Page images
PDF
EPUB

Election for the Third Term, commencing March 4, 1797, and

terminating March 3, 1801.

[ocr errors][merged small]

John Adams, of
Massachusetts.
|Thomas Jefferson,
of Virginia.
Thos. Pinckney, of
South Carolina.
Aaron Burr, of
New York.
Samuel Adams, of
Massachusetts.
Oliver Ellsworth, of
Connecticut.
John Jay, of New
George Clinton, of
New York,
S. Johnston, of
North Carolina.

James Iredell, of
North Carolina.
Geo. Washington,
of Virginia.

C. C. Pinckney, of
South Carolina.
York.

John Henry, of • Maryland.

6 16

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

14

9 4 2

7 15

3 11 21

4 12 8 4 3

13

New Hampshire 6
Massachusetts.. 16
Rhode Island.. 4
Connecticut 9
Vermont ......

4
New York ..... 12
New Jersey 7
Pennsylvania.. 1
Delaware...

3
Maryland.... 7
Virginia

1
Kentucky
North Carolina. 1
South Carolina.
Georgia....
Tennessee..........

4 12 7 2 3 4 1

[blocks in formation]

4 20

4 11 8 4 3

3 1 4 6

[blocks in formation]

1
8

1

[ocr errors]

4

3

[blocks in formation]

John Adams, elected President, took the oath of office, and entered upon his duties, March 4, 1797.

Thomas Jefferson, elected Vice President, took the oath of office, and entered upon his duties in the Senate, March 4, 1797.

The administration of Mr: Adams encountered the most viralent opposition, both domestic and foreign. France, still in the confusion following her revolution, made improper demands on our country, which not being complied with, she commenced seizing American property on the high seas. Our people, taking different sides, were about equally divided-some approving and others deprecating the course pursued by France. Letters of marque and reprisal were issued by our government, and a navy was raised with surprising promptitude. This had the desired effect, peace being thereby secured; and the aggressor was taught that the Americans were friends in peace, but were not fearful of war when it could not be honorably averted.

The Indians on our western frontiers also caused much trouble; but at length, being severely chastised by General Wayne, they sued for peace, which was granted in 1795.

In 1800 the seat of government was removed from Philadel. phia to Washington City, which had been designated by Wash. ington, under a law of Congress, as the most central situation.

[ocr errors]

THE THIRD PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, Was born at Shadwell, Albemarle County, Virginia (near Monticello, the seat where he died), April 13, 1743. He was educated at William and Mary's College, and graduated with distinction when quite young. He was a great lover of learning, and particularly of natural philosophy. With the celebrated George Wythe, he commenced the study of the law, and became a favorite pupil. Mr. Jefferson was never distinguished as an advocate, but was considered a good lawyer. Soon after he came to the bar he was elected a member of the House of Burgesses, and, in that body, was duly appreciated for his learning and aptitude for business. He at once took fire at British oppression, and, in 1774, he employed his pen in discussing the whole course of the British ministry. The work was admired, and made a text-book by his countrymen. In June, 1775, he took his seat in the Continental Congress, from Virginia. In that body he soon became conspicuous, and was considered a firm friend of American liberty. In 1776, he was chosen chairman of the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence. This instrument is nearly all his own, and was sanctioned by his coadjutors, with few alterations. In 1778, Mr. Jefferson was appointed embassador to France, to form a treaty with that government, but ill-health prevented his accepting this office. He succeded Patrick Henry, in 1779, as Governor of Virginia, and continued in that station two years. In 1781 he composed his notes on Virginia. In 1783 he was sent to Francé to join the ministers of our country, Mr. Adams and Dr. Franklin. In 1785 he succeeded Dr. Franklin as embassador, and continued performing the duties of that office for two years, when he retired, and returned home. In 1789 he was made Secretary of State, under Washington, in which situation he was highly distinguished for his talents. This station he resigned in 1793, and retired to private life. In 1797 he was elected Vice-President of the United States, and took his seat as President of the Senate, on the following 4th of March. In 1801, he was President of the United States, which office he held for eight years. After completing his second term, he retired to private life, in which he spent his days in philosophical pursuits, until the 4th of July, 1826, when he expired, just fifty years after pending the Declaration of Independence. His course was one of his own. Never lived there a politician who did more than Thomas Jefferson to bring his fellowcitizens to his own opinions.

Eiotion for the Fourth Term, commencing March 4, 1801, and

terminating March 3, 1805.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The electoral vote for Thos. Jefferson and Aaron Burr being equal, no choice was made by the people, and on the 11th of February, 1601, the House of Representatives proceeded to the choice of President in the manner prescribed by the Constitution. On the first ballot eight States voted for Thos. Jefferson, six for Aaron Burr, and the votes of two States were divided. The balloting continued till the 17th of February, when the thirty-fifth ballot, as had all previously, resulted the same as the first. After the thirty-sixth ballot, the Speaker declared that the votes of ten States had been given for Thos. Jefferson, the votes of four States for Aaron Burr, and the votes of two States in blank; and that, consequently, Thomas Jefferson had been elected for the term of four years.

Thomas Jefferson, thus elected President, took the oath of office, and entered upon his duties, March 4, 1801.

In his inaugural address, Mr. Jefferson used the following memcrable expres. slon: “We have called by different names brethren of the same principle. Wo are all republicans: we are all federalists. If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union, or to change its republican form, let them stand, undisturbed, as monuments of the safety with which ERROR OF OPINION MAY BÍ

Aaron Buis, elected Vice-President, took tho oath of office, and entered upon bis duties io tho Seuate, March 4, 1801.

TULERATED, WHERE REASON IS LEFT FREE TO COMBAT IT."

mlection for the Fifth Term, commencing March 4, 1805, and

terminating March 3, 1819.

PRESID’T. V. PRES’T.

Xo. of Mlectors from

each Btate.

STATES.

Thomas Jefferson, of
Virginia.

:!:07: Charles C. Pinckney,

George Clinton of of South New York.

JYork.

606: 1:07. Rufus King, of New

7 19 4

10

6 19

8 20

6 19

8 20

7 New Hampshire.................
19 Massachusetts.....................................
4 Rhode Island.....................................
9 Connecticut.......................................
6 Vermont.........................................
19 New York........................................

8 New Jersey: ....................................
20 Pennsylvania.

.................................. 3

Delaware..... ...................................... 11 Maryland.......................................... 24 Virginia... 14 North Carolina....................................... 10 South Oarolina...................................... 6 Georgia............................................... 5 Tennessee............................................ 8 Kentucky..

......................................... 3 Obio..........................

[ocr errors][merged small]

......................................

....

9 24 14 10 6 5 8 3

9 24 14 10 6 6 8 3

[ocr errors]

176 Whole No. of Electors..............

Majority..

162 14 162

14

89

[ocr errors]

Thomas Jefferson, elected President, took the oath of office for a second term, and entered upon his duties March 4, 1805.

George Clinton, elected Vice-President, took the oath of office, and entered upon his duties in the Senate, March 4, 1805.

Among the most important acts of Mr. Jefferson's administration was the purchase of Louisiana from France for $15,000,000, which territory was surrendered to our Government in December, 1803.

In November, 1808, the celebrated "ORDERS IN COUNCIL” were issued by the British Government, which prohibited all trade with France and her allies; and, as a retaliatory measure, in December following Bonaparte issued his “MILAN DECREE," interdicting all trade with England and her colonies—thus subjecting almost every American vessel on the ocean to capture. in requital for these tyrannous proceedings, and that England and France might both feel their injustice, Congress decreed an embargo; but as this failed to obtain from either power an acknowledgment of our rights, and was also ruinous to our com. merce with other nations, it was repealed in March, 1809.

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »