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INCANTATION,

- sudi ili torni 1. benga FOB RAISING A PHANTOM, IMITATED FROM MACBBTK,

AND LATELY PERFORMED BY HIS MAJESTY'S SERVANTS

IN WESTMINSTER.

Thunder.

A Cauldron boiling,

Enter three Witches.

First Witch.
Thrice the Doctors have been heard,
Second Witch. Thrice the Houses have conferred.
Third Witch. Thrice hath Sydney cock'd his chin,

Jenky cries-begin, begin.
First Witch. Round about the cauldron go,

In the fell ingredients throw.
Still-born Fætus, born and bred,
In a Lawyer's puzzled head,
Hatch'd by Metaphysic Scot,

Boil thou in the enchanted pot.
All. Double, double, toil and trouble ;

Fire burn, and Cauldron bubble.
Second Witch. Skull that holds the small remains .

Of old Camden's addle brains ;
Liver of the lily's hue,
Which in RICHMOND's carcase grew;
Tears which stealing down the cheek
Of the rugged Thurlow, speak
All the poignant grief he feels
For his Sovereign-or the Seals ;

All.

For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a Hell-broth, boil and bubble.
Double, double, toil and trouble,

Fire burn, and Cauldron bubble. Third Witeb. Clippings of Corinthian brass oir av : From the visage of DUNDAS; ,, ,

Forg'd Address, devis'd by Rose,
Half of Pepper Arden's nose ;
Şmuggled vote of City Thanks,
Promise of insidious Banks;
Add a grain of Rollo's courage,

To enflame the hellish porridge.
First Witch.. Cool it, with LLOYD Kenyon's blood.

Now the charm is firm and good.
Double, double, toil and trouble,
Fire burn, and Cauldron bubble.

All.

Enter Hecate, Queen of the Witches.

On:

Hecate.

Oh! well done! I commend your pains,

And ev'ry one shall share i'th' gains, Cauldron sinks. Witches fly away upon broomsticks;

thunder, &c.

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TRANSLATIONS.

OF LORD BELGRAVE'S MEMORABLE QUOTATION, ÅS
INTRODUCED IN A SPEECH DELEIVRED BY

HIS LORDSHIP IN A LATE DEBATE.

It is with singular satisfaction we communicate the following

most excellent versions of Lord Belgrave's never-to-be-forgotten quotation ; trusting, as we sincerely do, that so mark'd an attention to bis Lordship's scholarship may considerably console him under his melancholy failure as an orator.

Lord Belgrave's Quotation.

Τον δαπαμειβομενος προσαφη σοδες ομως Αχιλλεύς.

Translation by Lord Grosvenor. His dam was Thetis, Æacus his Sire, ... And for his paces he was nam'd Highflyer.

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Another by Sir Joseph Mawbey. Achilles, who was quite a man of whim, And also had a swift foot, answer'd him

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Another by Sir Cecil Wray.
There was a man, Achilles he was callid,
He had two feet, they were so swift, he ball’d,
Or otherwise, he mought, I say, have fall’d.

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Another by Lord Mornington, and Lord Grabam.
With lightest heels oppos'd to heaviest head,
To Lord Atrides, Lord Achilles said.

Another by the Cbancellor. To him Achilles, with a furious nod, Replied, a very pretty speech, by G-d!

Another by Mr. Grenville. The Grecian speaker rose with look so big, It spoke his bottom and nigh burst his wig

. Another by Brook Wat son. : Up stood Achilles on his nimble pegs, And said, “ May I pree-seume to shew my legs ?"

Another by Mr. Wilberforce.
Achilles came forward to snivel and rant ;
His spirit was spleen and his piety cant. ..."

. Another by Mr. Pitt. . Frantic with rage, uprose the fierce Achilles : How comfortably calm !” said Nestor Willis

Translation by Sir John Scott. With metaphysic art his speech he plann'd, And said what nobody could understand.

Another by Mr. Bastard..

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The Trojan I oppose, he said, 'tis true, ';
But I abuse and hate Atrides too.", i nf

Another by Lord Fawconberg.
Enrag'd Achilles never would agree,
A“ petty vote," a " menial slave," was he.

.

Another by Mons. Alderman Le Mesurier. By gar, Achille he say, I make a you . ..? Parler anoder launguage, ventre bleu!, 40,

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Another by Lord Westcote. Pliant and prompt in crane-neck curves to whed,' . Achilles rose, and turn'd upon his heel.

Another by Mr. Wilbraham Boorle.
In oily terms he urg'd the chiefs to peace,
For none was more a friend than he to Grease, .

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Another by Lord Bayhan.
His conscious hat well lin'd with borrow'd prose,
The lubber chief in sulky mien arose ;
Elate with pride his long pent silence broke,
And could he but have read, he might have spoke.

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Another by Mr. Dundas.
Up the bra' chield arose, and weel I wis
To beath sides booing, begg'd 'em to dismiss
Their wordy warsare in “ a general peece,”*

* It is impossible for the reader to comprehend the full force of this expression, unless he recollects the wonderful effects it produced in the House of Communs from Mr. Dundas's peculiar dialect, upon that memorable oc. casion, when that great diuretic orator, expatiating on Oriental tranquillity, assured the House, that " at that moment all India was at peece-Bengal was at peace-Tippo sultan was at peece The Mabrattas were at pecce

Every creature in Indostan, he knew it for a fawet, was comfortably at

peece!!!

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