 50 terest on land. Hoeing, 4 days,

3 00 Ashes and plaster, and applying same, 4 00 Harvesting,

75 Housing,

75 Husking, 3 days, 2 25

$102 40 16 quarts seed,

Deduct cost,

53 85

.

50

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Root CROPS AND PEAS. The committee report :—Three entries on potatoes. One by Jas. Walker of Fryeburg, -it being 23 bushels on 12 square rods, equal to 320 bushels to the acre.

One by James O. Fessenden of Brownfield. Amount, 173 bushels on half acre, being at the rate of 346 bushels to the acre.

One by J. S. Walker of Fryeburg, consisting of 190 bushels, grown on 81 rods, being at the rate of 380 bushels to the acre.

To Andrew H. Evans of Fryeburg, the premium for the largest · crop of ruta bagas, on 48 rods, amounting to 65 bushels—at the rate of 520 to the acre.

Stephen P. Walker of Fryeburg, entered a crop of peas, consisting of 114 bushels grown on 68 rods, being at the rate of 26 bushels to the acre, for which we award premium.

Statement of James 0. Fessenden. My crop consisting of 173 bushels of potatoes, was grown on 80 rods of land, being at the rate of 346 bushels to the acre. The soil on which it grew was high interval, a composition of muck and sand. It was grass land, last spring.

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