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Our thrissles flourish'd fresh and fair,

And bonnie bloom'd our roses ; But Whigs came like a frost in June,

And wither'd a' our posies.

Our ancient crown's fa'n in the dust

Deil blin' them wi' the stour o't ; And write their name in his black beuk, Wha

gae the Whigs the power o't.

Our sad decay in church and state

Surpasses my descriving;
The Whigs came o'er us for a curse,

And we hae done wi' thriving.

Grim vengeance lang has ta'en a nap,

But we may see him wauken ;
Gude help the day when royal heads
Are hunted like a maukin.
Awa, Whigs, awa!

Awa, Whigs, awa!
Ye're but a pack o' traitor louns,

Ye'll do nae guid at a'.

WHERE HAE YE BEEN.

Tune Killicrankie."

WHERE hae ye been sae braw, lad ?

Where hae ye been sae brankie, O ? O, where hae ye been sae braw, lad ?

Cam ye by Killicrankie, 0 ?
An ye had been where I hae been,

Ye wadna been sae cantie, 0;
An ye had seen what I hae seen,

On the braes o' Killicrankie, 0.

I fought at land, I fought at sea ;

At hame I fought my auntie, 0;
But I met the devil and Dundee,

On the braes o' Killicrankie, 0.
The bauld Pitcur fell in a furr,

And Clavers got a clankie, 0;
Or I had fed an Athole gled

On the braes o' Killicrankie, O.

O GUDE ALE COMES.*

gars me sell

O GUDE ale comes and gude ale goes
Gude ale

my hose,
Sell

my hose, and pawn my shoon,
Gude ale keeps my heart aboon.
I had sax owsen in a pleugh,
They drew a' weel eneugh ;
I sell’d them a' just ane by ane,
Gude ale keeps my heart aboon.

Gude ale hauds me bare and busy,
Gars me moop wi' the servant hizzie
Stand i' the stool when I hae done,
Gude ale keeps my heart aboon.
() gude ale comes and gude ale goes,
Gude ale gars me sell my hose,
Sell my hose, and pawn my shoon,
Gude ale keeps my heart aboon.

* Burns made only a few slight verbal emendations on this old song, to suit it for publication in the Museum.-M.

SIMMER'S A PLEASANT TIME.

Tune—“Aye waukin 0."

SIMMER's a pleasant time,

Flow'rs of ev'ry colour ;
The water rins o'er the heugh,
And I long for my true lover.

Aye waukin 0,

Waukin still and wearie:
Sleep I can get nane

For thinking on my dearie. When I sleep I dream,

When I wauk I'm eerie ; Sleep I can get nane

For thinking on my dearie.
Lanely night comes on

A' the lave are sleepin';
I think on my bonnie lad,
And I bleer my een with greetin'.

Aye waukin o,

Waukin still and wearie :
Sleep I can get nane
For thinking on my

dearie.

JAMIE, COME TRY ME.

Tune" Jamie, come try me."

CHORUS.

Jamie, come try me,
Jamie, come try me ;
If thou would win my love,
Jamie, come try me.

If thou should ask my love,

Could I deny thee ?
If thou would win my love,

Jamie, come try me.

If thou should kiss me, love,
Wha could espy

thee?
If thou wad be my love,
Jamie, come try me.

Jamie, come try me,
Jamie, come try me;
If thou would win my love,
Jamie, come try me.

THE CAPTAIN'S LADY.*

Tune—“O mount and go."

CHORUS

O mount and go,

Mount and make you ready ;
O mount and go,

And be the captain's lady.

WHEN the drums do beat,

And the cannons rattle,
Thou shalt sit in state,

And see thy love in battle.

When the vanquish'd foe
Sues for

peace

and quiet, To the shades we'll go,

And in love enjoy it.

This is ascribed to Burns by Mr Cromek, who found it in the poet's handwriting among the papers of Johnson, the publisher of the Museum. Burns never acknowledged it. --M.

O mount and go,

Mount and make you ready :
O mount and go,

And be the captain's lady.

BEWARE O' BONNIE ANN.*

Tune—“ Ye gallants bright.”

YE gallants bright, I red ye right,

Beware o' bonnie Ann;
Her comely face, sae fu'o' grace,

Your heart she will trepan.
Her een sae bright, like stars by night,

Her skin is like the swan ;
Sae jimply laced her genty waist,

That sweetly ye might span.

Youth, grace, and love attendant move

And pleasure leads the van ;
In a' their charms and conquering arms,

They wait on bonnie Ann.
The captive bands may chain the hands,

But love enslaves the man ;
Ye gallants braw, I red ye

a'
Beware o' bonnie Ann.

• The heroine of this song was Ann Masterton, daughter of Allan Masterton, one of the poet's steadfast friends, and author of the air of Strathallan's Lament.--M.

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