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Filing
Attending button-maker, instructing him .
Paid his charges
Having received summons to proceed, perusing and con-

sidering same
Drawing consent and copy to keep .
Postage .
Copy order thereon and entering .
Appointing consultation as to further proceedings, and at-

tending same.
Foreman having filed a demurrer, preparing argument

against same.
Attending long argument on demurrer, when same over-

ruled
Perusing foreman's plea.
Excepting to same
Entering exceptions
Perusing notice of motion to remove suit, and preparing

valid objections to lay before you.
Same being overruled, consent thereto on an undertaking
Expenses on removal of suit, paid by you at the time
Writing you my extreme dissatisfaction at finding the suit

removed into the King's Bench, and that I should move
the court, when you promised to obtain a rule as soon as

term commenced, and attend me thereon Conferring with

you,

in
presence

of your attendant, at my house, on the first day of term, when you succeeded in satisfying me that you were a Gent. one, etc., and an honorable

man, and expressed great dissatisfaction at the proceedings had with the suit while out of my hands; receiving your instructions to demand of your uncle that same should return to me, on my paying a lien he claimed thereon, and received from you his debenture for that

purpose Perusing same, and attending him in St. George's Fields

therewith and thereon Paid him, principal and interest In consideration of circumstances, no charge for receiving

suit back .. Perusing letter unexpectedly received from

you,

dated from your own house, respecting short notice of trial. Attending you thereon Attending at Westminster several mornings to try the suit,

when at last got same on.

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Paid fees.
Fee to porter
It being determined that the suit should be put into a special

case, drawing special instructions to box-maker for same.
Attending him therewith and thereon
Paid him his fee for special case
Paid his clerk's fee
Considering case as settled.
Attending foreman for his consent to same, when he prom-

ised to determine shortly.
Attending him again thereon to obviate his objections, and

obtained his consent with difficulty
Drawing bill of costs.
Fair copy for Mr.

to peruse and settle
Attending him therewith
Fee to him settling
Attending him for same .
Perusing and considering the same as settled
Attending Mr. - again, suggesting amendments
Fees to him on amending
Perusing same as amended.
Fair copy, with amendments, to keep
Entering .
Fair copy for service.
Thirty-eight various attendances to serve same .
Service thereof.
Drawing memorandum of service
Attending to enter same.
Entering same .
Attending you concerning same .
Accepted service of order to attend at the theatre, and gave

consent.
Retaining-fee at box-office .
Service of order on box-keeper
Self and wife, with six children, two of her cousins, her

brother and his son, two of my brothers, my sister-in-law,
three nephews, four nieces, each attending for four hours
and a half to see the “Road to Ruin” and the “ Beggars'
Opera," eighty-five hours and a half, at 3s. 4d. per hour

- very moderate Coach-hire there and back . Attending you to acquaint you with particulars in general,

and concerning settlement particularly . Instructions for receipt

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To numerous, various, and a great variety of divers and

very many letters, messages, and attendances to, from, on, and upon, you and your agents and others, pending a negotiation for settlement, far too numerous to be mentioned; and an infinite deal of trouble, too troublesome to trouble you with, or to be expressed, without more and further trouble, but which you must, or can, or shall, or may know or be informed of, what you please

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The ruthless reformers of these evil days have done away with any necessity for the foregoing as a precedent, but it may serve to remind the profession of that paradise of compensation from which theoretically they have been ejected. The lawyers used to be paid in proportion to the number of words they employed. So naturally they never were distinguished for conciseness. As the hackman carries the stranger roundabout so as to make a large demand, so the ancient lawyer beat about the bush with his verbal tediousness. Nowadays he goes straighter to his destination, but the fare seems about as high as ever.

DEATH OF SAMPSON BRASS. I take it for granted that every lawyer is acquainted with Mr. Sampson Brass, the attorney of Dickens's “Old Curiosity Shop.” Our concluding burlesque will relate to him. It is somewhat notorious that there is one occasion on which all the lawyers speak well of any other particular member of the profession; and that is, when he is dead, and his survivors hold a “bar-meeting" over him. According to such meetings, no bad lawyer has ever died; and this may account for the lowered tone of the profession, which the good editors of newspapers are so unanimously lamenting in these days. Mr. John C. Greene of Troy, N.Y., some years ago discovered, and transmitted to “The Albany Law Journal” for publication, an account of the proceedings of the bar on the death of Mr. Brass; and by his permission, I reproduce it here :

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“POSTHUMOUS JUSTICE. “The bales of old paper and rags gathered from the ends of the earth, to be worked up' by Yankee mills, are full of curiosities. The chiffonier's hook penetrates, sooner or later, the most secret places, and brings up to the light many strange matters, — bundles of letters tied with faded ribbon ; huge rolls of manuscript, 'rejected' (when their rejection meant starvation perhaps), and gathered from publishers' waste-baskets ; quaint and curious volumes of forgotten lore ; account-books of defunct firms; pamphlets and tracts without number. Do you ever think, brother, upon what a weird palimpsest you are drawing your little innocent bill of costs, or your coldblooded affidavit? No, not you.

“Not long since, while visiting the extensive works of my friends Pulp & Co. of Pulpville, the distinguished paper-manufacturers, in a huge pile of material about to be placed in the bleacher, I noticed and picked up a pamphlet, which, as it contained many familiar names, attracted my attention, and interested me at once. It is entitled 'Proceedings and Resolutions of a meeting of the Attorneys and Solicitors of London, upon the death of Sampson Brass, Esq., late of Bevis Marks,' and contains the speeches and resolutions made upon that melancholy occasion. I regret that the proceedings are too lengthy to be published entire in this journal; but as they are, I have made a synopsis of the more important parts, which I hasten to present to my professional brethren.

“The pamphlet appears to have been prepared by a reporter who was present. It begins with the statement that the meeting was largely attended, and was impressive in its solemnity. Among those present were observed the Hon. T. Traddles, one of the barons of the exchequer ; Mr. Conversation Kenge and Mr. Carboy of Lincoln's Inn; Mr. Dodson and Mr. Fogg of Freeman's Court; Mr. Perker of Gray's Inn ; Mr. Vholes of Furnival's Inn; Mr. Witherden, Mr. Abel Garland, Mr. Jaggers, Mr. Wemick, Mr. Solomon Pell, Mr. Mortimer Lightwood, of the Temple ; Mr. Guppy, and many others.

““The meeting was organized by calling to the chair the Hon. Baron Traddles, who said, upon taking his seat, “Again, gentlemen, pallid death has visited our profession; and we are called upon to pay the last tribute of respect to a departed brother.

This occasion is one of more than ordinary interest and solemnity. Our distinguished brother, Mr. Tupton Tulkinghorn, after a long life of assiduous devotion to his profession, has passed to his reward. Mr. Tulkinghorn was a man of no common mould. He brought to the conduct of his business great

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