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OPINIONS OF THE PRESS. " It is written in a free and impartial manner, is lucid in its descriptions, surprisingly correct details, and many important features of the campaign, which have hitherto remained either whol] unnoticed, or else kept too much in shadow, are now brought forward into proper relief; whilst tł grand military operations of the period are delineated with the pen of an enlightened soldier. In word, by separating, with much discrimination, the gold from the dross, he has turned to exceller account the materials for his undertaking, which seem to have flowed to him from every quarter; an the consequence is, that a standard history has been produced, remarkable for its spirit and vigour, a well as for its truth."-U, S. Journal.

“We hail this work as a standard history of the Battle of Waterloo and of the Campaign Flanders—a worthy companion and sequel to the Peninsular Campaigns of Napier. A compilatio from the testimonies of eye-witnesses (as this is) had they been dressed up for publication, and subjecte individually to the public judgment, would have been cold and lifeless; bere all is freshness, vivacity unaffected truth; and thus is explained the very superior style of the writer, who possesses a nery and spring of thought and a brilliant colouring of phrase, combined with a transparent clearness o expression, such as is rarely attained by the purely literary writer, and seldom, if ever, found in con nection with profound, professional, and practical knowledge, as in this work. The most intimately acquainted with the scenery and incidents of the days of June, 1815, are loudest and most decided ir their admiration of the plans and portraits which embellish these volumes. The ground is engraved by a peculiar progress, which represents in relief the slightest elevation, and sinks the smallest depression by the peculiar curve and measure of the line. Thus, the spectator looks down upon the ground of the battle itself with the clear perception of all its undulations, and its every variety of form and aspect A second, and very different process, to which the plate is then subject, places in their positions the troops exactly as they occupied the field. These speaking plans have an accuracy hitherto unimagined, with an effect which is unequalled by any previous attempt. There are portraits of the Heroes of the campaigo, which have as much merit as novelty-being engraved medallions--perfect portraits in high relief.” Naval and Military Gazette.

“ The eventful victory which these two splendid volumes are intended to commemorate has had many historians, but none so good or comprehensive as Captain Siborne. His facility of access to official documents, both English and foreign, the assistance which he has received from the surviving Waterloo heroes of all ranks, and the zeal, energy, and talent, which he has displayed in the construction of his materials, have produced a record, not only of the battle itself, but of the whole Waterloo campaign, which is likely to be as enduring as it is creditable to his talents as a writer, and his reputation as a soldier. For ourselves we heartily thank Captain Siborne for his spirited volumes, and sincerely do we hope they will meet their due reward. Of this we are certain, they cannot be too soon in the hands, not only of every Officer of the Service, but also of every civil member of the community.”—United Service Gazette.

“We cannot feel our debt acquitted to Captain Siborne for the pleasure and instruction his work has afforded us, if we did not bring our unqualified testimony to the minute accuracy of detail, the highly honourable and soldier-like spirit, and the admirable candour and fairness by which it is everywhere characterized. When the work was first announced for publication, we conceived great expectations from a history.compiled by one whose access to every source of information was favoured both by interest in the highest quarters, and the circumstances of an official appointment on the staff. We were not disappointed. Such are the volumes before us—a Military Classic-and they will remain so while Waterloo is a word to stir the heart and nerve the arm of a British soldier.”—Dublin University, May.

“ This work is precisely what such a publication should be, a fair, impartial compilation of well authenticated testimony relative to the great events to which it has reference, interspersed with such reflections as have appeared to the author to be needful for the guidance of his unprofessional readers."

Morning Post. “ The accounts already published vary so much, and so little reliance is to be placed upon some of the details that we feel no apology to be requisite for noticing a work so faithful and excellent as that which has been recently published by Captain Siborne. Of all the accounts we have yet seen, that recently published by Captain Siborne is the fullest, the fairest, we believe the most accurate-the best."

Times, Jan. 1845. “We can declare in all sincerity that we have perused his narrative of marches and onslaughts with infinite satisfaction. He tells his tale with singular clearness. He is at home all the varied movements and changes of position, &c.; and his account of Cavalry Charges, especially in the affair of Quatre Bras, the advance of columns and cannonading, sweep you onwards as if the scene described were actually passing under your eyes. His Plans and Charts too are excellent, and every way worthy of the modellist of the Field of Waterloo. We thank Captain S., not only for the amusement we have derived from his performance, but for the opportunity with which the appearance of a genuine English History of the Battle of Waterloo supplies us, of refuting some of the errors regarding it into which other historians have fallen.”-Fraser's Mag.

PUBLISHED BY T. &. W. BOONE, 29, NEW BOND STREET, LONDON ;

AND SOLD BY
OLIVER AND BOYD, AND FRASER AND CO. EDINBURGH.

PUBLISHED BY T. & W. BOONE,

29, NEW BOND STREET.

MAJOR-GENERAL W. F. P. NAPIER'S HISTORY OF THE WAR IN THE PENINSULA

AND THE SOUTH OF FRANCE.

NOW COMPLETE, IN 6 vols. 8vo. containing 4104 pages, and 55 Plans, price £6.

The Volumes sold separately, price 20s. each. " THE FAITHFUL, IMPARTIAL, AND ELOQUENT HISTORIAN.

Sir Robert Peel's Speech. The great work of General Napier does undoubtedly record it, (national tribute to those engaged in the Peninsular War) and will continue to do so as long as the English language shall last.”—Times:

ALSO, BY MAJOR-GENERAL NAPIER. A REPLY TO LORD STRANGFORD'S " OBSERVATIONS” on some passages

in Colonel NAPIER's History of the War in the Peninsula. Second Edition, 8vo. price ls.

A REPLY TO VARIOUS OPPONENTS, particularly to “ Strictures on Colonel

Napier's History of the War in the Peninsula," together with Observations illustrating Sir John Moore's Campaign. 8vo. price 2s.

MAJOR-GENERAL NAPIER'S JUSTIFICATION OF HIS THIRD VOLUME,

forming a Sequel to his Reply to various Opponents, and containing some new and curious facts relative to the BATTLE OF ALBUERA. 8vo. price 1s. 6d.

A LETTER TO GENERAL LORD VISCOUNT BERESFORD, being an answer

to his Lordship’s assumed Refutation of Colonel Napier's Justification of his Third Volume. 8vo. price 1s. 6d.

COUNTER-REMARKS TO MR. DUDLEY MONTAGU PERCEVAL'S RE

MARKS upon some Passages in Colonel Napier's Fourth Volume of his History of the Peninsular War. In 8vo. price 1s. 6d.

The above Pamphlets are required to complete the early Editions.

Second Edition, complete in 1 vol. 8vo. with Plans,

THE CONQUEST OF SCINDE,
WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE MILITARY TRANSACTIONS AND BATTLES OF

Major-General Sir Charles J. Napier in that country.
BY MAJOR-GENERAL W. F. P. NAPIER,

Author of History of the War in the Peninsula.“ As a commentary upon some remarkable political events, and daring military achievements, this volume will rapidly find a place in every soldier's library.”—Atlas.

“ The Author is the historian of the Peninsular War, whose connection by blood with the gallant conqueror of Scinde affords a security for the authenticity of bis sources of information - some of which are the letters of Sir Charles himself—and whose high character, as an author, as well as a soldier, is a guarantee for his fidelity in the use of his ample materials. We may add to the Author's other qualifications, an unflinching intrepid honesty, which makes him speak out, and utter the plain truth without considering whether it be unpalatable.”—Asiatic Journal.

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Published by T. & W. Boone, 29, New Bond Street.

Royal Quarto, on Indian Paper, price 1s. 6d.

PORTRAIT OF

MAJOR-GENERAL SIR CHARLES JAMES NAPIER,

CONQUEROR OF SCINDE.

FROM A SKETCH BY MAJOR-GENERAL W. F. P. NAPIER,

" I must say that, after giving the fullest consideration to those operations, that I have never known an instance of a general officer who has shewn to a higher degree than he has done all the requisite qualifications to enable him to conduct great operations. He has inanifested the utmost discretion and prudence in the formation of his plans, the utmost activity in perfecting his preparations to ensure success; and finally the utmost zeal, gallantry, and science, in carrying those plans and preparations into execution. I must say that the march of General Napier against Emaum Ghur was one of the most extraordinary marches I ever read of; and it was, I must say, most completely successful. He marched the arıny through the desert, with all the heavy guns, transporting all his materiel as well, and by this extraordinary march he deprived the enemy of all means of retreat.”— Speech of the Duke of Wellington.

16 The taking of the fort of Emaum Ghur, was one of the most brilliant affairs ever undertaken and executed.”-Speech of the Earl of Ripon.

“ To the example which he set the troops-inspiring an unparalleled confidence in their commander,we must mainly attribute the success of the actions of Meeanee and Hyderabad."-Speech of Sir Robert Peel.

In one volume 8vo. price 7s. boards,
REMARKS ON MILITARY LAW

AND THE PUNISHMENT OF FLOGGING. BY MAJOR-GENERAL SIR CHARLES JAMES NAPIER, K.C.B. « This work, we have several times taken occasion to remark, is far less known than it deserves to be, especially among the profession. It abounds in lessons of profound wisdom, delivered in the clearest language, and it is as modestly as it is ably written; nor have we often met with a more amusing book. There are to be found in it many interesting and characteristic anecdotes, and there is a vein of quiet humour that is very diverting, but which interferes not at all with the serious purpose of the author, who has left upon every page traces of a benevolent heart and sound intellect."--Naval and Military Gazette.

In a Box, price 10s. 6d.
MILITARY FIGURES

FOR THE

PRACTICE AND EXPLANATION

OF THE

“EXERCISE AND EVOLUTIONS OF THE ARMY,

According to Her Majesty's Regulations ;
Arranged for the Company, Battalion, and Light Infantry,

BY MAJOR HOSKINS, K.H, Major Hopkins, of the old 43rd, in which corps he served with distinction, has invented a set of Military Figures, arranged for the illustration and practice of the evolutions of the Infantry, according to Her Majesty's regulations, and exceedingly well calculated to effect their object. Being adapted to the movements either of the Battalion, Company, or Light Infantry, these Figures, which are accompanied by an Explanatory Pamphlet, and are very properly dedicated to Lord Fitzroy Somerset, will be very useful to young officers of the Infantry.”United Service Journal.

Published by T. & W. BOONB, 29, New Bond Street.

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The THIRD EDITION, in one vol. post 8vo. price 10s. 6d. bds. of
ADVENTURES IN THE RIFLE BRIGADE,

IN THE
PENINSULA, FRANCE, AND THE NETHERLANDS,

FROM THE YEAR 1809 TO 1815,

BY CAPTAIN JOHN KINCAID, FIRST BATTALION, “ An admirable little book."- Quarterly Review.

* To those who are unacquainted with John Kincaid of the Rifles,—and few, we trow, of the old Peninsula bands are in this ignorant predicament, and to those who know him, we equally recommend the perusal of his book : it is a fac-simile of the man -a perfect reflection of his image, veluti in speculo. A capital Soldier, a pithy and graphic narrator, and a fellow of infinite jest. Captain Kincaid has given us, in this modest volume, the impress of his qualities, the beau ideal of a thorough-going Soldier of Service, and the faithful and witty history of some six years' honest and triumphant fighting.

" There is nothing extant in a Soldier's Journal, which, with so little pretension, paints with such truth and raciness the 'domestic economy' of campaigning, and the down-right business of handling the enemy.

“But we cannot follow further ;-recommending every one of our readers to pursue the Author himself to his crowning scene of Waterloo, where they will find him as quaint and original as at his debut. We assure them, it is not possible, by isolated extracts, to give a suitable impression of the spirit and originality which never flag from beginning to end of Captain Kincaid's volume; in every page of which he throws out flashes of native humour, a tithe of which would make the fortune of a Grub-street Bookmaker."- United Service Journal. “ His book has one fault, the rarest fault in books, it is too short.”

Monthly Magazine, April.

Also, by the same Author, Second Edition, in one vol. post 8vo. price 10s. 6d. RANDOM SHOTS FROM A RIFLEMAN. “ It is one of the most pithy, witty, soldier-like, and pleasant books in existence."

United Service Journal. “ The present volume is to the full as pleasant, and what is still more strange, as original as the last. Criticism would become a sinecure if many such volumes were written : all left for us is to admire and recommend.”-New Monthly Magazine.

“ The present volume is likely to add to his reputation. It is a useful Appendix to the larger works of Napier and other military commentators. It is never dull, tedious, technical, or intricate.”- Times.

“ Those who have read Captain Kincaid's Adventures in the Rifle Brigade will seize this volume with avidity, and having dashed through it, will lay it down with only one feeling of regret-that it is not longer."-News.

Elegantly bound in the Uniform of the Regiment, 1 vol. post 8vo. price 108. 6d.

THE ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN JOHN PATTERSON, With Notices of the Officers, 8c. of the 50th, or Queen's Own Regiment,

FROM 180 TO 1821. DEDICATED BY PERMISSION TO QUEEN ADELAIDE. " This volume contains a well-written, yet unvarnished narrative, of the adventures of the 50th foot, (better known as the ' Dirty Half-hundred,' from their black facings), during the Peninsular war. It argues well for the bravery, as well as modesty, of Captain Patterson, that throughout his work we have but little of himself, and much of his brother officers.”Bell's Messenger.

“ Captain Patterson's Adventures are the record of a brave soldier-of a dashing, bigh-minded British officer, who never fears a rival, and never knew what it was to have an enemy, or to hate any man. His descriptions are remarkable for their vividness and accuracy, and his anecdotes will bear repetition once a week for life.”-Sun.

“ Captain Patterson is one of the pleasantest of the numerous tribe of gallant officers who has done so much credit to the British name, by fighting and writing with equal spirit."-Constitutional.

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Published by T. & W. Boone, 29, New Bond Street.

In 2 vols. 8vo. cloth, price 248.
HISTORICAL RECORD

OF THE

ROYAL MARINE FORCES,

From their Formation to the Present Time,

INCLUDING

AN ACCOUNT OF THEIR SERVICES IN CHINA,

BY P. H. NICOLAS,

LIEUT. ROYAL MARINES.

“Mr. Nicolas has had a wide and fertile field to work upon, and excellently bas he turned his materials to account. Impelled by a sincere attachment for his old comrades, by an ardent desire for their welfare, by the very natural wish for a more minute and connected narrative of their daring career tban has hitherto been given to the world, he has produced a luminous and comprebensive work, than which none can be better of its class, and which reflects equal credit upon his feelings as an officer, and bis talents as a writer.United Service Guzette.

“ These volumes cannot fail to prove eminently acceptable to the members of the gallant corps, whose honours they record, and generally indeed to the military service of both arms.”—Naval and Military Gazette.

• It is historical, and must interest all historical readers; it is proudly national, and speaks to the heart of every Englishman ; wbile to the sailor, the soldier, and especially the marine, whose services it chronicles, it will prove a valuable record, It is a work, which for historical information, and clearness of arrangement, may fairly compete with any of its class." — Literary Gazette.

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In Two Volumes, post 8vo. price 21s.

COMMODORE SIR CHARLES NAPIER'S

ACCOUNT OF THE WAR IN PORTUGAL.

BETWEEN DON PEDRO AND DON MIGUEL;

WITH PLANS OF HIS ACTION OPP CAPE ST. VINCENT.

“ If we read the account of that naval action in which, with a force wholly unequal, had it not been directed by the utmost skill and valour, to compete with the enemyif we read the account of that action in which, in the space of five minutes, a signal victory was achieved, by which the glory of St. Vincent was revived—I say, if we read the records of such an action, we shall find that the commander bore the name of Napier.”—Speech of Sir Robert Peel.

“ An excellent and spirit-stirring book-plain, honest, and straight-forward—the very stuff of which the web of histoty alone should be composed. This is indeed an honest, fair, and impartial history.”—Morning Chronicle.

“ In spirit and in keeping, from beginning to end, Admiral Napier's War in Portugal,' is the happiest picture we could conceive of the battle off Cape St. Vincentits especial excellence consisting in a regardless bluntness of manner and language that is quite admirable and delightful."— Monthly Review.

“ It is Cæsar's Commentaries in the first person.”—Spectator.

“ Candid to a degree, and sincere as a sailor's will. This is the very stuff of which history should be composed.”Bell's Messenger.

“ If Admiral Napier be not distinguished by the common-place facilities of authorship, he possesses the higher qualities of truth, discretion, and clear-sightedness, in no slight degree.”-Atlas.

« In speaking of himself and his deeds, he has hit the just and difficult mediumshewing his real feelings, yet steering clear of affected modesty on the one hand, and of over-weening modesty on the other.”Tait's Magazine.

“ This is a very graphic account of the affairs in which the gallant author figured so nobly, and added fresh lustre to the name of Napier."-News.

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