Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

in Gascoigny, the inhabitants of which were formerly noted robbers, say they. But dexterity in robbing implies some degree of subtilty, from which the Gascoigns are so far removed, that they are awkward and heavy to a proverb. The Erse imports some degree of knavery, but in a ludicrous sense, as in English, you pretty rogue; though in general it denotes reproachful heaviness, or stupid laziness.-Spenser's Scholiast says, loord was wont, among the old Britons, to signify a lord; and therefore the Danes, that usurped their tyranny here in Britain, were called, for more dread than dignity, lurdans, i.. lord Danes, whose insolence and pride was so outrageous in this realm that if it fortuned a Briton to be going over a bridge, and saw the Dane set foot upon the same, he must return back till the Dane was clean over, else he must abide no less than present death: but being afterward expelled, the name of lurdane became so odious unto the people whom they had long oppressed, that, even at this day, they use for more re proach to call the quartan ague the fever lurdane. So far the Scholiast, but erroneously. From Spenser's own words, it signifies something of stupid dulness rather than magisterial arrogance. Macbean.] A drone.

Siker, thou's but a lazy lord,
And rekes much of thy swinke,

That with with fond terms and witless words
To bleer mine eyes do'st think.

Spenser.

To LOOSE. v. a. [leran, Saxon.] 1. To unbind; to untie any thing fastened.

The shoes of his feet I am not worthy to loose. Acts. Can'st thou lose the bands of Orion? Job. Who is worthy to loose the seals thereof?"

it.

Revelations.

This is to cut the knot when we cannot loose

[blocks in formation]

Burnet.

Daniel.

Luke.

The captive hasteneth that he may be loosed.
Isaiah.

He loosed and set at liberty four or five kings of the people of that country, that Berok kept in chains. Abbot.

5. To free from any obligation.

Art thou leased from a wife, seek not a wife. 1 Corinthians. 6. To free from any thing that shackles the mind.

Ay; there's the man, who, loos'd from lust and pelf,

Less to the prætor owes than to himself.

Dryden.

7. To free from any thing painful. Woman, thou art loosed from thy infirmity. Luke.

8. To disengage.

[blocks in formation]

Loosing thence by night, they were driven by contrary winds back into his port. Raleigh Loose. adj. [from the verb.] 1. Unbound; untied.

If he should intend his voyage towards my wife, I would turn her loose to him; and what he gets more of her than sharp words, let it lie on my head. Shakspeare. Lo! I see four men loose walking. Daniel. 2. Not fast; not fixed.

3.

Those few that clashed might rebound after the collision; or if they cohered, yet by the next conflict might be separated again, and so on in an eternal vicissitude of fast and loose, though without ever consociating into the bodies of planets. Bentley,

Not tight: as, a loose robe.
Not crowded; not close.

With extended wings a host might pass,
With horse and chariots rank'd in loose array.
Milion.

5. Wanton; not chaste.

Fair Venus seem'd unto his bed to bring
Her, whom he waking evermore did ween
To be the chastest flower that ay did spring
On earthly branch, the daughter of a king,
Now a loose leman to vile service bound.

Fairy Queen.
When loose epistles violate chaste eyes,
She half consents who silently denies. Dryden.
6. Not close; not concise: lax.

If an author be loose and diffuse in his stile, the translator needs only regard the propriety of the language. Felton.

7. Vague; indeterminate; not accurate.

It is but a loose thing to speak of possibilities, without the particular designs; so is it to speak of lawfulness, without the particular cases. Bacon.

It seems unaccountable to be so exact in the quantity of liquor where a small error was of little concern, and to be so loose in the doses of powerful medicines. Arbuthnot. 8. Not strict; not rigid.

9.

Because conscience, and the fear of swerving from that which is right, maketh them diligent observers of circumstances, the loose regard whereof is the nurse of vulgar folly. Hooker.

Unconnected; rambling.

I dare venture nothing without a strict examination; and am as much ashamed to put a loose indigested play upon the publick, as to offer brass money in a payment. Dryden.

Vario spends whole mornings in running over loose and unconnected pages, and with fresh curiosity is ever glancing over new words and ideas, and yet treasures up but little knowledge. Waits.

10. Lax of body; not costive.

What hath a great influence upon the health, is going to stool regularly: people that are very loose have seldom strong thoughts, or strong bodies. Locke:

II.

Disengaged; not enslaved. Their prevailing principle is, to sit as loose from

[blocks in formation]

That thrown again upon the coast,

Prior.

I may once more repeat my pain. 14. Remiss; not attentive. 15. To break LOOSE. To gain liberty. If to break loose from the conduct of reason, and to want that restraint of examination which keeps us from chusing the worse, be liberty, madmen and fools are only the freemen. Locke. Like two black storms on either hand, Our Spanish army and the Indians stand; This only space betwixt the clouds is clear, Where you, like day, broke loose from both apDryden. 16. To let LOOSE. To set at liberty; to set at large; to free from any restraint. And let the living bird loose into the open field.

pear.

Leviticus.

We ourselves make our fortunes good or bad; and when God lets loose a tyrant upon us, or a sickness, if we fear to die, or know not to be patient, the calamity sits heavy upon us.

Taylor.

In addition and division, either of space or duration, it is the number of its repeated additions or divisions that alone remains distinct, as will appear to any one who will let his thoughts Lease in the vast expansion of space, or divisibility

of matter.

Locke.

If improvement cannot be made a recreation, they must be let loose to the childish play they fancy; which they should be weaned from, by being made surfeit of it.

LOOSE. n. s. [from the verb.]

1. Liberty; freedom from restraint, Come, and forsake thy cloying store, And all the busy pageantry

Locke.

That wise men scorn, and fools adore:
Come, give thy soul a loose, and taste the plea-

sures of the poor.

Lucia, might my big swoln heart

Dryden.

Vent all its griefs, and give a loose to sorrow,
Marcia could answer thee in sighs. Addison.

The fiery Pegasus disdains

To mind the rider's voice, or hear the reins;
When glorious fields and opening camps he views,
He runs with an unbounded loose.

Prior.

Poets should not, under a pretence of imitating the ancients, give themselves such a loose in lyricks, as if there were no connection in the world. Felton.

2. Dismission from any restraining force. Air at large maketh no noise, except it be sharply percussed; as in the sound of a string, where air is percussed by a hard and stiff body, and with a sharp loose. Bacon.

LoosELY. adu. [from loose.]

1. Not fast; not firmly; easily to be disengaged.

I thought your love eternal: was it ty'd

Part loosely wing the region, part more wise In common, rang'd in figure, wedge their way. Milton.

He has within himself, all degrees of perfection that exist loosely and separately in all second beings. Norris.

4. Irregularly.

A bishop, living loosely, was charged that his conversation was not according to the apostles lives. Camden.

5. Negligently; carelessly.

We have not loosely through silence permitted things to pass away as in a dream. Hooker.

The chiming of some particular words in the memory, and making a noise in the head, seldom happens but when the mind is lazy, or very loosely and negligently employed.

Locke. 6. Unsolidly; meanly; without dignity. A prince should not be so loosely studied, as to remember so weak a composition.

[blocks in formation]

The stage how loosely does Astrea tread, Who fairly puts all characters to bed? Popea To LOOSEN. v. n. [from loose.] To part; to tend to separation.

When the polypus appears in the throat, extract it that way, it being more ready to loosen when pulled in that direction than by the nose. Sharp.

To Lo'OSEN. v. a [from loose.]
1. To relax any thing tied.

2. To make less coherent.

After a year's rooting, then shaking doth the tree good, by loosening of the earth.

3. To separate a compages.

[blocks in formation]

It resolves those difficulties which the rules beget; it loosens his hands, and assists his understanding. Dryden.

5. To make not costive.

Fear looseneth the belly; because the heat retiring towards the heart, the guts are relaxed in the same manner as fear also causeth trembling. Bacon Lo ́OSENESS. . s. [from loose.] 1. State contrary to that of being fast or fixed.

The cause of the casting of skin and shell should seem to be the looseness of the skin or shell, that sticketh not close to the flesh. Bacon. 2. Latitude; criminal levity.

A general looseness of principles and manners hath seized on us like a pestilence, that walketh not in darkness, but at noon-day. Atterbury. 3. Irregularity; neglect of laws.

He endeavoured to win the common people, both by strained curtesy and by looseness of life. Hayward.

4. Lewdness; unchastity.

Courtly court he made still to his dame, Pour'd out in loseness on the grassy ground, Both careless of his health and of his fame.

So loosely, that a quarrel could divide? Dryden. 5. Diarrhea; flux of the belly.

2. Without bandage.

Her golden locks for haste were loosely shed About her ears.

Fairy Queen.

3. Without union or connection.

Spensers

Taking cold moveth looseness by contraction of the skin and outward parts. Bacon.

In pestilent diseases, if they cannot be expelled by sweat, they fall likewise into looseness. Bacon.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

not your lordship my testimony of being the best husband now living. Dryden.

4. Titulary compellation of judges, and some other persons in authority and office.

LORE. 2. S. [from læpan, Saxon, to learn.] Lesson; doctrine; instruction.

And, for the modest lore of maidenhood
Bids me not sojourn with these armed men,
Oh whither shall I fly?
Fairfax.
The law of nations, or the lore of war. Furf.
Calm region once,

And full of peace; now tost, and turbulent!
For understanding rul'd not; and the will
Heard not her lore! but in subjection now
To sensual appetite.
Milton's Par. Lost:
The subtile fiend his bore
Soon learn'd, now milder, and thus answer'd
smooth.
Milton.

Lo! Rome herself, proud mistress now he

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

We should never lose sight of the country, though sometimes entertained with a distant prospect of it.

6. To miss, so as not to find.
Venus wept the sad disaster
Of having lost her fav'rite dove.

Addison.

Prior.

7. To separate or alienate. It is perhaps in this sense always used passively, with to before that from which the separation is made.

But if to honour lest 'tis still decreed

For you my bowl shall flow, my flocks shall bleed;

Judge and assert my right, impartial Jove. Pope. When men are openly abandoned, and lost to all shame, they have no reason to think it hard, if their memory be reproached. 8. To ruin; to send to perdition.

In spite of all the virtue we can boast, The woman that deliberates is lost.

Swift.

Addison.

9. To bewilder, so as that the way is no longer known.

I will go lose myself

And wander up and down to view the city.

Shakspeare. Nor are constant forms of prayer more likely to flat and hinder the spirit of prayer and devotion, than unpremeditated and confused variety to distract and lose it. K. Charles.

When the mind pursues the idea of infinity, it uses the ideas and repetition of numbers, which are so many distinct ideas, kept best by number from running into a confused heap, wherein the mind loses itself. Locke. But rebel wit deserts thee oft in vain, Lost in the maze of words he turns again. Pope. 10. To deprive of.

How should you go about to lose him a wife he loves with so much passion! Temple. 11. Not to employ; not to enjoy.

The happy have whole days, and those they

[blocks in formation]

These sharp encounters, where always many more men are lost than are killed or taken prísoners, put such a stop to Middleton's march, that he was glad to retire. Clarendon.

Parnell

Talk of court news, and we'll talk with them too, Who loses, and who wins; who's in, who's out.

2. To decline; to fail.

Shakspeare.

Wisdom in discourse with her
Loses discountenanc'd, and like folly shews.

Milton. Lo SEABLE. adj. [from lose.] Subject to privation.

Consider whether motion, or a propensity to it, be an inherent quality belonging to atoms in general, and not loseable by them. Boyle. Lo'SEL. n. s. [from lorian, to perish.] A scoundrel; a sorry worthless fellow. Obsolete.

Such losels and scatterlings cannot easily, by any sheriff, be gotten, when they are challenged Spenser. for any such fact.

A losel wand'ring by the way,.
One that to bounty never cast his mind,
Ne thought of honour ever did assay
His baser breast.

Fairy Queen.
Be not with work of losels wit defamed,
Ne let such verses poetry be named. Hub.Tale.
By Cambridge a towne I do know,
Whose losses by lessels doth shew,
More heere then is needful to tell.
A gross hag!

Tusser.

Shakspeare.

And, losel, thou art worthy to be hang'd, That wilt not stay her tongue. Lo'SER. n. s. [from lose.] One that is deprived of any thing; one that forfeits any thing; one that is impaired in his possession or hope: the contrary to vinner or gainer.

With the losers let it sympathize, For nothing can seem foul to those that win. Shakspears

No man can be provident of his time that is not prudent in the choice of his company; and if one of the speakers be vain, tedious, and trif ling, he that hears, and he that answers, are equal losers of their time. Taylor.

It cannot last, because that act seems to have been carried on rather by the interest of particular countries, than by that of the whole, which must be a loser by it. Temple.

A bull with gilded horns,

Shall be the portion of the conquering chief
A sword and helm shall chear the loser's grief.
Dryden.

South.

Losers and malecontents, whose portion and inheritance is a freedom to speak. Loss. n. s. [from lose.]

1. Detriment; privation; diminution of good: the contrary to gain.

The only gain he purchased was to be capable of loss and detriment for the good of others.

Hooker.

An evil natured son is the dishonour of his father that begat him; and a foolish daughter is born to his loss. Ecclesiasticus. The abatement of price of any of the landholder's commodities, lessens his income, and is a clear loss. Locke.

2. Miss; privation.

If he were dead, what would betide of me?
-No other harm but less of such a lord.
-The loss of such a lord includes all harms.
Shakspeare.

17. To be freed from: as, to lose a fever. 3. Deprivation; forfeiture.

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »