Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1881, by

THE AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

CONTENTS.

PAGE.

AGRICULTURAL ADVANCEMENT IN THE UNITED STATES. By Prof. C. V. Riley... 47

AGRICULTURAL SURVEYS. By Prof. E. W. Hilgard..

75

BOOKS AND PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED...

237
CHARTER, CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE ASSOCIATION.

241
CORRELATIONS OF ANIMAL FORM. By Dr. Manly Miles.

31
COUNTRY HOMES, AND WHO SHOULD HAVE THEM. By Rear-Admiral Daniel
Ammen

149

CULTURE OF WATERMELONS. By Hon. Cassius M. Clay.

125

EDITORIAL....

5

FERTILITY. By E. Lewis Sturtevant, M. D.

143

FISH CULTURE. By Seth Green

141

HOLSTEIN CATTLE. By Chas. Houghton...

165

IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION. By N. S. Bailey

121

IRRIGATION IN CALIFORNIA. By Alfred L. Kennedy, M. D.

183

Is it CHOLERA THAT KILLS OUR Hors? By Benjamin Rose.

167

JERSEY CATTLE. By Richard Goodman, Jun....

157

LAND AND AGRICULTURE IN ENGLAND. By Prof. J. P. Sheldon...

127

LETTERS

223
LIST OF MEMBERS..

248
LIST OF OFFICERS..

245
MILLS' SYSTEM OF ENSILAGE. By Francis D. Moulton...

187
ON INCREASING THE FERTILITY OF PASTURES. By J. B. Lawes, LL. D., F. R. S.
PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION..

9
PRODUCTIVE INDUSTRY THE SOURCE OF NATIONAL WEALTH. By Dr. Thos. P.
Janes ...

59

THE AYRSHIRE BREED OF CATTLE. By J. D. W. French...

153

TAE BOVINE LUNG PLAGUE. By James Law, Prof. Veterinary Science, Cornell
University, N. Y

103

THE DAIRY : ITS PROFITS AND PROSPECTS. · By Hon. X. A. Willard

55

THE FOREIGN CATTLE TRADE OF THE UNITED STAETS. By Col. Robert Beverley. 117

THE MERINO SHEEP OF THE UNITED STATES. By Albert Chapman.....

171

THE PROBLEM OF AMERICAN LAND-HOLDING. By Hon. George B. Loring..

17

THE QUALITY OF AMERICAN SEEDS. By Dr. A. R. Ledoux..

35

THE RAILROAD AND THE FARMER. By Edward Atkinson.....

194

THE RELATIONS OF FORESTRY TO AGRICULTURE. By John A. Warder, M. D.

TRICHINA SPIRALIS. By H. F. Atwood.

169

TRICHINOSIS

253

WHEAT CULTURE. By Arthur R. Jenner Fust...

177

WORK WHICH A NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION MAY Do. By Prof.

Wm. H. Brewer...

27

67

INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.

[blocks in formation]

A. R. Ledoux & Co.....
Ames Plow Company
American Agricultural Association, ....
Ashton's Factory Filled Salt...
B. K. Bliss & Sons..
Barnes' Wire Check Rower.
Bowker Fertilizer Co..
Bradley Fertilizer Co..
Burlington and Missouri River R. R. Co......
Cassius M. Clay....
Cheap Homes in Arkansas and East Missouri.
Columbia Bicycle.....
Delaware Fence and Machine Co...
Equitable Life Assurance Society.
F. W. Devoe & Co...
F. E. McAllister...
Farms and Homes in Arkansas..
George E. White....
Geo, B. Forrester.
Groht & McLaren..
H. J. Baker & Bro......
Hemingway's London Purple Co..
Henry Nungesser...
Houston & Texas Central Railway Co...
Howe Scale Co.....
Iowa Barb Wire Co...
J. E. Tygert & Co.
J. W. Fiske....
Keystone Manufacturing Co.....
Labor Bureau of the American Agricultural Association.
Lawson Valentine......
Little's Chemical Fluid, T. W. Lawford, Agent...
Mapes Formula and Peruvian Guano Co....
New York, Lake Erie and Western Railroad..
Pennsylvania Railroad Co..
Peter Henderson & Co....
Remington Agricultural Co..
The New York Plow Co.....
The Aultman & Taylor Co.
Valentine's Varnishes..
Vermont Farm Machine Co.
Wheeler & Melick...

[blocks in formation]

THE JOURNAL

OF THE

AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

The American Agricultural Association was started with the belief that a' national organization is just as necessary for agriculture as the Federal Government is for the States. The fact that agriculture is the main dependence of the country was recognized, and that great as its development has been and flourishing as its condition is, its resources must be husbanded and greater pains taken for its conservation. It was believed that new methods should be employed, new practices followed, and greater safeguards thrown around the industry. It was felt that larger crops should be grown from the same acreage in order to supply the increasing demands upon us for home and foreign consumption, and as agriculture never has received any proper thought or attention by the General Government, but, on the contrary, legislation has been frequently against the interests of the farmer, it was considered desirable to have a strong national organization of farmers for the protection of their rights and to procure needed legislation. They will not remain in a position that requires them to wait year after year, as in the pleuro-pneumonia matter, for congressional action.

Tbat there is room for such an organization admits of no question, for in England the strongest institution is the Royal Agricultural Society, sup ported by the best men in the land, and having a membership of 8,000. France also has a national agricultural society. In neither country is one needed so much as in America.

It is asked, How can the organization be of use? Organization is always beneficial. A society comprising within its membership representatives of the agricultural industry of every section of the country will constitute a power for good not equalled by any other body. No other institution can wield so large and useful an influence for individual and public good. Immigration matters may receive proper attention from it. Through a

was.

Journal and by conventions the best agricultural thought and experience will be collated and disseminated. Through exhibitions stimulus will be given to the production of the best. To do all this, time is necessary. The organization cannot be built up in a day. No really useful institution ever

As was said at the convention of 1879, the man who does most to popularize farming will have gone a long way towards solving a question that has agitated the minds of philanthropists of all ages—the lessening of human woe. Make farming as popular with the masses as it has been with the thinking men of all ages, and still is, and there will be less poverty, less crime, and less suffering..

The New York Herald said of the organization when starting :

“An effort is to be made to organize a National Agricultural Society. There is no country in the world where such an association could be so easily and cheaply managed, or do so much good.

The breadth and aim of the organization are as great as the land for which it is named. It will foster every interest of the soil in every section of the land. Protesting against discrimination adverse to the interests of agriculturists, it will seek to encourage every honest industry and to promote the best good of all. It invites not alone the tiller of the soil into its councils, but all who seek the general good are welcome. Natural results are sought to be obtained by practical means. So far as practicable it will perform the work formulated by the Royal Agricultural Society.

“1. The general dissemination of knowledge relative to the best methods of agriculture.

“2. Systematic testing of competing agricultural implements. “3. Scientific investigations into diseases of animals used on the farm. “4. The technical education of veterinary surgeons, tenants and land

owners.

“ 5. Exposure of frauds in the sale of inferior or adulterated manures, feeding stuffs and seeds.

“6. Embodiment of such information contained in agricultural publications as may be proved by practical experience to be useful.

“7. To encourage men of science in their attention to the improvement of agricultural implements, the construction of farm buildings and cottages, the application of chemistry to the general purposes of agriculture, the

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »