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A RAILWAY SMOKING SALOON. We cannot recommend smoking, although we are sometimes guilty of the practice. But the moral editor of the “ American Railroad Journal” assures us that the smoking portion of the community is certainly not the least respectable portion—that it is quite too large to be neglected in providing for the comfort and convenience of the public. Notwithstanding all the “counterblasts” from King James down to Mr. Lane, the practice holds its sway over men, and the Journal thinks it ever will as long as tobacco grows. “ There is no use then in denying accommodations to smokers, on the ground of objection to the habit by many; and too many great and good men have smoked and do smoke, to allow of any one stigmatising the practice as vulgar or indecent.”

In the United States we believe there is no regular arrangement for this purpose ; but it will be seen from the following paragraph from an English paper, that it has been introduced into that country, and ample arrangements made to accommodate the “smoking public" who travel :

“A novelty has recently been introduced on the Eastern Counties Railway in the running of a handsome carriage termed a smoking or excursion saloon. In size and form of build it much resembles the royal carriages on the Great Western, South Western, and other railways. Its extreme length is 40 feet, the body about 30 feet, the ends being con. verted into a kind of open lounge. It runs on six wheels, which are fitted with Adams' patent bow springs. The internal decorations are of the most recherche description. The seats extend the full length of the sides, and are handsomely covered with morocco leather. A highly polished mahogany table occupies the centre, the entire fitted with selfbalancing lamps. The sides are lighted by eight plate-glass windows of unusual size, while the ends are fitted up with four plates of looking-glass. Its drapery is composed of bright crimson silk formed in very graceful design. The roof presents an exceedingly chaste appearance. The groundwork is painted white, the mouldings being gilt

. The general furniture is of richly carved polished mahogany. The exterior is painted a deep marone color, ornamented with gold etchings and emblazoned with the company's ciphers. Passengers using this smoking saloon are to pay first-class fare."

GEORGIA RAILROAD AND BANKING COMPANY. We compile from the annual report of this corporation, the following tabular statement of its affairs, for the year commencing April 1st, 1845, and ending April 1st, 1846. It will be seen that the statements embrace the expenses incurred for making the railroad, distance between Augusta and Atlanta, from station to station, the business of each station, and of the entire road. The expenses for conducting transportation amounted to.......

$31,353 53
" motive power .........
“ maintenance of way,.........

53,592 56
" maintenance of cars,..

14,851 19

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36,406 46

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06

Total expenses,.....

$136,203 74 DISTANCES ON THE GEORGIA RAILROAD, BETWEEN AUGUSTA AND ATLANTA, FROM STATION TO

STATION, IN MILES AND THE NEAREST DECIMAL. Augusta to Belair........

10.1

Augusta to Social Circle........
Berzelia..

20.8

Covington.....
Dearing.

28.9

Conyer's..
Thomson.

37.5

Lithonia.....
Camak..

46.9

Stone Mountain..
Cumming....

56.8

Decatur.......
Crawfordville...

64.3

Atlanta........
Union Point...... 76.0 Camak to Warrenton....
Greensboro'.
83.1 Union Point to Woodville.....

119.3 129.9 140.3 146.7 155.2 164.6 170.7

3.7

66

4.7 Buckhead.... 95.5

Maxey's........ Madison. 103.3

Lexington... Rutledge. 112.1

Athens...

38.4

12.3 22.1

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The following table exhibits :-1. The numbers and names of engines; 2. Weight of
each engine, in tons and decimals; 3. Commencement of service; 4. Number of miles
run by each engine from April 1, 1845, to April 1, 1846; 5. Total number of miles run
by each engine from beginning of service to April 1, 1846; 6. Cost of repairs to each
engine, from April 1, 1845, to April 1, 1846 ; 7. Total cost of repairs and improvements
to each engine from beginning of service to April 1, 1846.
1.

2.
3.

4. 5. 6. 7.
1 Pennsylvania..... 11.40 May 5, 1837 24,336 188,731 $571 10 $5,404 42
2 Georgia. 11.59 May 5, 1837 27,127 121,197 1,315 91

6,706 85 3 Florida 11.40 Dec'r 27, 1837

60,581

3,526 74 4 Alabama. 11.40 Jan'y 12, 1838 10,824 152,054 701 19 5,937 21 5 Louisiana 11.30 Feb'y 2, 1838 33,585 163,275 626 58 6,828 28 6 Tennessee. 15.40 May 29, 1838 5,147 81,471 1,407 89 5,038 35 7 Wm. Dearing... 13.00 Nov'r 6, 1838 16,925 109,190 538 38 4,915 10 8 Virginia ....... 12.96 Dec'r 24, 1838 6,021 77,928 490 61 5,260 25 9 Mississippi....... 13.00 Dec'r 28, 1838 17,618 78,025 488 99 4,131 76 10 Kentucky......... 13.00 Mar. 24, 1839 18,602 90,843 610 41 4,879 63 11 Wm. Cumming. 12.35 Dec'r 14, 1839 4,884 17,459 45 60 1,740 68 12 James Kamak... 12.35 Dec'r 23, 1839 5,073 46,038 226 50 2,888 11 13 Athenian...., 11.08 Jan'y 3, 1845 15,635 19,745 697 14 718 14 14 Cherokee..... 15.40 April 28, 1845 11,118 11,118 306 86 306 86 15 South Carolina.. 15.68 Nov'r 1, 1845 7,718 7,718 67 26 67 26 16 North Carolina.. 15.43 Nov'r 4, 1845 7,558 7,558 52 55 52 55 17 Eagle ........... 13.00 Dec'r 5, 1845 13,680 13,680 368 10 368 10 STATEMENT OF THE BUSINESS OF EACH STATION ON THE GEORGIA RAILROAD, FOR THE YEAR

ENDING MARCH 31, 1846.

Passengers up and down.

Freight up.

Freight down. Oothcaloga..

$4,640 96 $194 08 Kingston..

5,329 07 3,131 28 Cartersville.

5,719 70 3,890. 17 Ackworth...

483 21

327 97 Marietta

7,914 54 2,214 05 Atlanta...

$37,325 54 26,022 80 5,658 08 Decatur

469 00

1,305 82 792 69 Stone Mountain.

423 50

651 08 428 71 70 00

353 66 410 50 Conyer's.....

70 00

367 77 394 00 Covington...

9,509 50 15,918 91 8,634 10 Social Circle..

1,416 00 2,170 59 2,207 56 Madison

3,666 78 7,525 69 13,398 36 Buckhead..

122 50

164 07 1,096 51 Greensboro'............................

2,401 88 3,039 55 5,316 26 Athens....

Lithonia .....

3 6

9,274 11 23,545 57 5,812 40 Lexington...

760 00

1,882 87 3,689 93 Maxey's.

227 25

962 78 2,482 31 Woodville

232 00

1,229 53 1,381 39 Union.....

2,163 26

350 08 809 07 Murden's....

7 00 Crawfordville ..

1,307 71

1,207 36 2,554 45 Cumming.....

2,052 25 1,048 75 3,211 70 Warrenton

3,274 44

1,886 10 3,231 82 Camak.....

492 90

285 14 1,059 47 Thomson...

796 00

640 66 877 40 Dearing.......

186 75

112 71 123 65

31 81 Berzelia.

258 50

125 61

500 11 Pepper Hill...

75 32 Belair.....

159 50

53 51 Lawrence's..........

1,474 05

30 75 Way passengers and freight....... 15,860 73

4,858 34

Ben Verdery's........

$92,664 98

8114,938 09

$80,160 47

Pas'grs.

STATEMENT OF THE AGGREGATE AMOUNT OF BUSINESS DONE ON THE GEORGIA RAILROAD,

FROM APRIL 1, 1845, TO APRIL 1, 1846.
Months.

Up and
Amount. Freight up. down Amount. Mail.

Total.
April...... 1,633$ $6,135 27 $9,855 18 $20,221 78 $2,968 49 $29,325 54
May....... 1,582) 5,916 68 5,022 67 8,487 29 2,968 49 17,372 46
June... 1,466 5,013 89 3,344 11 5,141 05 2,968 49
July.....

13,123 43 1,709 5,734 97 3,225 25 4,891 28 2,968 49 13,594 74 August ... 1,5585 5,178 67 3,582 91 4,629 10 2,968 49

12,776 26 Septemb’r 2,091) 6,809 76 8,932 02 10,526 40 2,968 49 October.. 2,3943

20,304 65 9,610 18 14,101 11 19,781 34 3,310 15 Novemb'r 1,970

32,701 67 8,250 40 10,598 86 19,469 83 December 2,539

3,310 15 31,030 39 9,631 76 8,295 21 20,920 01 3,310 15 33,861 92 January.. 2,343 9,682 73 7,128 99 17,045 00 3,310 15 30,037 89 February. 2,102) 8,945 81 24,568 12 31,892 57 3,310 15 44,148 53 March..... 2,596; 10,549 03 16,283 65 27,234 57 3,310 15 41,093 76 Totals. 23,9864 $91,459 15 $114,938 09 $190,240 22 $37,671 87 $319,371 24 Total amount as per above table......

$319,371 24

739 45 Extra baggage, &c.........

337 33 Season tickets....

237 00 Lots negroes.......

870 50 Freight between stations...

4,858 34 Rents......

417 65

Extra trips..

Deduct for Western and Atlantic railroad proportion .......

326,831 51
11,489 92

$315,341 59

HARTFORD AND NEW HAVEN RAILROAD. The railroad between Hartford and New Haven is thirty-six miles in length, and forms a link in one of the many railroad and steamboat routes between New York and Boston, which, however, is not very generally adopted by travellers, as the other routes are more direct and rapid. By this route passengers leave New York every morning, by steamboat for New Haven, a distance of 78 miles; at New Haven they take the New Haven and Hartford Railroad, 36 miles, for the latter place, which connects with the Hartford and Springfield road to the latter place, 26 miles further. From Springfield, the Western Railroad conveys them to Boston, a distance of 96 miles. Total by this route between New York and Boston, 238 miles,

The report of the directors of the Hartford and New Haven Railroad Company, recently made to stockholders, at their annual meeting, exhibits the affairs of that company in a highly favorable light. It appears that the receipts of the road from Sept. 1, 1845, to Sept. 1, 1846, have been as follows:From passengers,..

$155,061 01 Freight,..... Mail and expresses,.

12,300 00 Total............

$228,611 74 Expenses of operating and maintaining the road, and interests on bonds and loans,......

123,483 24 Nett income for the year,...

$105,128 50 Equal to 75 per cent on the amount of stock issued.

The receipts the previous year, from Sept. 1, 1844, to Sept. 1, 1845, were $176,984 40. The extension road was opened for business on the 9th of December, 1844, and the

61,250 73

directors made the income of the last nine months of the year the basis for an estimate of the income of the current year, and the amount was fixed at $210,000. The receipts, as will be seen above, have exceeded the estimate, $18,611 74.

The number of passengers transported between Hartford and Springfield, exclusive of way and through travel, has been, during the past year, 45,945. Between Springfield and New Haven, exclusive of way and through travel, 16,084. Whole number of passengers transported between all the stations, 196,278; of this large number, not one received the slightest injury while on the road.

Cost.

STEAMBOATS BUILT IN THE WEST, IN 1846.
We find the following statistics in the Cincinnati Advertiser, giving the number of
Steamboats built at the places named:-

Boats. Tonnage.
New Albany........

11 1,959 $118,500
Louisville,......

16 4,152 270,000 St. Louis,

10 2,912 180,500 Cincinnati,

29 7,209 505,500 Pittsburgh,..

42 5,428 325,500

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51,660 $1,400,000 The Advertiser says, there are at this time no less than 750 steamboats on these rivers, whose tonnage will not fall short of 160,000 tons, and which have cost, in their construction and equipment, $12,000,000. What a magnificent picture of Western progress is presented in these facts. Our steamboat commerce is only thirty years old, and a single large boat out of these 750 vessels, could take the whole annual produce to New Orleans, which, forty years ago, floated from the West to that port.

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BROOKLYN STEAMBOAT FERRIES. The distance from the city of New York to the city of Brooklyn, from the different ferries, is as follows :-South Ferry, 1,300 yards, or 20 yards less than three-quarters of a mile ; Fulton Ferry, 731 yards ; Catharine-street Ferry, 736 yards, and Jackson-street Ferry, 707 yards. In 1654, the charge for ferringe of a foot passenger was three sluyvers; in 1693, eight stuyvers in wampum, or two pence in silver; in 1752, ten grains of Sevil silver or Mexican plate, or two pence in bills of credit. During the revolutionary war, it was raised to six pence, but it was afterward reduced to two pence. It remained at this rate till the introduction of steamboats, when, by an act of the Legislature, the company was authorized to charge four cents on those boats, while it remained as before on other craft. This law remains unaltered, though the present company, some years ago, voluntarily reduced it to three cents, and since February, 1844, they have charged only two cents. The first steamboat-the “Nassau"-was placed on the Fulton ferry in 1814. There are now nine or ten steamboats that are kept in constant use on these ferries during the day, and the Fulton company keep one running the whole night.

1

Miles. 265

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EXTENSION OF THE MAGNETIC TELEGRAPH.
From New York to New Haven, Hartford, Springfield, and Boston,..........
From New York to Albany, Utica, Auburn, Syracuse, Rochester, Lockport and

Buffalo,....,
From New York to Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington,
From Philadelphia to Harrisburg, ..
From Boston to Lowell,...
From Boston to Portland, (110 miles half finished,).
From Ithaca 10 Auburn....
From Troy to Saratoga,.
VOL. XV.-NO. V,

33

507 240 105 26 55 40 31

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JOURNAL OF MINING AND MANUFACTURES.

NINETEENTH EXHIBITION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE,
HELD AT CASTLE GARDEN, IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK.

The Nineteenth Exhibition of the American Institute, which occurred in the city of New York, was attended with all those circumstances that were calculated to make such an event interesting and important. The Fair, which constituted a prominent part of this exhibition, was held in Castle Garden, at the foot of the Battery; a structure which, from its magnitude—furnishing, as it does, an ample theatre, that is believed to be the largest upon the continent—was peculiarly adapted to the display of the various articles that were collected for the occasion. This fortress was appropriately decorated for the purpose, and the accumulation within its walls of the innumerable products of agriculture, manufactures, and the useful arts, together with the interest excited by the vast concourse of spectators who daily thronged its area, gave to the occasion a more than ordinary interest. The articles of the fair consisted of all kinds of fabrics of art, machines, models, and inventions connected with the several branches of domestic industry, and, as belonging to the general design, there was also an exhibition of the most approved specimens of stock that are employed in husbandry, and a display of horticultural and floral products. During the same time, there was held in the same city, a national convention of farmers, gardeners, and silk culturists. An address by the Honorable Mahlon Dickerson, the president of the Institute, was also delivered as introductory to the occasion, and the whole exhibition received that public interest which is due to the importance of the subject.

It can hardly be doubted that the objects of the American Institute are of great public utility. They tend to array in one grand display, the various products and inventions of the useful arts; to assemble in the principal commercial city of the Union those individuals who are interested in the same general cause, for mutual consultation; to exhibit the actual progress of the nation in the useful arts; to show what inventions have been made, as well as what improvements have been perfected in former inventions; to grant to the deserving and ingenious, the testimonials of merit which their industry would seem to evoke; and, finally, to collect upon one broad platform, that particular portion of the community who are interested in the progress of the country in those respects, for common counsel and deliberation. The society has been in existence for the last nineteen years, and it has been, thus far, successful in the objects for which it was originally founded. Rewards of merit have been granted to the originators of the most approved inventions, consisting of gold and silver medals, silver cups, diplomas, money and books; and those testimonials have, doubtless, tended to encourage a salutary spirit of emulous industry.

If we were to specify any articles which were conspicuous in the exhibition, we might allude to the elegant specimens of cabinet furniture, embroidery with the needle, of great beauty, various pieces of carpeting, of bright color and fine texture, woollen and cotton cloths, hardware, fire-engines, iron and brass work, and various other products connected with the arts and trades. The whole scene was enlivened by a fountain which played in the midst, and by the tone of the piano, and the music of the band, that were heard above the whispers of the crowd. The Gothic arches of a portion of the hall were entwined with evergreens, and machinery of various sorts was made to run by the agency of water that was ingeniously conducted into the place of exhibition. Amid so large a mass of products here collected, it would be difficult, of course, on a casual inspection, to determine the actual excellence of their various kinds, or the value of the several subjects of invention here arrayed; but the whole display was calculated to impress the spectator

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