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ble for the death of her husband, was resolved to take this leap in order to get rid of her passion for his memory; but being

arrived at the promontory, she there met with Dimmachus the Milesian, and, after a short conversation with him, laid aside the thoughts of her leap, and married him in the temple of Apollo.

N. B. Her widow's weeds are still seen hanging up in the western corner of the temple.

Olphis the fisherman, having received a box on the ear from Thestylis the day before, and being determined to have no more to do with her, leaped and escaped with life.

Atalanta, an old maid, whose cruelty had several years before driven two or three despairing lovers to this leap; being now in the fifty-fifth year of her age, and in love with an officer of Sparta, broke her neck in the fall.

Hipparch's, being passionately fond of his own wife, who was enamoured of

Bathyllus, leaped, and died of his fall; upon which, his wife married her gallant.

Tettyx, the dancing-master, in love with Olympia, an Athenian matron, threw himself from the rock with great agility, but was crippled in the fall.

Diagoras, the usurer, in love with his cookmaid: he peeped several times over the precipice, but his heart' misgiving him, he went back, and married her that evening.

Cinædus, after having entered his own name in the Pythian records, being asked the name of the person whom he leaped for, and being asham ed to discover it, he was set aside, and not suffer ed to leap

Eunica, a maid of Paphos, aged nineteen, in love with Eury bates. Hurt in the fall, but recovered.

N. B. This was the second time of her leaping. Hesperus, a young man of Tarentum, in love with his master's daughter. Drowned, the boats not coming in soon enough to his relief. Sappho,

the Lesbian, in love with Phaon, arrived at the temple of Apollo, habited like a bride in garments as white as snow.

She wore a garland of myrtle on her head, and carried in her hand the little musical instrument of her own invention. After having sung a hymn to Apollo, she hung up her garland on one side of his altar, and her harp on the other. She then tucked up her vestments like a Spartan virgin, and amidst thousands of spectators, who were anxious for her safety, and offered up vows for her deliverance, marched directly forwards to the utmost summit of the promontory, where after having repeated a stanza of her own verses, which we could not hear, she threw herself off the rock with such an intrepidity as was never before observed in any who had attempted that dangerous leap. Many who were present related, that they saw her fall into the sea, from whence she never rose again; though there were others who affirmed, that she never came to the bottom of her leap, but that she was changed into a swan as she fell, and that they saw her hovering in the air under that shape. But whether or no the whiteness and fluttering of her garments might not deceive those who looked upon her, or whether she might not really be metamorphosed into that musical and melancholy bird, is still a doubt among the Lesbians.

Alcæus, the famous lyric poet, who had for some time been passionately in love with Sappho, arrived at the promontory of Leucate that very evening, in order to take the leap upon her account; but hearing that Sappho had been there before him, and that her body could be no where found, he very generously lamented her fall, and is said to have written his hundred and twentyfifth ode

upon

that occasion.
Leaped in this Olympiad 250.
Males

124
Females 126
Cured

120 Male's

51 Females 69 ADDISON.

C.

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No. 234. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28

Vellem in amicitia sic erraremus.

HOR.

i wish this error in our friendship reign'd. CRLECH. You very often hear people, after a story has been told with some entertaining circumstances, tell it over again with particulars that destroy the jest, but give light into the truth of the narration.

This sort of veracity, though it is impertinent has something amiable in it, because it proceeds from the love of truth, even in frivolous occasions. If such honest amendments do not promise an agreeable companion, they do a sincere

friend; for which reason one should allow them so much of our time, if we fall into their company, as to set us right in matters that can do us no manner of harm, whether the facts be one way or the other. Lies, which are told out of arrogance and ostentation, a man should detect in his own defence, because he should not be tri. umphed over; lies which are told out of malice he should expose, both for his own sake and that of the rest of mankind, because every man should rise against a common enemy; but the officious liar, many have argued, is to be excused, because it does some man good, and no man hurt. The man who made more than ordinary speed from a fight in which the Athenians were beaten, and told them they had obtained a complete victory, arıd put the whole city into the utmost joy and exultation, was checked by the magistrates for his falsehood; but excused himself by saying, 0 A thenians! am I your enemy because I gave you tivo happy days?' This fellow did to a whole people what an acquaintance of mine does every day he lives, in some eminent degree to particular persons. He is ever lying people into good humour, and as Plato said it was allowable in physicians to lie to their patients to keep up their spirits, I am half doubtful whether my friend's behaviour is not as excusable. His manner is to express himself surprised at the cheerful countenance of a man whom he observes diffident of himself, and generally by that means makes his lie a truth. He will, as if he did not know any tlung of the circumstance, ask one whom he knows at variance with another, what is the meaning that Mr. Such-a-one, naming his adversary,

VOL. V.-7

Alcæus, the famous lyric poet, who had for some time been passionately in love with Sappho, arrived at the promontory of Leucate that very evening, in order to take the leap upon her account; but hearing that Sappho had been there before him, and that her body could be no where found, he very generously lamented her fall, and is said to have written his hundred and twentyfifth ode upon that occasion. Leaped in this Olympiad 250. Males

121 Females 126 Cured

120 Males

51 Females 69

C.

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ADDISON.

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i wish this error in our friendship reign'd. CREECH. You very often hear people, after a story has been told with some entertaining circumstances, tell it over again with particulars that destroy the jest, but give light into the truth of the narration.

This sort of veracity, though it is impertinent has something amiable in it, because it proceed. from the love of truth, even in frivolous sions. If such honest amendments do no mise an agreeable companion, they do a

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