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TENNESSEE:

Aye.
H. C. Young.

Nays.
William McFarland,
J. M. Thomburg,
George C. Dibrell,
John M. Bright,
John F. House,
W. C. Whitthorne,
John D. C. Atkins,
William P. Caldwell.

TEXAS :

Ayes.
John II. Reagan,
J. W. Throckmorton,
John Hancock,
Gustave Schleicher,

Nays.
David B. Culberson,
Roger O. Mills.

VERMONT :

Aye.
Dubley C. Denison.

Nays.
Charles H. Joyce,
George W. Hendee,

VIRGINIA :

Aye.
William H. H. Stowell,

Nays.
Beverly B. Douglas,
John Goode, Jr.,
Gilbert C. Walker,
George C. Cabell,
John R. Tucker,
John T. Harris,
Eppa Hunton,
William Terry.
WEST VIRGINIA :

Ways
Benjamin Wilson,
Charles J. Faulkner,
Frank Ilereford.

WISCONSIN :

Ayes.
Charles G. Williams,
Lucien B. Caswell,
Henry S. Magoon.

Nays.
William Pitt Lynde,
Samuel D. Burchard,
Alanson M. Kimball,
Jeremiah M. Rush,
George W. Cate.

R. A. DeBolt,
John B. Clark, Jr.,
John M. Glover,
Aylett H. Buckner.

NEBRASKA:

Aye. Lorenzo Crounse,

NEVADA:

Aye. William Woodburn, NEW IIAMPSHIRE :

Aye. Henry W. Blair.

Nays. Frank Jones, Samuel N. Bell.

NEW JERSEY :

Ayes.
Clement II. Sinnickson,
Samuel A. Dobbins,
Miles Ross,
Augustus W. Cutler,
Frederick H. Teese,
A. A. Hardenbergh.

Not loting.
Robert IIamilton.

NEW YORK.

Ayes.
John G. Schumaker,
L. B. Crittenden,
Archibald M. Bliss,
Edwin R. Meade,
Elijah Ward,
Fernando Wood,
Abram S. Hewitt,
J. O. Whitehouse,
Charles H. Adams,
M. J. Townsend,
Andrew Williams,
William A. Wheeler,
Henry H. Hathorn,
Samuel F. Miller,
George A. Bagley,
William H. Baker,
E. W. Leavenworth,
C. D. MacDougall,
E. G. Lapham,
Thomas C. Platt,
John M. Davy,
Lyman K. Bass.

Nays.
Henry B. Metcalfe,
Samuel S. Cox,
Benjamin A. Willis,
George M. Beebe,
John H. Bagley, Jr.,
Scott Lord,
George G. Hoskins,

Not l'oting
Smith Ely, Jr.,
X. Holmes Odell,
C. C. B. Walker.
NORTH CAROLINA:

Ayes.
J. A. IIyman,
Alfred M. Waddell,
William M. Robbins,

Nays.
Jesse J. Yeates,
Joseph J. Davis,
Alfred M. Scales,

Thomas S. Ashe,
Robert B. Vance.

OHIO:

Ayes.
H. B. Banning,
William Lawrence,
Charles Foster,
N. II. Van Vorhes,
Lorenzo Danford,
L. D. Woodworth,
James Monroe,
James A. Garfield.

Nays.
Milton Sayler,
John S. Savage,
John A. McMahon,
Americus V. Rice,
Frank II. Hurd,
Lawrence T. Neal,
E. F. Poppleton,
John L. Vance,
Ansel T. Walling,

Milton I. Southard,
Jacob P. Cowan.

Not Voting:
Henry B. Payne.

OREGON:

Aye.
Lafayette Lane.
PENNSYLVANIA :

Aves.
Chapman Freeman,
Charles O'Neill,
Samuel J. Randall,
William D. Kelley,
John Robbins,
Washington Townsend,
Alan Wood, Jr.,
Hiester Clymer,
A. Herr Smith,
William Mutchler,
W. W. Ketchum,
Joseph Powell,
Sobieski Ross,
John Reilly,
Levi Maish,
Levi A. Mackey,
James H. Hopkins,
John W. Wallace,
George A. Jenks,
Albert G. Egbert.

Vays.
Francis D. Collins,
William S. Stenger,
Jacob Tumey,
Alexander G. Cochrane,
James Sheakley.

Not loting
James B. Reilly,
Jobn B. Packer.
RHODE ISLAND :

Ayes.
Benjamin T. Eames,
Latimer W. Ballou.
SOUTH CAROLINA:

Ayes.
Joseph H. Rainey,
E. W. M. Mackey,
Solomon L. Hoge,
Alexander S. Wallace,
Robert Smalls,

We had boped to have the final vote of the Senate to present in this number, and liave delayed the closing up of these memoranda beyond the proper time, to that end. But the Senate, with all its presumed dignity and superior code, is of late very much of a partisan political laboratory of president factory; indeed, it is apparently little better than the House so far as that lofty statesmanship is concerned which, in its attention to the best interests of the country, rises above party. The two parties in the Congress are alike so intent on gaining every possible advantage over their opponents-on making political capital and bolstening up their respective "chances" sor the coming election--that questions like that of the Centennial Exposition and the general welfare of the nation must necessarily yield to " amnesty," and like questions which afford opportunities to demagogues to spread themselves and to inveigle opponents into damaging utterances.

We cannot longer wait for the Senate's action, especially as there is no assurance to-day (February 2d) when that august body will find time to act on the question. Doubtless the bill as it passed the House, with the outrageous amend. ment of Mr. Springer, will pass the Senate. It is as well that it should, for were the Senate to amend it it would require farther action on the part of the House, and the Exposition would perhaps be quite over ere the appropriation could be available.

The Sunday Dispatch of the zoth ult., has a strong editurile on the action of the House, from which we extract a few passages :

“ Aster subscriptions and payments of over five millions of dollars to the authorized stock of the Exhibition has been secured, the Government was asked to take the remainder of the stock on the same terms as citizens. The House of Rep resentatives finally adopted the proposition, with a provin) that the one million five hundred thousand dollars shall be repaid out of the profits before the other subscribers to Cen: | building has been provided for, and that their effort should tennial stock shall receive payment. In other words, Congress be directed towards securing such other buildings as may be says that if the citizens, who have been giving of their means deemed suitable and necessary for the purpose. with great liberality and in a spirit of patriotism, will make I am yours, very respectfully, the Government a preferred creditor, it will loan the money.

A. T. GOSHORN, Director-General. Otherwise Congress will not contribute a cent toward an object authonzed by the Government, and carried on under

A Chime of Bells.-The Baltimore American says : its name and authority. If anything meaner than this can

At McShane's bell foundry, Baltimore, there is being cast

a chime of twelve bells, to be sent to the Centennial Exbe found in the annals of legislation, or in any record of the dealings of Governments with their citizens, we should like position, which will probably be completed in about four to know where the case happened. The European Govern

weeks. The bells will be erected upon a high tower, to be ments in which expositions of industry have been held have constructed especially for their accommodation by the Cenliserally aided in all particulars. It has been reserved for

tennial Commission, from whence they will peal forth the the llouse of Representatives of the United States-composed

national airs. In casting, the closest attention will be given of delegates of the people—to descend to a depth of mean

to the operations, and hence plenty of time has been assigned ness, in reference to our celebration of a great national event,

for the work. Their scale, covering a full octave and a third, of which every true American must feel heartily ashamed.”

has been arranged by Professor Widows, of the Metropolitan

Church, Washington, D. C. Important to Exhibitors.—The following communica

Paragraphs.- Mr. John Hatch, of California, has spent tion fully explains itself :

many years in making a collection of specimens of the preTREASURY DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.

cious ores of the Pacific Slope, Mexico, Central and South To the Collector of Customs, Philadelphia, Pa.:

America, Australia, China, and Japan. His collection numSir: I am in receipt of the communication dated the 3d bers between 12,000 and 15,000, and he is preparing them inst., of Mr. 1). Tory, chief of the Bureau of Transportation for exhibition at the Centennial. of the Centennial Commission, transmitted with your letier

The indications are most encouraging of an unprecedently of the 10th inst., relative to the interpretation to be placed large participation in the exhibition on the part of England, on the words, “ July authorized in section 6 of decision 2,432, Germany, France, and all other countries of note. November, 1875." The section referred to provides for the

The Press, of Philadelphia, recently published a list of the transportation of merchandise destined for the International

English exhibitors; it made one full page, and encroached Exhibition at Philadelphia by a duly authorized and bonded largely upon a second. The Press has fairly won the title route, a route authorized and bonded expressly for the purpose of the “organ of the Exhibition,” by its full and accurate of transporting goods to the Centennial Buildings, and is not chronicling of everything that transpires in connection with to be construed as authorizing the transportation of such

the preparations therefor. goods over and other than the one bonded specially for that purpose. Respectfully,

The Cliff-Houses of Colorado and Utah.—An interest. B. H. BRISTOW,

ing feature of the Centennial Exposition will be the exhibition Secretary of the Treasury.

by Dr. Hayden, of clay and plaster models of the cliff-houses

of Colorado and Utah, now being prepared by Messrs. The Kindergarten.-Not long ago Mr. Campbell, chair

Jackson & Holmes, photographers to the survey. These man of the Educational Committee of the Centennial Com

houses are still to be found in a good state of preservation mission, announced that contributions would be received for

upon the narrowest and most inaccessible shelves of the the erection of a kindergarten in the Centennial Grounds,

canon walls of those regions. They are well built, of dressed whereupon Mrs. Gillespie, president of the Women's Execu.

stone, which had been brought from a distance, and occupy live ('ommittee, addressed a letter to Mr. Goshorn, informing oftentimes almost the entire available portion of the terrace him that the kindergarten had been provided for by the

upon which they have been erected. It is supposed that women of the country. The following is Mr. Goshorn's they are the work of the Moquis, an agricultural nation, of response :

which remnants still survive, and that they were rendered dr. E. D. Gillespie, President of the Women's Centennial necessary by the incursions of hostile Northern Indians. A Erenice Committee :

short description, accompanied by several wond-cuts of these Dikar MADAM: I am in receipt of your esteemed favor curious structures, is to be found in the Naturalist for the advising us that your committee have made the necessary current month. provision for the erection of a building in the Exhibition Grounds for kindergarten purposes. The recommendation A Fire Brigade.—Mr. Atwood Smith, president of the recently made to the friends of the educational interest of the Philadelphia Fire Patrol, has been appointed to organize a country to provide means and adopt plans for the construction fire brigade for duty at the Centennial Grounds. This of illastrative school buildings is a desirable feature of the brigade will consist of 150 men, with all the necessary equipeducational representation included in a kindergarten house. ment and apparatus for effective service. I am gratified to learn that you and your officials have anticipated the suggestion. I have accordingly notified those The Witherspoon Statue is finished, and is creditable to whom the recommendation was made that the kindergarten to all who have contributed to its excellence.

66

R. A. DeBolt,
John B. Clark, Jr.,
John M. Glover,
Aylett H. Buckner.

NEBRASKA:

Aye. Lorenzo Crounse,

NEVADA:

Aye.
William Woodburn,
New IIAMPSHIRE :

Aye.
Henry W. Blair.

Nays. Frank Jones, Samuel N. Bell.

New JERSEY :

Ayes.
Clement H. Sinnickson,
Samuel A. Dobbins,
Miles Ross,
Augustus W. Cutler,
Frederick H. Teese,
A, A. Hardenbergh.

Not Foting
Robert IIamilton.

NEW YORK.

Ayes.
John G. Schumaker,
L. B. Crittenden,
Archibald M. Bliss,
Edwin R. Meade,
Elijah Warı,
Fernando Wood,
Abram S. Hewitt,
J. O. Whitehouse,
Charles H. Adams,
M. J. Townsend,
Andrew Williams,
William A. Wheeler,
Henry H. Hathorn,
Samuel F. Miller,
George A. Bagley,
William H. Baker,
E. W. Leavenworth,
C. D. MacDougall,
E. G. Lapham,
Thonias C. Platt,
John M. Davy,
Lyman K. Bass.

Nays.
Henry B. Metcalfe,
Samuel S. Cox,
Benjamin A. Willis,
George M. Beebe,
John H. Bagley, Jr.,
Scott Lord,
George G. Hoskins,

Thomas S. Ashe,
Robert B. Vance.
OHIO:

H.C
Ayes.
H. B. Banning,

Wi!
William Lawrence,

J.'
Charles Foster,

G
N. II. Van Vorhes,
Lorenzo Danford,

roce nation. Li.
L. D. Woodworth,

Bile was
James Monroe,

(

1's Word. James A. Garfield.

she nation was
Nays.

all' an educated
Milton Sayler,
John S. Savage,

Given to all the citi-
John A. McMahon,

control them aright.
Americus V. Rice,

make them God-fearing Frank II. Hurd,

nok best book to mould the
Lawrence T. Neal,

Hiive good citizens. It con-
E. F. Poppleton,

slobality, and never hides the
John L. Vance,
Insel T. Walling,

l and noble in its very simplicity.
Milton I. Southard,

mob, but it should have an honored Jacob P. Cowan.

party should have the power to put Not Voting.

i to put it out want to overturn the
Henry B. Payne.

...non schools. The Bible is too neces.
OREGON:
Aye.

is for us to allow any party or church to
Lafayette Lane.

n it. As citizens of this country we must PENNSYI.1'11

-, yelling the first step, sectarian bigots make

vantage ground from which they shall crush our
Chapman Freema

We need an open Bible in our homes, in our
Charles O'Neiil,

dos var churches.
Samuel J. Rani
William D. Ke
John Robbins,

kisw Scandal Grows and Travels.-Morrisville, Penn.
Washington 1

77, affords a first-rate illustration of how scandal can
Alan Wood,

vel and magnisy from a very small and innocent matter.
Hiester Clya
A. Herr Sin

1'e young pastor, Rev. Mr. Shields, was room-mate, it
William

seems, of the dry.goods storekeeper, and naturally was very W, W. Kre

frequently in his friend's store, sometimes helping him. A Joseph

few days ago he bought forty-six cents worth of goods, leaned Sobieski

over the counter, dropped a two dollar bill into the money-
John R

are drawer, and took out the change. Some customers saw him,
Levi M.
Levi 1

is the ! guessed he was stealing, and circulated the story in the vil.
Jame:

-Janity lage. And speedily grew the tale that the young pastor was
John

of good a veteran till-tapper, and had raided on nearly every money-
Geos

drawer in town. But the church and the pastor went straightAllie

ack upon / way to work, and traced the scandal to its starting point. F.

ile of Eu- The storekeeper and his two clerks explained the circum-
11

57 held full stances, a vote of confidence was unanimously passed, and
mountains. the little village is quiet once more.

Pork-Packing in the West.-The Price Current (Cin-
This the blight of cinnati) has revised returns from a large number of pork-
1.urteen hun- packing points. Interior points show a probable falling off

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Not Voting
Smith Ely, Jr.,
N. Holmes Odell,
C. C. B. Walker.
North CAROLINA :

Ayes.
J. A. Iyman,
Alfred M. Waddell,
William M. Robbins,

Nays.
Jesse J. Yeates,
Joseph J. Davis,
Alfred M, Scales,

wat fallen upon for the entire season amounting to 5,050,000. The six leade a measure of ing cities are now 370,000 behind the same date last year. *****: Protestant em- Cincinnati weights are about the same as last year; Chicago,

ne Word of God is about eighteen pounds heavier; Louisville, seven pounds *** has extended to heavier; and St. Louis, twenty-five pounds heavier. Interior

of the South Sea, points west of Indiana show a large increase in weight, te name of Christ. In | Hogs continue of superior quality at all points; the estimated ** common schools, packing at all points, including the six cities, indicate a pos.

sible falling off in numbers for the entire season amounting yea Bible is the only I to three-fourths or a million.

all Europe.

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-- Dr. Howe.—Mr. James T. Fields prefaced and from the Christian Union Publishing Company he one

to the students of Boston University on year received $10,000 for a life of Christ. Besides all this January, with this tribute to the late | he is in the receipt of an annual income as author's percent

now lying dead in this city, age on the sale of his works, so that his income for several day, whose life and char- years past has been in the neighborhood of $40,000 per for all of us that no

His salary this year, it will be remembered, was ising to address raised to $100,000. The Rev. Dr. John Hall has a salary y omit some

of $10,000 gold, per annum, and he also adds to his income guished. The by writing and lecturing. The Rev. Dr. Hepworth, of the sceive from elo Church of the Disciples, was in receipt of a salary of $10,000

Inspiring words per annum until recently. The Rev. Dr. Storrs, of the he suggested at the Church of the Pilgrims, Brooklyn, receives a salary of $10,000 cinnot proceed to the per annum. He was offered an advanced salary by one of the hier without pausing to New York Congregational churches some time ago, but was be the heroic youth, the induced to remain with his old charge. The Rev. Dr. Budung philanthrophy of one dington, also one of the best known of Brooklyn pastors, re

ved in imparting strength to ceives $10,000 per annum. The Rev. Dr. Morgan Dix, the ...), thought to half-extinguished i rector of Trinity, receives $15,000 per annum. He has two or light to so many who were born more assistants, who receive from $4,000 to $6,000 each.

The senior minister at St. Paul's receives $10,000, and his

assistant $4,000. The Rev. Dr. Weston, for many years : - Senator Christiancy has introduced a past the pastor of St. John's Church, receives $10,000 salary,

111 regard to jurors in Utah. It provides and has an assistant at $4,000. The pastor who officiates at for bigamy or polygamy it shall be a suffi- Trinity Chapel also receives $10,000, and has one or more : vallenge and for the rejection of any juror, assistants. The Rev. Dr. Chapin also receives $10,000 !. 19 more than one wife living in said Territory, salary. The Rev. Dr. Schenck, rector of St. Ann's, the en nied by the ordinary rites or by the so-called fashionable Episcopalian church of Brooklyn, receives s'ceremony, or second, that he believes it morally $10,00ɔ. r a man to live with more than one wise. If the panel

Toleration in Constantinople.—A Christian gentleman > exhausted, talesmen may be summoned until the reI've number of jurors shall be obtained.

lately rented a house in a quarter of Constantinople which

is partly inhabited by Turks and partly by Christians. When Toleration in New Hampshire.—Arthur P. Devlin moving thither he was insulted by the Turkish mob, led by lectured at Dover, New Hampshire, a sew weeks since, on

the Muktar and the Imaum. They broke open the doors and “Romanism in America." 'After the lecture a crowd fol.

threw the furniture into the street. Mr. M. sent to the police lowed him to his hotel; on the way he fled into a drug.store

station for assistance. Three policemen appeared, but assisted for safety, where bricks were thrown through the windows,

the mob and imprisoned the gentleman. His house was and the Mayor was compelled to read the riot act. The police plundered and his furniture destroyed. finally succeeded in getting him to the hotel, not, however, without being compelled to use their revolvers. It is well

Another Papal Diocese.—The New York Freeman's nigh time this species of toleration were checked by making Journal, announces that Alleghany City, Pa., has been made examples of some of the tolerants. If not checked, it may

a diocese, and Bishop Domenec, now of Pittsburg, named be necessary some day to secure a license from the Cardinal

its first bishop. Very Rev. J. Quigg, of Altoona is appointed before a lecturer can safely ascend the rostrum.

Bishop of Pittsburg.
The Lutherans in Russia pay big salaries to their pas-

John C. Fremont.--Instead of being

a little, weazentors, viz., two rubles for each soul, the average number of faced, dried up old man,” was stated by a New York paper souls in every parish being filteen hundred. On account of recently, General John C. Fremont is, according to the this circumstance the Russian government proposes to in. Virginia (Nevada) Enterprise, a splendid-looking man, his crease the salaries of the orthodox clergy.

face fresh and strong, though bronzed as though by contact

with years of out-door life. His hair is silvered, but in Salaries of New York Clergymen. Some of the more looking at it the impression is that it is so through exposure distinguished of New York's clergymen will not suffer the and not age, and it sets off the face finely. pangs of hunger right away if their salaries are any indication of their abundance of the comforts of this life. The Col. A. A. Mechling, a former resident of Pittsburg, died preacher who receives the highest salary in this country is at Yankton, D. T., recently. The deceased entered the army the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. For several years past bis when the rebellion broke out, and fought through the war salary has been $20,000 per annum.

In addition to this, it making for himself an excellent record, and leaving the is safe to say that he received $5,000 per annum for various service with the rank of colonel. He was fifty years of age lectures delivered by him in the winter season.

at the time of his demise. Rev. I. Mechling, of Greensburg as editor of the Christian Union was $10,000 per annum,

His salary

and W. H. Mechling, of Pittsburg, are his brothers.

CURRENT MEMORANDA.

zens.

men.

a

The “Monthly" for March. We offer this month a , security and guarantee for the stability of a free nation. Ligreater variety of matter than usual, embracing American berty has been crushed in France because the Bible was History, American Literature, and American Art. From the closed. The pillar of a free nation must be God's Word. number and quality of the papers that are constantly coming The Bible has been in our schools since the nation was to hand, we believe that the current volume will be of rare founded. There must be common schools and an educated value to American readers and students of American His community is the right to vote is to be given to all the cititory. Tbe articles in the MONTHLY, as a rule, are written But not simple knowledge will control them aright. expressly for its pages; the sole exception to this worth re- They must have the books that will make them God-fearing marking, is the paper “ By the Hon. Carl Schurz," in this In this light the Bible is the best book to mould the number, which is an abridgment (from notes) of a speech minds and characters so as to make good citizens. It condelivered in Faneuil Hall, Boston; the date is not recorded tains the highest and purest morality, and never hides the on our notes, and we cannot recall it; but it was fifteen or blackness of sin; it is grand and noble in its very simplicity. sixteen years ago.

It should not be a school book, but it should have an honored We have in reserve, to be inserted as rapidly as we can place in the schools; no party should have the power to put find space, some admirable papers by Isaac Smucker, George it out. Those who wish to put it out want to overturn the T. Hollyday, William A. Whitehead, William Wirt Henry, whole system of common schools. The Bible is too necesJohn B. Linn, Mrs. Ella Rodman Church, C. B. Carlile, sary to public schools for us to allow any party or church to S. P. Scott, Samuel Yorke At Lee, W. T. R. Saffell, Com- lay their hands upon it. As citizens of this country we must modore George H. Preble, Henry DuBois, Mrs. Gussie take heed lest, yielding the first step, sectarian bigots make De Bubna, Mrs. Elizabeth Oakes Smith, and by several other that step the vantage ground from which they shall crush our accomplished writers. The paper by Mr. Henry is a capital liberties. We need an open Bible in our homes, in our one, on his noble grandfather, Patrick Henry, prepared at schools, in our churches. our special request, and will probably appear in the May MONTH.Y; that by Mr. Hollyday is an excellent bio- How Scandal Grows and Travels.-Morrisville, Penn. graphical sketch, also written at our special request, of Mat. sylvania, affords a first-rate illustration of how scandal can thew Tilghman and his family, and will probably appear in travel and magnify from a very small and innocent matter. the June MONTHLY; that by Mr. Scott relates to Algernon The young pastor, Rev. Mr. Shields, was room-mate, it Sidney and William Penn, and will well repay perusa!; and seems, of the dry-goods storekeeper, and naturally was very the other papers are all on interesting topics, well treated. frequently in his friend's store, sometimes helping him. A

few days ago he bought forty-six cents worth of goods, leaned The Bible as an Educator.-At the First Reformed

over the counter, dropped a two dollar bill into the money. Church of Brooklyn, on Pierrepont street, near Monroe drawer, and took out the change. Some customers saw him, Place, a sermon was delivered recently by the pastor, the guessed he was stealing, and circulated the story in the vil. Rev. David Inglis, D.D., on the triumphs of Christianity lage. And speedily grew the tale that the young pastor was during the past century. The sermon was full of good

a veteran till.tapper, and had raided on nearly every money. things, but we can only give a few very short extracts :

drawer in town. But the church and the pastor went straightIt is right at the beginning of this year to look back upon way to work, and traced the scandal to its starting point. the hundred years just closed. In nearly the whole of Eu- The storekeeper and his two clerks explained the circumrope, one hundred years ago, absolute imperialism held full

stances, a vote of confidence was unanimously passed, and sway. The Protestants had been driven to the mountains, the little village is quiet once more. Civil and religious liberty were gone. Holland had absorbed some of the noblest blood and stoutest muscle in all Europe.

Pork-Packing in the West.--The Price Current (Cin. In England there was a spirit of wickedness or the blight of cinnati) has revised returns from a large number of porka cold formalism. In this country there were fourteen hun packing points. Interior points show a probable falling off dred ministers of the Gospel. Formalism had fallen upon for the entire season amounting to 5,050,000. The six lendthe churches. Now all over Europe there is a measure of

ing cities are now 370,000 behind the same date last year. civil and religious liberty. Prussia is a great Protestant em- Cincinnati weights are about the same as last year; Chicago, pire, and Italy is comparatively free. The Word of God is about eighteen pounds heavier; Louisville, seven pounds being spread in Spain. Missionary work has extended to heavier; and St. Louis, twenty-five pounds heavier. Interior China, to Japan, to India, to the Islands of the South Sea, points west of Indiana show a large increase in weight, and great triumphs have been won in the name of Christ. In Hogs continue of superior quality at all points ; the estimated America we have multiplied churches and common schools, packing at all points, including the six cities, indicate a poswhich are our strength.

sible falling off in numbers for the entire season amounting The lesson o: this history is that an open Bible is the only I to three-fourths of a million.

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