Page images
PDF
EPUB

CONTENTS.

229

No. IV.-APRIL.
Drawing in Schools,

225
How shall our Schools be supported,
The Nelumbium,

230
Asteroids,

233
A Gentleman,

236
The Promise, :

237
Education in Illinois,

238
Slates for Primary Schools,

239
The Beautiful and Tasteful in Education, 240
What is Poetry?

242
Certain Errors and their Remedy,
Hints from a Letter,

245
Avoirdupois Weight-A Lesson,

246
Course of Composition and Rhetoric, . 248

Resident Editor's Department.
Building School-Houses,

250

State Normal School,

251

Powers of School Districts,

252

Absence,

252

New London,

253

A Word from New London,

255

Items,

256

NO. I.-JANUARY.

Henry Barnard, his labors in Connecticut

and Rhode Island,

1

London Educational Exhibition, (continued) 81

European Ideas of American Education, 80

Model Department of the Normal School at

New Britain,

94

School-house Ornaments,

95

Basement School-rooms,

97

Dr. Barnard's Work on Éducation in Europe, 98

Teachers’ Institutes and School-money in

New Hampshire,

100

Resident Editor's Department.

Introductory,

102

Agency of the State Teachers' Association, 103

State Normal School,

103

What is doing for the Improvement of

Schools in Connecticut,

104

Vacations,

108

A Good Example,

109

Meeting of the National Association, 109

City and Town Associations,

110

Superintendent of Common Schools, 110

Personal Items,

111

Notices of Books,

111

No. II.-FEBRUARY.

Circular of State Superintendent,

113

School Laws,

117

Index to School Laws,

169

Education in New York,

179

Attendance upon School,

183

Yale College,

185

Educational movements in Norwich and

New London,

186

I can't tell a lie,—School Present,

187

Resident Editor's Department.

Union Graded Public Schools,

189

Correspondence,

191

Agency of State Teachers’ Association, 192

No. III.-MARCH.

Plans and Arrangements for District

Schools, No. II.,

193

Compendium U. S. Census,

195

Duty and Pleasure,

197

Graded Schools,

199

First Report of the Superintendent of

Common Schools of Maine,

200

Apathy in regard to Common Schools, 201

The British Navy and Connecticut Schools, 204

The Dark Side,

206

Arithmetic,

208

Asteroids,

210

Pestalozzian Principles of Instruction,

212

Public Schools of Cleveland,

217

Resident Editor's Department.

Ourselves,

219

What is doing for the Improvement of

Schools in Connecticut,-Essex-New

Haven-New London,

220

New Jersey Redeemed,

221

State Teachers' Association,

222

Agriculture in Common Schools,

222

Items,

223

Book Notices,

224

5022

363

NO. VII.--

JULY.

No. X.-OCTOBER.

Annual Report of the State Superintendent, 321

Annual Report, of State Superintendent,

A Just Memorial,

333

(finished,)

417

334

Attendance, Punctual and Regular,

432

What is Education,

A Lesson in Grammar,

337

The School-Master Boarding - round,' 433

436

Component Elements of the English Tongue,339 The Old Red School House,

Died of Economy,

340

Kind Words,

437

342

Honor

to whom honor is due,

438

Kind Words do not cost much,

" The People will not stand it,"

342 Plutarch, on Ignorant Teachers,

439

American Association,

343 Primary Schools,

439

Resident Editor's Department.

Resident Editor's Department.

Items,

443

Notices of Teachers' Meetings,

344 What is doing for Improvement of Schools

Apology,

344 in Connecticut,

444

Gradation of Schools,

345 Editorial Kindness,

446

What is doing in other States for Common State Teachers' Association.

446

Schools,

347 Teachers' Institutes,

447

Educational Journals,

348 Items for Connecticut,

447

Corrrespondence,

348

Notices of Books,

351

No. XI.-NOVEMBER.

No. VIII.-AUGUST.

Anniversary Exercises of the Normal

School,

449

Superintendent's Report, continued, 353

A few words to Teachers of our Winter

A Normal Expedition,

Schools,

454

The True Panacea,

365 Penmanship,

456

460

Teaching,

367 Experience in Manners,

Extract,

368

461

Moral Culture,

462

Spelling,

370 Easy Text Books,

463

New Educational Act,

372 Education,

373

Haste not-Rest not,

464

Blessed is he that Waiteth,

374

New Arrangement for School Desks,

465,

Classified Public Schools,

Mind your Stops,

377 Education vs. Crime,

466

Fourth of July at the Normal School, 378 Dr. Clark's Address,

467

Learn from every one,

379 The old School-master's Story,

470

Not Ashamed of Ridicule,

473

475

Resident Editor's Department.

Willie Graham,

Cause of a country's Enterprise and Pros-

477

What is doing for the Improvement of

perity,

Schools in Connecticut,

380

N. Hampshire State Teachers' Association, 381

Resident Editor's Department.

Books for a Teacher's Library,

382 To Teachers and Parents,

477

Educational Meetings,

383 Teachers' Institutes,

477

Book Notices,

383 | Education in New Hampshire,

478

Rules for Study,

479

No. IX.--SEPTEMBER.

Items,

479

Notices of Books,

479

Superintendent's Report, continued, 385

Holbrook's Common School Apparatus,

395

No. XII.- DECEMBER.

The School Laws,

396

The Teacher's Vocation,

396

How to Teach Arithmetic in the Primary

482

Learn to Labor and to Wait,

398

School,

484

The Months,

The Right Spirit,

399

Do it Yourselves, Boys,

L. L. Camp's Address before Alumni of

401

Normal School,

485

Home Preparation for School,

402

496

A Word from New Haven County,

The Microscope,

403
The Influence of Example,

498

Names of the Days of the Week,

404

502

Numerical Frame,

405

Henry Barnard, LL. D.,

Massachusetts Schools,

European Views of American Schools, and

407

of Dr. Barnard,

502

Expanding the Chest,

408

Spelling,

409

Resident Editor's Department.

School Affairs in Middlefield,

411

What is doing for the Improvement of

505

Resident Editor's Department.

Schools in Connecticut, :

Middlefield, -School-house Dedication, 507

509

A word for our Journal,

412 New Jersey,

509

American Journal and College Review, 412 Prof. William Russell,

509

Teachers' Institutes,

413 The New York Teacher,

510

State Normal School,

415 A few words to our Subscribers,

511

Book Notices,

416 Items,

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

.

.

[blocks in formation]

In compliance with the often and urgently repeated advice of his physicians that he should retire, for a season at least, from the confinement, anxieties, and wearying details of all official connection with schools, and with the intention, as soon and as far as his health will admit, of devoting himself to certain educational undertakings of a national character, Mr. Barnard resigned, at the beginning of the present month, the office of Principal of the State Normal School, and Superintendent of Common Schools in Connecticut, and John D. Philbrick, who as Associate Principal, has for the last two years discharged all the duties of the former office, has entered on the administration of our school system.

While we, the Associates of both in conducting this organ of the State Teachers' Association, extend the hand of welcome and the pledge of coöperation to his successor, and entertain the sure conviction that the good cause will go forward rapidly, and in the right direction under his leadership, we can not but express the regret which we feel in common with every good citizen, teacher, and active promoter of educational improvement, that Mr. Barnard, who has been for so many years, our guide, counselor, and friend, should retire at all, and especially with shattered health, from the field of his many labors at a time when his long deferred hopes of a better day for our common schools are beginning to be realized, and VOL. X., No. 1.

1

the seed which he scattered with a bountiful broadcast, is now springing up into an abundant harvest. But we will not forget in our hour of success, the earnest and able advocate of that cause when neglected and unpopular. We will not forget the generous and indomitable spirit which prompted him in the outset of his public life, to plead that cause, without fee or hope of reward, before a cold and unwilling audience, in the highest council of the State ; which induced him to abandon a professional career for which he had made a most costly and diligent preparation, and in which, steadily pursued, he was sure to win distinction and wealth; which has enabled him to turn a deaf ear to the voice of political ambition, and to close his heart to the seductions of popular applause, so easily gained by one possessed of his powers of oratory in the discussion of questions of temporary interest; which has led him to decline positions of the highest literary dignity in college and university,—that he might give himself up unreservedly to the improvement of common schools—the long forgotten heritage of the many. His labors were arduous enough in themselves—being none other than" to awaken a slumbering people, to encounter prejudice, apathy and sluggishness, to tempt avarice to loosen its grasp, to cheer the faint-hearted and sustain hope in the bosom of the desponding.” But even these labors were made still more arduous by the untoward hindrances needlessly thrown in his way by party spirit, and by a niggardly legislative economy, which compelled him every year, in order to keep his plans in operation and realize even a moderate degree of success, to expend his entire salary in the public service. Most heartily do we agree in the sentiment of a writer in the New York Review, on the labors of Mr. Barnard in Connecticut from 1838 to 1842—“We are glad to see such men engage in such a cause. We honor the spirit which is willing to spend and be spent in the public service, not in the enjoyment of sinecures loaded with honors and emoluments, but taking upon itself the burden, and if unsupported carrying it alone, through good report and through evil report, alike indifferent to the flattery or the censure of evil-minded men, and intent only on the accomplishment of its work of benevolence and humanity. To that spirit, is the world indebted for all of goodness or of greatness in it worth possessing. The exploits of the conqueror may fill a more ambitious page in history, the splendors of royalty may appear more brilliant and dazzling in the eyes of the multitude, and to the destroyer of thrones and kingdoms they may bow in terror of his power; but the energy and devotion of a single man, acting on the

hearts and minds of the people, is greater than they all. They may flourish for a day and the morrow will know them not, but his influence shall live, and through all the changes and vicissitudes of thrones, and kingdoms, and powers on earth, shall hold its onward, upward course of encouragement and hope in the great cause of human progress and advancement.”

The teachers of Connecticut and of the country can never forget his valuable services to them—to many of them individually--and to the measures and agencies which he has advocated, and to some extent projected for the advancement of their profession. In his first speech before the Legislature of Connecticut, in introducing the “ Act to provide for the better supervision of Common Schools,” he proclaimed the great truth “ that it is idle to expect good schools until we have good teachers.” 6 With better teachers will come better compensation and more permanent employment. But the people will be satisfied with such teachers as they have, until their attention is directed to the subject, and until we can demonstrate the necessity of employing better, and show how they can be made better by appropriate training in classes and seminaries, established for that specific purpose.” The same views were urged in every communication which he had occasion to make to the Board and the Legislature. In his remarks made in the House of Representatives, in 1839, on a Report of the Committee on Education, recommending an appropriation of $5,000 to be applied by the Board of Commissioners of Common Schools, in promoting the qualifications of teachers, he anticipates his own modes of improving their qualifications and the final triumph of his educational efforts.

“ The report of the Committee, brief as it is, embodies the substance of all I should have to say, if I should review in detail the condition of our common schools, with a view of proposing a series of measures for their improvement. The great want of these schools is that of better teachers. Good teachers will make better schools, and schools made better by the labors of good teachers, is the best argument which can be addressed to the community in favor of improved school-houses, a judicious selection of a uniform series of text-books in the schools of the same society, of vigilant and intelligent supervision, and liberal appropriations for school purposes. Give me good teachers, and in five years I will work not a change, but a revolution in the education of the children of this State. I will not only improve the results, but the machinery, the entire details of the system by which these results are produced. Every good teacher will himself become a pioneer, and a missionary in the cause of educational improvement. The necessity of giving such a teacher every facility of a well-located, well-ventilated, and well-seated school-house, of giving the teacher a timely supply of the best text-books and apparatus, and of keeping him employed through the year, and from year to year, with just such pupils and studies as he can teach to the best advantage--these things will be seen and felt by parents, and by districts. And the public, as represented in the

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »