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EPIGRAMS

On the IMMACULATE BOY

That Master Pitt seems

To be fond of extremes,
No longer is thought any riddle ;

For sure we may say,

'Tis as plain as the day, That he always kept clear of the middle.

ANOTHER.
'Tis true, indeed, we oft abuse him,

Because he bends to no man ;
But Slander's self dares not accuse him

Of stiffness to a woman.

ANOTHER “ No! no! for my virginity, “ When I lose that,” quoth Pitt, “ I'll die;" Cries Wilbertorce, “ If not till then, “ By G-d you must outlive all men *."

*« No! no! for my virginity,

“ When I lose that,” quoth Rose, “ I'll die ;"
“ Behind the elms last night,” quoth Dick,
“ Rose, were you not extremely sick ?"

PRIOR.

ANOTHER *.

On fair and equal terms to place

An union is thy care;
But trust me, Powis, in this case
The equal should not please his Grace,

And Pitt dislikes the fair.

ANOTHER.

The virulent fair,

Protest and declare,
This Ministry's not to their hearts;

For say what they will,

To them Master Bill
Has never discover'd his parts.

ANOTHER.

- Ex nihilo nil fet.

When Pitt exclaim'd, “ By measures I'll be tried," That false appeal all woman-kind denied.

ANOTHER.

Incautious Fox will oft repose

In fair one's bosom thoughts of worth ;
But Pitt his secrets keeps so close,

No female arts can draw them forth.

* A coalition between the Duke of PORTLAND and Mr. Pitt, was attempted to be formed by Mr. Powis, and the other Country Gentlemen-This endeavour, however, was defeated in consequence of Mr. Pitt's construction of the terms fair and equal,

ANOTHER.
Had Pitt to his advice inclined,

Sir Cecil had undone us;
But he, a friend to womankind,
Would nothing lay upon us.

ANCILLA.

.: ANOTHER. .. so Pill On Mr. PITT's Prudence. . . Though Pitt have to women told some things, no doubt ; Yet his private affairs they have never found out.

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.. . ANOTHER.
L'empoi.. Puer loquitur.
· Though big with mathematic pride,

By me this axiom is denied ;
I can't conceive, upon my soul,
My parts are equal to the whole.

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THE

DELAVALIAD.

Why, says an indignant poet, should Mr. Rolle alone, of all the geniuses that distinguish the present period, be thought the only person of worth or talents enough to give birth and name to an immortal effusion of divine poesy? He questions not that great man's pretensions ; far from it; he reveres his ancestors, adores his talents, and feels something hardly short of idolatry towards his manners and accomplishments. But still, why such profusion of distinction towards one, to the exclusion of many other high characters ? Our Poet professes to feel this injustice extremely, and has made the following attempt to rescue one deserving man from so unmerited an obloquy. The reader will perceive the measure to be an imitation of that which has been so deservedly admired in our immortal bard, in his play of “ As You Like It.

From the East to the Western Inde
No Jewel is like Rosalind;
Her worth being mounted on the wind,
Thro' all the world bears Rosalind, &c. &c.

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This kind of verse is adopted by the poet to avoid any appearance of too servile an imitation of the ROLLIAD. He begins,

Ye patriots all, both great and small,
Resign the palm to DELAVAL;
The virtues would'st thou practise all,
So in a month did DeLaval.
A patriot first both stout and tall,
Firm for the day was DELAVAL.
The friend to court, where frowns appal,
The next became 'good DELAVAL.
Wilt thou against oppression bawl ?
Just so did valiant Delaval!
Yet in a month, thyself enthral,
So did the yielding DeLaval:
Yet give to both, a dangerous fall,
So did reflecting Delaval.
If resignation's good in all,
Why so it is in DeLaval:
For if you against a wall,
Just so you may 'gainst DeLaval:
And if with foot you kick a ball,
E'en so you may-A DELAVAL.
'Gainst influence would'st thou vent thy gall,
Thus did the patriot DELAVAL:
Yet servile stoop to Royal call,
So did the loyal Delaval.
What friend to Freedom's fair-built Hall,
Was louder heard than DeLavAL?
Yet who the Commons rights to maul,
More stout was found than DELAVAL?
-'Gainst Lords and Lordlings would'st thou brawl,
Just so did he-SiR DELAVAL:

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