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Resolutions adopted by—Continued.

Page.

Tacoma Chamber of Commerce-

3548

Traffic Club of Cleveland..

3538

Traffic Club of New York..

3536

Union Pacific Board of Directors..

3553

Wisconsin Manufacturers' Association --

3546

Plans proposed by-

Eby, J. H.-

3514

Flanegan, W. A.

3502

Hart, John M.

3508

Hill, C. H..

3516

League for Industrial Justice.

3519

Philadelphia Bourse

2831

Whinery, S-

3506

Bills submitted by-

Jeffery, H. S..

3496

Rich, E. J.

3498

Warfield, S. Davies.

2834

Telegrams submitted by-

Chattanooga Manufacturers' Association..

3242

New York State Federation of Farm Bureaus

3242

Ohio State Industrial Traffic League--

3242

Editorials from-
Central Law Journal.

3239
Marine News.--

3237

Statistics :

Aspects of the transportation conference plan-

3557

Diagram of revenues and expenses of Class I roads_

3575

Operating deficit of Class II and III roads.

3560
Summaries of reports of Class I roads, 1918_

3564

Miscellaneous:

Comparison of the Cummins and Esch railroad bills_

3576

European railroad labor conditions ---

3166

Extracts from an address by Walker D. Hines..

3236

Index to the hearings on H. R. 4378_--

3577

Press notice of the United States Railroad Administration

3233
Standard form of contract United States Railroad Administration - 3477

Letters submitted by—

American Electric Railway Association...

3418

American Institute of Consulting Engineers.

3390

American Short Line Railroad Association.

3428

Anderson & Gustafson..

3458

Baker, Joseph L----

3301

Barr, W. B.

3420

Bayne, Howard

3358

Black, W. M----

3315

Bledsoe, S. T-

3375

Block, Henry W. C.--

3435

Boston Wool Trade Association..

3433

Boswell, L. B.--

3278

Catskill Evening Line---

3330

Chamber of Commerce of the United States..

3468

Chattanooga Jobbers' Association.

3388

Chicago Board of Trade_

3422

Citizens' National Railroads League..

3312

Clark, Edgar E-

3155, 3282, 3376

Clark, W. L-

3148, 3156

Cleveland Boosters' Club Co.

3386

Clinton, George -

26-18

Clyde Steamship Co

3342

Commercial Exchange of Philadelphia.

3329

Dubuque Commercial Club

3399

Dubuque Shippers' Association

3377

Eastman, Joseph B.----

3318

Edmonds, G. W..

3326

Electric Short Line Railway Co---

3383

Fairchild & Northeastern Railway Co-

3409

Farmers' National Council

3471
Letters submitted by—Continued.

[graphic]

Fort Smith & Western Railroad.

Fourche River Valley & I. T. Railway Co.

Fulbright, R. C.--

Gannon, Frank S.

Goodrich, E. P

Gothlin, 0. P-

Grover, Alfred..

Guaranty Trust Co. of New York.-

Haney, L. H.

Henderson, E. B.

Hendrick, Calvin W.

Hines, Walker D.

Hirsch, Gilbert

Hixon, F. PL-

Hobbs, Ernest S.

Iowa Southern Utilities Co---

Jennings, George C..

Johnson, Alba B.

Kruttschnitt, J

Law, Frank A.

Lawton, Peter S_

Lindenthal, Gustav

Lisman, F. J., & Co---

Lone Star Fish & Oyster Co---

McChord, C. C..

McCloud River Railroad Co..
Mackay, Clarence H
Manhattan Electrical Supply Co..
Mansfield Chamber of Commerce-
Manufacturers' Association of Connecticut-
Mecartney, Harry S..

Merchants Line_

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co--

Meyer, B. H.-

Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association

Milwaukee Association of Commerce

Mississippi Valley Waterways Association_

Missouri Telephone Association.

Monarch Furniture Co.

Moore, S. E. N-

Morawetz, Victor

Myrick, Herbert_

Natchez, Columbia & Mobile Railroad Co..

National Association of Credit Men ---

National Council of Farmers' Associations_

National Farmers' Association_

National Grange_--

National Industrial Traffic League_.

National Petroleum Association...

Negus, James D.

New York Committee of Shippers.

Norquist, A. C. Co______

North Carolina Pine Box Association.

Pacific Coast Traffic League_

Pacific Trading Corporation.

Paxson, J. W., Co----

Philadelphia Board of Trade_.

Port Huron Chamber of Commerce_

Portland Chamber of Commerce_

Prouty, C. A__

Rea, Samuel

Refractories Traffic Association

Rich, Edgar J-

Rubber Association of America

St. Louis Lumbermen's Exchange

St. Louis Merchants' Exchange --

[graphic]

PART 14.

RETURN OF THE RAILROADS TO PRIVATE OWNERSHIP.

COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE,

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Tuesday, September 16, 1919.

STATEMENT OF CAPT. S. W. BRYANT, UNITED STATES NAVY,

ACTING DIRECTOR OF NAVAL COMMUNICATIONS.

Capt. BRYANT. Admiral Bullard has prepared a memorandum for you, Mr. Chairman, I believe, on the question of radio transmission, or wireless and its regulation. To our minds the language of the bill is not clear, as to its intent in the proviso contained in the last five lines on page 2 and on the top of page 3. The CHAIRMAN.

Is that the committee print of the bill? Capt. BRYANT. That is H. R. 4378, at the bottom of page 2 and top of page 3. The question in our minds was whether or not this provision exempts the transmission of intelligence between a fixed point in the United States and a fixed point in a foreign country. It would seem to be desirable that the provision of the bill should not apply to transmission of this character, except as to the question of rates to and from shore radio stations, but rather that this should be controlled by international agreement. The regulations covering the transmission of intelligence by means of wireless telegraphy are provided by certain international conventions of which the United States is a signatory party, the one at present in force being the London convention of 1912. This convention, on account, presumably, of the youth of the art, distinctly reserved the regulation of the transmission of information or intelligence by wireless telegraphy between fixed points to the high contracting parties, having in mind, of course, fixed points in different countries and, naturally, claiming no jurisdiction concerning wireless communication between fixed points in one country, as that is a matter of national control and not an international affair.

Another thing, there does not seem to be anything in the bill that exempts the regulation of wireless transmission involving fixed land stations along our coast in communication with ships at sea. This question is entirely covered by the regulations of the present international treaty, and it is a question as to how far local laws would interfere with international treaties or international laws on the subject contained in the London convention or future international conventions.

Mr. HAMILTON. An act of Congress can supersede a treaty, and if we should choose to do that it could be done.

Capt. BRYANT. Yes, sir. The point I wanted to bring out was that it was already regulated by international treaties.

Mr. Hamilton. An act of Congress can supersede the treaty?

Capt. Bryant. Oh, yes,'sir; I understand that. In the London convention, where the international treaty was drawn up, the United States delegation made a reservation as to the matter of rates and abstained from any action with regard to rates. The question of rates has never been brought into question, as they have always been less than those that were arranged by international treaty or convention. We thought that it would not be wise to bring that class of transmission under the regulation of the Interstate Commerce Commission, except as to the question of rates to and from shore stations. We, of course, were very much in favor of that as to rates to or from shore stations. With us it is simply a question of the regulation of the transmission between shore stations and vessels at sea. It is suggested that a proviso might be added.

In line with my remarks concerning the transmission of intelligence by wireless between a fixed point in the United States and a fixed point in a foreign country, I have to recommend that the regiilation of such transmission be exempted. I suggest that the following be inserted in the bill H. R. No. 4378 after line 7, page 3:

The provisions of this act shall not apply to the transmission of intelligence by wireless (1) between coastal stations and ships at sea except in the matter of land line rates to and from the shore station, (2) between points in the United States and points in a foreign country, except in the matter of land line rates to and from the radio stations on United States territory.

The CHAIRMAN. Where would you put that?

Capt. Bryant. I suggest that might come in after line 7 on page 3, or wherever you think it would be most convenient.

The CHAIRMAN. At the end of a paragraph?

Capt. Bryant. Yes, sir. If the provisions of this act do apply to transmission between fixed points—that is, between one point in the United States and one point in a foreign country-I should like to have an opportunity to submit further data on that subject, Mr. Chairman.

The CHAIRMAN. You may extend your remarks in the record of the hearing

Capt. BRYANT. I will do so.

The CHAIRMAN. I do not think it was contemplated when the bill was prepared that it would cover communications between shore stations and vessels of the Navy at sea, that being departmental work under the jurisdiction of the Navy Department, and it ought not to be under the Interstate Commerce Commission.

Capt. Bryant. I was referring to our work in connection with the commercial business that is transmitted. We have to communicate from our coast stations with foreign ships as well as United States merchant ships. We do that business at our coast stations.

The CHAIRMAN. You have that service on the Pacific coast now to Hawaii and the East?

Capt. Bryant. Yes, sir; we maintain a service through to Japan and the Philippines.

The CHAIRMAN. A commercial service!

Capt. Bryant. Yes, sir; we have all of those stations now under the Navy Department.

The CHAIRMAN. The cables are not sufficient to carry the business? Capt. BRYANT. No, sir.

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