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same year he gave his entertainments in this building. After the Derby family ceased to occupy the Tower, it was used for the public assemblies, and ultimately in the year 1737 it was converted into the gaol, to which purpose tinued to be appropriated until the year 1811, when the French prison in Great Howard-street was assigned to that use. This ancient edifice, once the abode of affluence and splendour, of mirth and gaiety, after being transformed into the receptacle of sorrow and despondency, was finally taken down in the year 1819, and not a vestige of it is now to be found.

The site on which it formerly stood is said to have consisted of about 3700 square yards, and is at present occupied by a fine suite of warehouses. Near the Tower was an ecliptic arch, built of stone, forming the entrance into Tower-garden, and evidently of great antiquity, but it and some adjoining old houses were taken down at the same time the Tower was removed.

In the year 1203 a charter was granted by king John to this borough, the original of which is still preserved in the archives of the town; and eight years later king Henry III., on condition of receiving a fine of ten marks, established the town and corporation a free borough for ever. The same monarch afterwards, in 1228, granted another charter, which directs that there shall be a Guild, and excludes all, who are not members

of it, from the privilege of carrying on merchandise here, unless by permission of the burgesses.

Of the various natives and residents of Liverpool, there appears to have been no family more ancient, distinguished, or influential than the Mores, who for a long period evinced the most lively interest for the welfare of their native town. It appears that in the year 1235, Sir John de la More, knight, inhabited the old Hall, situate in Oldhall-street: and that in 1280 Bank Hall was built for the residence of this family, and continued to be inhabited by them until about the year 1698. At the battle of Poictiers, 1356, Edward the Black Prince made Sir William de la More knight and banneret ; and in 93, John of Ghaunt granted to Thomas de la More of I iverpool, Robert de Derby, Reid de Stulen, William de Roby, all Liverpool commons, Simmonswood, &c., which grant was confirmed by Henry IV. And five years after this period Thomas de la More, of Bank-Hall had enjoyed the honour of being twelve times the chief magistrate of this borough. Seacombe in his Memoirs of the House of Stanley, tells us that in 1644, Colonel Moore, under the Commonwealth, had the command of the town, which he defended for some time against prince Rupert, who must have raised the siege had not Colonel Moore surrendered it to save his house and effects at Bank-Hall. In the year 1709 Sir John Moore, an alderman of London, (who is said to have been no relation of the family,) as mortgagee sold the property pertaining to the Mores in the borough of Liverpool, as well as in thirteen adjoining townships, and

among the purchasers were the earl of Derby, John Earle, Richard Gildart, and Thomas Plumbe, Esq.

The most ancient and regular series of records in the possession of the corporation, we believe go no further back than the year 1555. Prior to this period nothing of great import appears to pertain to Liverpool, a place whose name is rarely met with in the general history of the country. One of these records states that, in the year 1565, it was a poor obscure village, having only one hundred and thirty eight householders and cottagers. About this time it appears that there were only seven streets in the town that were inhabited, containing 138 cottages, and 690 inhabitants, viz. Chapel-street, Bancke-street, (the present Water-street,) Moor-street, (now called Tithebarn-street,) Castle-street, Dale-street, Juggler-street, (now called High-street,) and Mylnestreet, previously named Peppard-street, (now called Oldhall-street.) And six years afterwards the inhabitants presented a petition to Queen Elizabeth, in which they supplicate an exemption from the subsidy laid on them, styling them. selves “inhabitants of her Majesty's poor decayed town of Liverpool."

The number of ships belonging to the port at this period is given as follows :

1 Vessel of 40 tons, and 12 men.
1

36 ....... 10
1
30

8
1
20

7
1
16

6
3
15

16
2
12

10
2
8

6

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12
177

75 There were belonging to Wallasey :

1 Bark of 14 tons, and 6 men.
1
14

5
1

3

12

3
40

14 Shortly after the time the above-mentioned petition was presented, we find an account of an entertainment given by the Mayor to the Earl of Derby, Mr Grosvenor of Eaton, and many others. It also appears that the Earl of Derby then resided at the Tower in Water-street. In the succeeding year it was ordered that there should be a handsome cock-fight pit made, as an inducement for gentlemen and others to repair to the town; likewise that the butts and stocks be kept in due repair.

Ale and beer were to be sold at a penny per quart, and the cattle market

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was to be held at the Castle, and not within the town. In this year also six hundred and fifty horse soldiers, besides many foot soldiers, embarked at Liverpool for the north of Ireland, to put down the rebels : one of the most distinguished traitors, named John Neale, was taken and put to death. Six years after this period, it is related that the town was frequently in great commotion, in consequence of the quarrels that often arose between the inhabitants and some soidiers who had been sent hither to be embarked for Ireland. About the same time the Earl of Essex, the favourite of Queen Elizabeth, passed through this place on his way to Carrickfergus.

In the next year, 1574, a municipal regulation was made, strikingly characteristic of the manners of the people of that age, as well as of the authoritative tone of the magistrate : an injunction was put forth, in which it was ordered, bachelor, apprentice, or servant should walk out after nine o'clock at night without lawful business.”

What a contrast this presents to the manners and practices of the inhabitants at the

present day. Two years afterwards, it was decreed that horse races should be held an. nually upon Ascension-day, and the prize to be run for was a silver bell.

It appears to have been the custom, about this period, to lay a rate on the inhabitants to defray the expenses of the representatives of the borough

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