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She lets thee to wot, that she has thee forgot,
And for ever disowns thee, her ain Jock Rab.
O had I ne'er seen thee, my Eppie M.Nab!
O had I ne'er seen thee, my Eppie M.Nab!
As light as the air, and fause as thou's fair,
Thou's broken the heart o'thy ain Jock Rab.

THE COOPER O' CUDDIE.

Tune" Bab at the bowster.”

The cooper o' Cuddie cam' here awa,
And ca’d the girrs out owre us a'-
And our gude wife has gotten a ca'

That anger'd the silly gude-man, O.
We'll hide the cooper behind the door,
Behind the door, behind the door ;
We'll hide the cooper behind the door,

And cover him under a mawn, 0.

He sought them out, he sought them in,
Wi', deil hae her! and, deil hae him !
But the body was sae doited and blin',

He wist na where he was gaun, O.

They cooper'd at e'en, they cooper'd at morn,
'Till our gude-man has gotten the scorn ;
On ilka brow she's planted a horn,

And swears that they shall stan', 0.
We'll hide the cooper behind the door,
Behind the door, behind the door ;
We'll hide the cooper behind the door,

And cover him under a mawn, 0.

* In this song Burns did little more than prune it a little of its indelicacy. Even as it stands it is more witty than decorous. -M.

LOVELY POLLY STEWART.

Tune-" Ye're welcome, Charlie Stewart."

O LOVELY Polly Stewart !

O charming Polly Stewart !
There's not a flower that blooms in May

That's half so fair as thou art.
The flower it blaws, it fades and fa's,

And art can ne'er renew it;
But worth and truth eternal youth

Will give to Polly Stewart.

May he whose arms shall fauld thy charms

Possess a leal and true heart;
To him be given to ken the heaven

He grasps in Polly Stewart.
O lovely Polly Stewart !

O charming Polly Stewart!
There's ne'er a flower that blooms in May

That's half so sweet as thou art.

THE HIGHLAND LADDIE.*

Tune--" If thou'lt play me fair play."

The bonniest lad that e'er I saw,

Bonnie laddie, Highland laddie ;
Wore a plaid, and was fu' braw,

Bonnie Highland laddie.
On his head a bonnet blue,

Bonnie laddie, Highland laddie ;

* A long ditty, entitled the “ Highland Lad and the Lowland Lassie,” was the basis of this song. Burns compressed it within singing dimensions.-M.

His loyal heart was firm and true,

Bonnie Highland laddie.

Trumpets sound, and cannons roar,

Bonnie lassie, Lowland lassie ; And a' the hills wi' echoes roar,

Bonnie Lowland lassie. Glory, honour, now invite,

Bonnie lassie, Lowland lassie, For freedom and my king to fight,

Bonnie Lowland lassie.

The sun a backward course shall take,

Bonnie laddie, Highland laddie,
Ere aught thy manly courage shake,

Bonnie Highland laddie.
Go, for yourself procure renown,

Bonnie laddie, Highland laddie.
And for your

lawful king, his crown, Bonnie Highland laddie.

LOVELY DAVIES.

Tune- Miss Muir."

O how shall I, unskilfu’, try

The poet's occupation, The tunefu' powers, in happy hours,

That whisper inspiration ? Even they maun dare an effort mair,

Than aught they ever gave us, Or they rehearse, in equal verse,

The charms o’lovely Davies.

Each eye it cheers, when she appears, Like Phæbus in the morning,

When past the shower and ev'ry flower,

The garden is adorning. As the wretch looks o'er Siberia's shore,

When winter-bound the wave is; Sae droops our heart when we maun part

Frae charming lovely Davies.

Her smile's a gift, frae 'boon the lift,

That make's us mair than princes ; A scepter'd hand, a king's command,

Is in her darting glances :
The man in arms, 'gainst female charms,

Even he her willing slave is ;
He hugs his chain, and owns the reign

Of conquering, lovely Davies.

My muse to dream of such a theme,

Her feeble pow'rs surrenders ; The eagle's gaze alone surveys

The sun's meridian sp.endours : I wad in vain essay the strain,

The deed too daring brave is ; I'll drap the lyre, and mute admire

The charms o’ lovely Davies.

NITHSDALE'S WELCOME HAME.

The noble Maxwells and their powers

Are coming o'er the border,
And they'll gae bigg Terreagle's towers,

And set them a' in order.
And they declare Terreagle's fair,

For their abode they choose it;
There's no a heart in a'the land,

But's lighter at the news o't.

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As I was a-wand'ring ae midsummer e’enin',

The pipers and youngsters were making their game; Amang them I spied my faithless fause lover,

Which bled a' the wounds o' my dolour again. Weel, since he has left me, may pleasure gae wi' him ;

I may be distress’d, but I winna complain ; I flatter my fancy I may get anither,

My heart it shall never be broken for ane.

I couldna get sleeping till dawin for greetin',

The tears trickled down like the hail and the rain ; Had I na got greetin', my heart wad a broken,

For, oh I love forsaken's a tormenting pain. Weel, since he has left me, may pleasure gae wi' him ;

I may be distress'd, but I winna complain ; I flatter my fancy I may get anither,

My heart it shall never be broken for ane.

Although he has left me for greed o’the siller,

I dinna envy him the gains he can win ; I rather wad bear a' the lade o’my sorrow

Than ever hae acted sae faithless to him.

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