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CUMBERLAND'S

BRITISH THEATRE,

WITH

Remarks, Biographical and Critical.

PRINTED FROM THE ACTING Copies,

AS PERFORMED AT THE

THEATRES-ROYAL, LONDON.

VOL. XI.

BRUTUS
ALI PACHA.
TWELFTH NIGHT.
HENRY THE FIFTH.
LOVE IN HUMBLE LIFE.
CHILD OF NATURE.
THE SLEEP WALKER.

EMBELLISHED WITH A PORTRAIT OF MR. KEAN;

AND SEVEN ORIGINAL WOOD ENGRAVINGS.

LONDON:

JOHN CUMBERLAND, 19, LUDGATE HILL.

1826.

Jurvard College Lib ary
Dec 26, 907.

wift 0
Frank Buge', Ohasa

of Boston

31-1941

// - /

BRUTUS,

OR,

THE FALL OF TARQUIN;

AN HISTORICAL TRAGEDY,

En five Acts,

BY JOHN HOWARD PAYNE, ESQ.

PRINTED FROM THE ACTING COPY, WITH REMARKS, BIOGRAPHICAL AND

CRITICAL, BY D.-G.

To which are added, h A DESCRIPTION OF THE COSTUME,-CAST OF THE CHARACTERS, ENTRANCES AND EXITS, -RELATIVE POSITIONS OF THE PERFORMERS ON THE STAGE, AND THE WHOLE OF THE STAGE

BUSINESS.

As now performed at the

THEATRES ROYAL, LONDON:

EMBELLISHED WITH A PORTRAIT OF MR. KEAN,

IN THE CHARACTER OF JUNIUS BRUTUS.

Engraved on Steel by MR. WOOLNOTH, from an original Drawing

by MR. WAGEMAN.

LONDON:

JOHN CUMBERLAND, 19, LUDGATE HILL,

REMARKS.

Brutus. VARIOUS bave been the opinions regarding the stoics. Some have exclaimed

" And we shall fiod, trace passions to their root,

Small difference 'twixt the stoic and the brute;" While others have pursued the opposite extreme, and elevated them amongst the gods. The course of the stoic, like the eagle's flight, is solitary and sublime. He has that painfal pre-eminence

“ Himself to view, Above life's troubles, and its comforts too." For, as pleasure and pain exist only in the contrast they present to each other, the stoic, by becoming insensible to both, may be equable, but never can be happy. Whether this be an enviable state of existence-whether it be nobler to look down upon the good and evil of life with equal indifference—to regard mankind with dignified apathy-to sacrifice every tie of nature, friendship, and feeling, to one arbitrary and undeviating rule of right-we leave to the decision of less sangaine temperaments than our own. We have not yet so much the Roman in us! But, if we were to venture an opinion, we should say

is sT'is pride, rank pride, and haughtiness of soul :

We think the Romans call it stoicism." Under such withering influence, every generous sentiment of the soul would be annibilated:

“ The tear which pity taught to flow,

The eye would then disown;
The heart that melts for others' woe,

Would then scarce feel its own." But, exclaims a poet who had imbibed an ardent love for the vir. tues of Greece and Rome

" What think yon 'twas set up
The Greek and Roman name in such a lustre,
But doing right, in stern despite to nature;
Shutting their ears against her little cries,

When great, august, and godlike justice call’d?" This, however, must be considered as a favourable picture of stoicisa; and foremost among the illustrious characters of antiquity that have achieved this hard triumph, stands Brutus, who

" The theme of all succeeding times,

Gave to the cruel axe a darling son !” Such an example, however it may raise our veneration, must not be fixed as the standard of human excellence: it must be regarded as a prodigy, a moral wonder of the world, towering above the frailties and affections that are the mixed lot of humanity.

Seven wealthy towns contend for Homer dead,”and no fewer than seven plays contend for the honour of having introduced this interesting subject to the stage. Tbey are of various

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