The Philosophical Works of Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Albans ...: Methodized, and Made English, from the Originals. With Occasional Notes, to Explain what is Obscure ...

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J.J. and P. Knapton, 1733

From inside the book

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Whether the Celestial
29
The Neutrality of the Scripture
35
Flame in Ether permanent
41
A Free Cenfure or Critique of the more eminent
47
The Character of Aquinas Plato
53
Striking the Senſe
58
That the Author has been in ear
59
SECT
65
The Advantages of Friendship
71
4 To the Sovereign or State
73
A Rule for diffolving Bodies ibid Exemplified in the Nutrition
75
Their Enlargements
82
Moving the Paffions
87
The Deformed Illegitimate
88
Its Tides
90
No Matter hot in itself
95
The Fear of Death weak
100
Errors and Poverty in Conver
105
Garden and Grotto
109
Some Men fitter for Cunning than
111
Action in Oratory compared
112
The three Parts of Business
113
Of Nature and
121
Of Education
125
Difcoveries may be expected from No great Time and Treasure
126
Of Buildings
127
Infirmaries
129
A fuppofed Prediction of
135
ESSAYS upon Political SUBJECTS
137
How ambitious Men are to
143
Followers of the fame Order with
146
How to decline Envy
147
Gentry
153
Of Innovations
154
The Way of redeeming a Mort
159
The Bold are Empiricks in
164
SUPPLEMENT XII
165
c
167
Anger not to be exftinguished
170
The Cafe ftated
173
Shewn by Experience ibid
177
ibid
182
Ireland invaded by the Pope in The Battle of Kingfale in 1601
184
ibid
189
SUPPLEMENT XIII
191
No Place of Jurifdiction to
197
Mercantile Negotiations
202
68
203
The Neceffity and Vfe of Prime A General Direction for their Con
204
What their Diftan
206
ibid
210
A Propofal for a new Digeſt of the Laws of England
213
By forfaking the past Errors 576
215
Thofe who win their Honours hard
222
That Men may form juft Defini
227
The Procedure of Superftition 94
229
The Kings Bench when first infti
235
The Second
239
Their Office
242
The Law of England better than
244
Every Heir having Land is bound
245
Office of Alienation
251
Property by Gift
260
Inftances of the Tyranny of
262
The Punishments and Proceedings
266
Cafes of Præmunire
272
The Kings Prerogative in Parli In Matters of Trade and Traffick
273
Alienation of Hearts
280
Matrimony
317
INSTAURATION
323
Aphorifms for a juft Interpreta Interferes not with the Ancients
332
Holds for the Mind
337
The State of the Ancient Philofo
339
General Aphorifms for Interpreting Nature and Extending the Empire
343
Confutations where of no Service
350
The Method here propofed not used
357
The Origin of Errors
361
Plantations heroical Works ibid
369
Does not destroy the Sciences already
374
Of the Cauſes of Errors in PHILOSOPHIES
375
The Voyages of the Moderns ibid
381
11 Want of proposing worthy
385
The goodness of the Defign a
391
And a HoufboldPart ibid
396
The Understanding to be kept
397
Ordnance
399
16 Often
405
The Progress of the Side for
408
The CourtFard how to be built
409
The Objection that the prefent
411
The great Advantage of the pre
413
Leffer Forms of Helps for the
414
SECT I
423
Not to People with Felons Out
428
Unregarded in the Sciences
429
The Foundation of the Whole laid
432
e 2
435
The Appearance of new Stars
450
432
454
The Notion of Forms limited
455
Exclufion leads to Induction
458
2
468
Where the Senfe is full charged
472
Lead to Practice
473
Exemplified in the Subject of Tafte
474
Thefe Changes not justly aſſigned
478
Latent Process what
481
Men and Plants
484
Admonitions relating to them
487
14 Crucial Inftances
493
The Motion of Projectiles
499
Magnetical Action an Inftance
503
152
504
175
507
Imperceptible Heat or Coldbrought
511
Reduction fometimes made to
512
SUPPLE
514
Way
518
Motions that differ comparatively
524
Exemplified in the Action
527
Nutrition how performed ibid
535
The Manner and Proportion where
542
The Trades to plant with ibid
543
566
544
This Action defcribed
545
Bodies potentially cold
548
The Force of Custom greatest
549
To be duly collected
554
Effay
562
The Elements of Things
564
The Defign of the Work
568
33
569
The first Part divided into feven
570
The Reasons there are to expect
576
The Occafion of that Work ibid
580
Means of rectifying Induction
586

Common terms and phrases

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Էջ 66 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. That is, some books are to. be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy and extracts made of them by others, but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books; else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things.
Էջ 144 - Certainly great persons had need to borrow other men's opinions, to think themselves happy; for if they judge by their own feeling, they cannot find it: but if they think with themselves what other men think of them, and that other men would fain be as they are, then they are happy as it were by report ; when perhaps they find the contrary within. For they are the first that find their own griefs, though they be the last that find their own faults.
Էջ 411 - There is no small difference between the idols of the human mind, and the ideas of the divine mind ; that is to say between certain idle dogmas, and the real stamp and impression of created objects, as they are found in nature.
Էջ 285 - He believes three to be one, and one to be three; a Father not to be elder than his son; a Son to be equal with his Father...
Էջ 70 - But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company, and faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Էջ 303 - ... there be as well schismatical fashions as opinions. First, they have impropriated unto themselves the names of zealous, sincere, and reformed ; as if all Others were cold minglers of holy things and profane. and friends of abuses. Yea, be a man endued with great virtues, and fruitful in good works ; yet if he concur not with them, they term him, in derogation, a civil and moral man, and compare him to Socrates, or some heathen philosopher: whereas the wisdom of the Scriptures teacheth us...
Էջ 87 - that we are commanded to forgive our enemies ; but you never read, that we are commanded to forgive our friends.
Էջ 66 - ... the like. So if a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics ; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again. If his wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the schoolmen ; for they are cymini sectores. If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study the lawyers
Էջ 206 - ... 6. But instead of crying up all things, which are either brought from beyond sea, or wrought here by the hands of strangers, let us advance the native commodities of our own kingdom, and employ our countrymen before strangers ; let us turn the wools of the land into clothes and stuffs of our own growth...
Էջ 380 - ... accounted antiquity; and ought to be attributed to our own times, not to the youth of the world, which it enjoyed among the ancients : for that age, though, with respect to us, it be ancient and greater; yet, with regard to the world, it was new and less. And as we justly expect a greater knowledge of things, and a riper judgment, from a man of years, than from a youth, on account of the greater experience, and the greater variety and number of things seen, heard, and thought of, by the person...