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COMPARATIVE PRICES OF MIDDLING TO FAIR COTTON, AT NEW ORLEANS, ON THE

FIRST OF EACH MONTH, DERING A PERIOD OF FIVE YEARS-TOGETHER WITH TOTAL RECEIPTS AT NEW ORLEANS, AND THE TOTAL CROPS OF THE UNITED STATES.

1845.46. 1814-15. 1819-44. 1842-13. 1811-42. Monthy.

Cents,
Cents.
Cents.
Cents.

Cents. September ...... 77 a 88 6

54 a 8 6 a October....... 63 83 54 a

7 a

64 a 8 87 a 98 November...... 7 a 8

55 a
6% 64 a
8 54 a

87 a 101 December...... 61 a

61 7} a

54 a

81 a 10 January.

6, а
73 43 a 61 8 a 10+ 5} a

8 a 91 February 43 a 6.1 8 a 10 55 a 7

74 a 10 March... 6} a 87 5 a 61

91 41 a 7 64 a 10 April..

54 a 71 7, а 94 45 a 73 74 a May 61 a 85 54 a 74 61 a 83 51 a

64 a 10 61 a 8 55 a 74 a s} 53 a 8

61 a 10 July........... 61 a 8 61 a 73 6 a 87 53 a 8

64 a 10 August........ 7 a 81 6a 73 61 a 8 5 a 8

64 a

7 a

81 a

65 a

June .......

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COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SUGAR ON THE LEVEE, AT NEW ORLEANS, ON THE 1st

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Months.
September........
October.......
November....
December.....
January.....
February.
March..
April......
May..
June
July.
August ...

1815-16.

Cents.
6

a 64
6
5 7
4 61
44 a 61
4
4 64
4 a 67
4} a 67
4 a 61
4 a 65
41 a 77

1814-15.

Cents.
5 a 67
5 a
4 a 54
3 5
23 a 5+
2 a 51
3 a 51
5
5 a 63
4. a 63
41 a 61
5) a 7

1813.41.

Cents. 51 a 64 6

а 7
5

а 61
41 a 6+
44 a 73
5 71
5 а 71
54 a
5) a 75

1842-43.

Cents. 2

a 43 4

a 64 31 a 6 31 a 44 3 a 41 34 a 5 34 a 5 31 a 5 31 a 55 41 a 55 45 a

1811-12.

Cents. 43 a 64

7 41 a 7 41 a 61 4 a 6 3

a 51 3 51 3

a 64

a

a

a

67
44 a 67
41 a 64

6
5 a 61

a 51 3 a 51 2 a 51 2 a 51 2 a 41

COMPARATIVE PRICES OF MOLASSES ON THE LEVEE, AT NEW ORLEANS, ON THE

IST OF EACH MONTH FOR FIVE YEARS.

a 28

a 21

a 27 a 24

a 21

1815.46.

Cents.
24
21
21 22
20
21 a 211
21 a 211
22 a 23
25 a 254
23 a 231
18
15
15

Months.
September......
October..
November
December....
January..
February....
March......
April..
May......
June
July......
August.

1814-45.

Cents.
26
24 a 26
20 a 21
201 a 201
16 a 17
14) & 16
201 a 21
25
24 a 27
18 a 27
20 a 27
26

1813-11.

Cents.
18
23
14 a 201
20 a 21
22, a 23
22 a 23
23
23
25 a 261
24
24

a 26
254 a 264

1812-13.

Cents. 10 a 12

9 a 11 11 a 17 14 a 151 12 a 131 13 a 14 11 a 12) 15 a 16 15. a 16 17) a 19 19 a 22 20 a 22

1841-42.

Cents. 20 a 23 20 a 25 18 a 26 19 a 20

18 16 a 17

17 14 a 15 10 a 13 a 16 12 a 14 lla 13

17 a

16 a

a 24 a 25

a 26

a 25

a 22 a 20 a 21

a 28

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COMPARATIVE PRICES OF FLOUR, AT NEW ORLEANS, on IST OF EACH MONTH, FOR FIVE YEARS.

181.46. 1844-45. 1813-44. 1812-43. 1841-42.
Months.

Dollars.
Dollars.
Dollars.
Dollars.

Dollars.
September........ 31 a 41 a 6 45 a 41 4} a 45

64 a

7
October......

3 a
41 3 a 43 4 a 43

34 a

33 64 a 64
November
41 a 51 4 44 a 41

4

51
December....... 71 a 81 4 a

44 a 41 41 a 61 a 63
January,
54 a 7 40 a 55 43 a 41 4

64 a
February....
5 a 67 31 a 41

45 a

3 a 31 54 a 51
March......
49 a 51 4 a

44 a 48 3 a 31 5 55
April.,
43 a 5 31 a 45 44 a 41

3} a

4 5 a 5%
May.

4 a 44 33 a 41 45 a 41 34 a 33 45 a 44
June
3 a 41 38 a 3) a 33 4f a

54 a 6
July.........

3 a 4
3 a 43 3} a 41 45 a 57 43 a

5
August..

31 a 4

a 43 4 a 51 4 41 4 a 41
COMPARATIVE PRICES OF MESS AND PRIME PORK, AT NEW ORLEANS, ON THE IST OF EACH

MONTH, FOR TWO YEARS.
1845-16.

1844-45.
Months.

Mess.
Prime.

Mess.

Prime.
September....... $17 a 173 13 13)

9

61 a 64
October.....

16
114 a 121

9

61 a 61
November
144 a 141 101 a 11

91 a 10 7) a
December...
15) a 16 131 a

9 a 10

7

it
January..
15), a 154 134 a 14

91 a

8
February.
101 a 11 9 a 10

10 a

8
March.....
101 a 11 94 a 10

11

9 a
April...
11 111 9 a

13 a

11 a
May..

104 a 103 8a 87 131 a 14 11f a 12
10

8
13

11
July......
9 91 7 a

13} a

101 a 101
August....
81 a 9 61 a 7

11 a
COMPARATIVE PRICES OF CORN IN SACKS, AT NEW ORLEANS, ON THE IST OF EACH MONTH,

FOR FIVE YEARS.
1815-16. 1844-45. 1843-44. 1842-43. 1841-42.
Months.

Cents.
Cents.
Cents.
Cents.

Cents.
September....... 40 a 42 43 a 44 42 a 43 33 a 34 60 a 63
October ......

35 a 38 40 a ... 37 a 40 32 a 33 62 a 70
November,

45 a 50 43 a 45 34 a 35 30 a 31 52 a 55 December....

80 a 82 34 a 37 43 a 45 45 a 47 50 a 55 January

55 a 63 37 a 38 36 a 38 34 a 35 50 a 53 February...

40 a 50

38 a 40 3.2 a 33 26 a 28 38 a 44 March......

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June ....

94 a

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a

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14 a

1

47 a 52

40 a 41 35 a 35 28 a 30 40 a 42 April.......... 42 a 50 35 a 36 40 a 42 35 a 36 36 a 37 May..

40 a 50 35 a 38 40 a 41 35 a 40 30 a 33 June

35 a 40 28 a 32 33 a 35 34 a 35 30 a 31 July...... 25 a 32 30 a 34 40 a 43

32 a 33 August ......

30 a 35 34 a 36 40 a 45 40 a 42 33 a 36

42 a...

IMPORT OF CURED PROVISIONS INTO THE UNITED KINGDOM. It will be seen, by the following abstract of a return ordered by the British House of Commons, that more than half of the whole imported cured provisions into the United Kingdom of Great Britain, &c., was received from the United States. This official return shows that there were imported into the United Kingdom, from the 5th of January to the 5th of July, 1846, from all quarters, 93,322 cwts. of salted beef; 27,135 of salted pork ; 1,326 of bacon ; 5,447 of hams of all kinds. These articles having been admitted free of duty since the 18th of March, 1845, no account of the quantity retained for home consumption, or taken for ship stores, can be given subsequently to that date. The quantity retained for home consumption before the 18th of March is quite inconsiderable. There were taken for sea stores, during that period, 19,140 cwts. of salted beef, 5,9577

of salted pork, and 596 of hams of all kinds. The quantities re-exported during the half-year are 705 cwts. of salted beef, 1,726 of salted pork, and 611 of hams of all kinds. More than the half of the whole imported cured provisions came from the United States :88,585 cwts. of salted beef, 15,454 of salted pork, 1,272 of bacon, and 1,130 of hans of all kinds. The nearest to America, in point of quantity, are the Hanseatic towns; which amounted to 2,711 cwts. The bulk of the re-exports were for Africa and the British colonies.

BALTIMORE FLOUR INSPECTIONS. The Baltimore Commercial Journal, (edited with care and industry by William G. Lyford, Esq.,) of Feb. 13, 1841, contains the inspection of wheat four in the city of Baltimore, for each quarter of the year, commencing March, 1798, and ending with De. cember, 1810. That table was transferred to the pages of the Merchants' Magazine, for June, 1841, (Vol. IV., No. 6, p. 569,) and now, for the purpose of continuing the table, we resume it, (being indebted to the same authentic source,) with September, 1840, the period at which the miller’s year begins, and close it with the end of June, 1845, as follows:

Barrels. Half-Barrels, Quarter ending with September, 1840,.

136,628

8,075 December,

198,530

9,907 March, 1841,..

166,264

6,474 June,

123,420

7,816 Total,........

624,842 32,272 September,

144,115 8,810 December,

179,217 8,586 March, 1842,

111,441

4,412 June,

99,965 4,475

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Total,................

469,741 27,577 September,

114,387

7,818 December,

233,726 6,428 March, 1846,

224,419

6,998 June,

180,320

6,067 Total................ 756,882 27,311 The quantity of flour inspected during the year ending with June last, exceeds in amount any previous year, since 1798; the next largest being that which ended with June, 1810, which was 731,979 barrels, and 24,196 half-barrels.

PROGRESS OF THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL MARINE

DURING THE LAST FORTY-FIVE YEARS.

A return has been presented to the British House of Commons, containing a retrospect of the progress of the British commercial marine since 1820. “ It may,” says the London Economist, " be called a succinct history of the fate of the British mercantile navy from the time when Huskisson commenced, till the time when Peel and Russell almost completed, the transition from a restrictive to a free commercial policy.” In 1821, there entered inwards from the colonies, 2,532 British vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 656,213 tons; there cleared outwards to the colonies, 2,698 British vessels, with an ag. gregate tonnage of 663,145 tons. In 1845, there entered inwards from colonial ports, 5,685 British vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 1,895,529 tons; there cleared outwards for colonial ports, 5,046 British vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 1,706,835 tons. In the year 1821, there entered inwards, from foreign ports, 6,669 British vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 863,691 tons; there cleared outwards for foreign ports, 5,766 British vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 757,295 tons. In 1845, there enter. ed inwards from foreign ports, 13,817 British vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 2,289,744 tons ; there cleared outwards for foreign ports, 14,008 British vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 2,427,552 tons. The result is, that the comparative movements of British registered shipping making the voyage in 1821 and 1845, is as follows:

ENTERED.

CLEARED.
Ships. Tonnage.

Ships. Tonnage.
1821........
9,201 1,520,104

8,464 1,420,440 1845.......

19,502 4,185,273 19,054 4,134,387

Increase.............
10,301 2,665,169

10,590 2,713,947 Making allowance for slight oscillations from year to year, the increase has been uniform and steady throughout the period; if anything, it has been in an accelerated ratio since 1840-41.

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LOUISIANA DRY DOCK, AT NEW ORLEANS. This dock was built under the superintendence, and upon the plan of John S. Gilbert's Patent Balance Dock. It is capable of taking up ships of 1,200 tons, and drawing 16 feet water, and all steamboats not exceeding 275 feet in length. The following are the rates of dockage charged on ships and steamboats, at the “ Louisiana Dry Dock :"RATES FOR DOCKING SHIPS, AND DAILY USE OF RATES FOR DOCKING STEAMBOATS, AND DAILY THE DOCK.

USE OF DOCK.
Rates for Rates

Rates for Rates
Tons.
docking. per day.

Tons.

docking.

p. day: Vessels under 100,.....

St'mboats und. 100,....

$95 100 and under 125,80 16 100 and under 125,.

100 125 150, 85 18 125 150,

106 18 150 175, 90 20 150

175,....

113 20 175 200, 95 22 175

200,

120

22 200 225, 100 21 200

225,

128

24 225 250,.. 104 26 225

250,

136

26 250 108 28 250

275,.....

145

28 275 300, 112 30 275

300,

155 300 325, 115 32 390

325,

165 325 350,

120

31
325
350,

'176 34 350 375, 126 36 350

375,... 187 36 375 400, 133

375
400,

198 38 400 425, 140 40 400

425,..... 210 40 425 450, 148 42 425

450,....

222

42 450 475,..... 156 44 450

475,.... 234 44 475 500, 164 46 475

500,

246 46 500 525, 173 48 500

525,

258 48 550, 182 50 525

550,

270 50 550 575, 191 52 550

575,...... 285 52 575 600, 200 54 575

600,..

300 54

Every additional 25 tons will pay $15, Every additional 25 tons will pay $10, and $2 50 per day, and all boats over 210 and $2 per day.

feet long will pay $3 for every additional foot.

275....

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RAILROAD, CANAL, AND STEAMBOAT STATISTICS.

RAILROAD AND STEAMBOAT ROUTE

66

From

33

FROM NEW YORK TO BOSTON, VIA LONG ISLAND. Long Island Railroad........

96 miles. Steamboat, (from Greenport to Allyn's Point,).

32 Norwich and Worcester Railroad,.

66
Boston and Worcester
Passengers leave New York by the South Ferry, for Brooklyn.
Stopping places.

Miles.
From

Fare from

New York. Boston. New York. New York, ......

0

238 Brooklyn,

1

237 East New York,......

5
6

232 $0 121 Union Course,

2

8
230

0 183 Jamaica,...

4
12
226

0 25 Brushville,..

3
15
223

0314 Hempstead Branch,..

19
219

0 371 Hicksville,..

27
211

044 Farmingdale,

32
206

0 621 Deerpark,

200

0 69 Suffolk Station,...

7
45
193

1 00 Medford Station......

11
56
182

1 187 St. George's Manor,

12
68
170

1 62 Riverhead,

7
75
163

1 621 Mattetuck,

10
85
153

1 621 Southold,

7
92
146

1 62 Greenport,

4
96
142

2 00 New London,

24
120

118 Allyn's Point,

8 128

110 Norwich,

7
135

103 Worcester,...

59 194

44 Boston,

238

0

4 00 Cars leave the depot in Brooklyn, daily, Sundays excepted, for Boston, via Norwich and Worcester, at 7 A, M. Returning, cars leave Boston at 81 A. M., by the same route. Time through, 103 hours.

Stages are in readness, on the arrival of trains at the several stations, to take passengers, at low fares, to all parts of Long Island. A steamboat, also, leaves Greenport for Sag Harbor, on the arrival of the cars.

The foregoing tabular statement of the Long Island Railroad route, between New York and Boston, is from the fourth edition, published the present year, of Disturnell's valuable Guide Book, giving the particulars of all the important lines of travel through the Middle, Northern, and Eastern States. It is patronized by most of the railroad and steamboat companies in those regions of country, and may be relied upon for its general accuracy. It should be in the possession of every traveller, as he will find information that will well repay him for the trifling cost of the work.

STATISTICS OF ALL THE CANALS OF NEW YORK. We are indebted to the polite attention of A. C. FLAGG, Esq., the Comptroller of the State of New York, for a copy of his valuable reports made to the convention for revising the constitution of the State, in obedience to a resolution of that body, of June 18th, 1846. The answer to one of the requirements of the resolution, which we publish below, shows the revenues of all the canals taken as one system, the expenses of all of them,

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