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DENE'ANOVR. n. s. [demener, Fr.) Car

carries a ball of six inches five eigbths riage ; behaviour.

diameter, and thirty-six pounds weigit. Of so insupportable a pride he that where

Dict, his deeds might well stir envy, his demeanar did What! this a sleeve? 't is like a demi-canze. rather breed disdain. Sidney.

Shakspear. Angels best like us when we are most like Ten engines, that shall be of equal force either unto them in all parts of decent demeanour. to a cannon or demi-cannon, culverin or dem.

Hooker. culverin, may be framed at the same price that His gestures fierce one of these will amount to.

Wilkias. He markd, and mad demeanour; then alone, DEMI-CULVERIN. n. $. [demi and cal. As he suppos'd, all unobserv'd, unseen. Milton.

verin.] Thus Eve, with sad demeanour meek: Ill worthy i.

Milton.

DemI-CULVERIN of the lowest Size. A He was of a courage not to be daunted: which gun four inches two eightbs diameter in was manifested in all his actions; especially in his the bore, and ten foot long. It carries whole demeanour at Rhee, both at the landing a ball four inches diameter, and nine and upon the retreat.

Clarendon.

pounds weight. DEMEANS. 9. s. pl. properly demesnes. DeMI-CULVERIN Ordinary. A gun four An estate in lands; that which a man

inches four eighths diameter in the bore, possesses in his own right. To DEME'NTATE. v. n. [demento, Lat.]

ten foot long. It carries a ball four

- inches two eighths diameter, and ten To make mad, or frantick. DEMENTATION. n. so {dementatio, Lat.] DemI-CULVERIN, elder Sort. A gun four

pounds eleven ounces weight. Making mad, or frantick.

inches and six eighths diameter in the DEME'RIT. n. s. (demérite, Fr. from de

bore, ten foot one third in length. It meritus, of demereor, Latin.]

carries a ball four inches four eighth 1. The opposite to merit ; ill-deserving ;

pärtsdiameter, and twelve pounds eleven what makes one worthy of blame or

ounces weight.

Military Dict. punishment.

They continue a perpetual volley of dewi They should not be able once to stir, or to culverins.

Raleigh. murmur, but it should be known, and they shortened according to their demerits. Spenser.

The army left two demi-culserins, and two other good guns.

Clarendon. Thou liv'st by me, to me thy breath resign; DEMI-DEVIL. a. s. (demi and devil] Mine is the merit, the demerit thine. Dryden. Whatever they acquire by their industry or

Partaking of infernal nature ; half a ingenuity, should be secure, unless forfeited by

devil. any demerit or offence against the custom of the

Will you, I pray, demand that demi-deuil, family,

Temple.

Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body? 2. Anciently the same with merit; desert.

Sbakspear. l'fetch my life and being

DEMI-GOD. n. s. [demi and god.] Par. From men of royal siege; and my demerits

taking of divine nature ; half a god ; an May speak, unbonnetting, to as proud a fortune As this that I have reach'd. Sbakspeare:

hero produced by the cohabitation of T. DEME'RIT. v. a. [demeriter, Fr.] 'To

divinities with mortals.

He took his leave of them ; whose eyes bade deserve blame or punishment.

him farewell with tears, making temples to him DEME'RSED. adj. [from demersus, of de

as to a demi-god.

Sidery - mergo, Latin.] Plunged; drowned. Be gods, or angels, demi.gods. Milton,

Dict. Transported demi-gods stood round; DEME'RSION. N.'s. (demersio, Lat.]

And men grew heroes at the sound, 1. A drowning

Enflam'd with glory's charms.

Papel

Nay, half in heav'n ; except (what's miglay 2. [In chymistry.] The putting any medi

odd) cine in a dissolving liquor. Dict. A fit of vapours clouds this demi-god.

Pepe. DEME'SNE. See DEMAIN.

DEMI-LANCE. n. s.

(demi and lance.] A DE'MI. inseparable particle. [demi, Fr. light lance; a short spear; a half-pike.

dimidium, Latin.) Half; one of two On their steeld heads their demi-lances worę equal parts. This word is only used in Small pennons, which their ladies colours boré.

Drydes. composition: as demi.god; that is, half

Light demi-lances from afar they throw, human, half divine.

Fasteu'd with leathern thongs, to gall the foe. DEMI-CANNON.n. s. [demi and cannon.]

Dryas DEMI.CANNON Lowest. A great gun that DEMI-MAN. n. s. [demi and man.] Half a

carries a ball of thirty pounds weight man : a terın of reproach. and six inches diameter. The diameter We'must adventure this bacple, lest we perish of the bore is six inches two eighth parts. by the complaints of this barking demi-man. Dict.

Asolks. DEMI-CANNON Ordinary: A great gun

DEMI-WOLF. 1. 3. [demi and wolf.) Half six inches four eighths diameter in the

a wolf; a mongrel dog between a dog bore, twelve foot long. It carries a shot

and wolf: iscisca. six inches one sixth diameter, and thirty

Spaniels, curs,

Showghs, water-rugs, and demi-wolves, are two pounds weight.

Dict.

'cleped DÉMI-CANNON of the greatest Size. A All by the name of dogs. Shakspeare's Macbeté.

gun six inches and six eighth parts dia- DEMI'SE. n. s. (trom demeire, demis, de meter in the bore, twelve foot long. It mise, Fr.] Death ; decease. It is sel,

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DE'M AGOGUE. n. s. [Impcywne.) A ring. turn his wishes into demands, will be but a little leader of the rabble ; a popular and

way from thinking he ought to obtain them. factious orator.

Locke. Who were the chief demagogues and patrons

2. A question ; an interrogation. of tumults, to send for them,

to flatter and em

3. The calling for a thing in prder to pure bolden them.

King Charles. chase it. A plausible, insignificant word, in the mouth My bookseller tells me, the demand for those of an expert demagogue, is a dangerous and my papers increases daily.

Addison. dreadful weapon.

South. 4. [In law.] The asking of what is due. Demosthenes and Cicero, though each of

It hath also a proper signification disthem a leader, or, as the Greeks called it, a de

tinguished from plaint; for all civil magogue, in a popular state, yet seem to differ in their practice.

Swift.

actions are pursued either by demands DEMAIN.

or plaints, and the pursuer is called DEME'AN.

n. s. [domaine, French.] demandant or plaintiff. There are two DEME'SNE.

manners of demands; the one of deed, 1. That land which a man holds originally

the other in law : in deed, as in every of himself, called dominium by the civi- præcipe, there is express demand; in lians; and opposed to feudum, or fee, law, as every entry in land, distress for which signifies those that are held of a rent, taking or seising of goods, and superior lord. It is sometimes used also such like acts, wbich may be done withfor a distinction between those lands that out any words, are demands in law, the lord of the manor has in his own

Blount. hands, or in the hands of his lessee, de- DeMA'NDABLE. adj. [from demand.]. mised or let upon a rent for a term of

That may be demanded, requested,

asked for. years or life, and such other lands ap

All sums demandable, for licence of alienation pertaining to the said manor as belong

to be made of lands holdan in chief, have been to free or copyholders. Pbillips.

stayed in the way to the hanaper. Bacon. 2. Estate in land.

DEM A'NDANT. n. s. [from demand.]
Having now provided

1. He who is actor or plaintiff in a real A gentleman of noble parentage, Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly allied.

action, because he demandeth lands. Sbakspeare.

Coke. That earldom indeed had a royal jurisdiction 2. A plaintiff; one that demands redress. and seigniory, though the lands of that county in One of the witnesses deposed, that dining on demesne were possessed for the most part by the á Sunday with the demandant, whose wife had ancient inheritors.

D.avies.

sat below the squire's lady at church, she the 3. Land adjoining to the mansion, kept in said wife dropped some expressions, as if she the lord's own hand.

thought her husband ought be knighted. Those acts for planting forest-trees have

Spectator. hitherto been w hollý ineffectual, except about DEMA’NDER. n. s. [demandeur, Fr.] the demesnes of a few gentlemen: and even there, 1. One that requires a thing with au

in general, very unskilfully made. Swift. thority. TO DEMA'ND. v. a. (demander, Fr.] 2. One that asks a question. 1. To claim ; to ask for with authority. 3. One that asks for a thing in order to The pound of flesh, which I demand of him,

purchase it. Is dearly bought; 't is mine, and I will have it.

They grow very fast and fat; which also bete.

Sbakspeare. tereth iheir taste, and delivereth them to the dee 2. To question ; to interrogate.

mander's ready use at all seasons.

Carece. And when Uriah was come unto him, David

4. A dunner; one that demands a debt. demanded of him how Joab did, and how the

DEME'An. n. s. (from demener, Fr.] A people did, and how the war prospered?

2 Samuel.

mien; presence; carriage; demeanour; If any

friend of Cæsar's demand why Brutus deportinent. rose against Cæsar, this is my answer : Not that

At his feet, with sorrowful demean, I loved Cæsar less, but that I loved Rome more. And deadly hue, an armed corse did lie. Svakspeare.

Spenser. Young one,

To DEME'AN. v. a. [from demener, Fr.] Inform us of thiy fortunes; for, it seems,

1. To behave ; to carry one's self. They crave to be demandet.

Sbakspeare.

Those plain and legible lines of duty requiring The oracle of Apollo being demanded, when

us to demean ourselves to God humbly and dethe war and inisery of Greece should have an

voutly, to our governors obediently, and to our end, replied, When they would double the altar

neighbours justly, and to ourselves soberly and in Delos, which was of a cubick form. Peacham on Geometry. temperately.

Soutb.

A man cannot doubt but that there is a God; 3. [In law.] To prosecute in a real action.

and that, according as he demeans himself toDEMA'ND. n. s. (demande, Fr.]

wards him, he will make him happy or miserable 1. A claim; a chailenging; the asking of

for ever.

Tiliotson. any thing with authority.

Strephon had long perplex'd his brains, This matter is by the decree of the watchers,

How with so luich a nymph he might and the demon by the word of the holy ones.

Demean himself the wedding-night.

Donid. 2. To lessen; to debase; to undervalue.Giving vent, gives life and strength, to our Now, out of doubt, Antipholis is inad; appetites; and he that has the contidence to Else he would never so dem:an himself. Slaksp.

Strift.

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DENE'ANOUR. n. s. [demener, Fr.] Car- carries a ball of six inches fire eigbthe riage ; behaviour.

diameter, and thirty-six pounds weight. Of so instipportable a pride he wao, that where

Dict, his deeds might well stir envy, his demeantur did What! this a sleeve? 't is like a derni-count, rather breed disdain. Sidney.

Skakspeare Angels best like us when we are most like Ten engines, that shall be of equal force eita unto them in all parts of decert demeanour. to a cannon or demi-cannea, culverin oz derni

Hooker. culverin, may be framed at the same price that His gestures fierce one of these will amount to.

Hikin. He mark'd, and mad demeanour; then alone, DEMI-CULVERIN. n. š. [demi and ca. As he suppos'd, all unobserv'd, unseen. Milton.

verin.] Thus Eve, with sad demeanour meek: Ill worthy i.

Milton.

DEMI-CULVERIN of the lowest Size. A He was of a courage not to be daunted: Which gun four inches two eighths diameter is was manifested in all his actions; especially in his the bore, and ten foot long. It carries whole demcanour at Rhee, both at the landing a ball four inches diameter, and nine and upon the retreat.

Clarendon. pounds weight. DEME'ans. n. s. pl. properly demesnes. DEMI-CULVERIN Ordinary. A gun four An estate in lands; that which a man

inches four eighths diameter in the bore, possesses in his own right.

ten foot long. It carries a ball four TO DEMENTAȚE. v. n. [demento, Lat.]

inches two eighths diameter, and ten To make mad, or frantick.

pounds eleven ounces weight. DEMENTATION. n. so (dementatio, Lat.] DeMI-CULVERIN, elder Sort. A gun four Making mad, or frantick.

inches nd six eighths diameter in the DEME'RIT, n. s. (de mérite, Fr. from de.

bore, ten foot one third in length. It meritus, of demereor, Latin.]

carries a ball four inches four eighth 1. The opposite to merit ; ill-deserving ;

parts diameter, and twelve pounds eleven what makes one worthy of blame or

ounces weight.

Military Dict. punishment

They continue a perpetual volley of de They should not be able once to stir, or to culverins.

Rzheigh murmur, but it should be known, and they The army left two demi-culverins, and I shortened according to their demerits. Spenser. other good guns.

Clarenda. Thou liv'st by me, to me thy breath resign; DEMI-DEVÍL. 2. so (demi and dezal] Mine is the merit, the demerit thine. Dryden. Whatever they acquire by their industry or

Partaking of infernal nature ; half a ingenuity, should be secure, unless forfeited by

devil. any demerit or offence against the custom of the Will you, I pray, demand that demi-desil, family:

Temple.

Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body! 2. Anciently the same with merit; desert.

Sbakspeare. I'fetch my life and being

DEMI-GOD. n. s. [demi and god.] ParFrom men of royal siege; and my demerits taking of divine nature ; half a god ; an May speak, unbonnetting, to as proud a fortune As this that I have reach'd. Sbakspeare:

hero produced by the cohabitation of To DEME'RIT. v. a. (demeriter, Fr.) To

divinities with mortals. deserve blame or punishment.

He took his leave of them ; whose eyes bade

him farewell with tears, making temples to ben DEME'RSED. adj. [from demersus, of de

as to a demi-ged.

Sidan. mergo, Latin.] Plunged ; drowned. Be gods, or angels, demigods.

Dict. Transported demi-gids stood round; DEME'RSION. X.s. (demersio, Lat.]

And men grew heroes at the sound, 1. A drowning.

Enfam'd with glory's charms.

Pete

Nay, half in heav'n; except (w hat 's miginy 2. [In chymistry.) The putting any medi

odd) cine in a dissolving liquor. Dict. A fit of vapours clouds this demi-god. Pepee DEME'SNE. See DEMAIN.

DEMI-LANCE. n. s. (demi and lance.] A DE’MI. inseparable particle. [demi, Fr. light lance; a short spear; a half-pike.

dimidium, Latin.) Half; one of two On their steeld heads their dewi-lakses warz equal parts. This word is only used in Small pennons, which their ladies colours boré. composition: as demi.god; that is, half

Dydis

Light demi-lances from afar they throx, human, half divine.

Fasteu'd with leathern thongs, to gall the foe. DEMI-CANNON.N. s. demi and cannon.] DEMI-CANNON Lowest. A great gun that DEMI-MAN. 1. s. [demi and man.] Hálfa

carries a ball of thirty pounds weight man : a tern of reproach. and six inches diameter. The diameter We'must adventure this battle, lest ve perih of the bore is six inches two eighth parts.

by the complaints of this barking is..

Dict. DEMI-CANNON Ordinary. A great gun

DEMI-WOLF. 1. 3. [demi and wolf.] Haf six inches four eighths diameter in the

a wolf ; a mongrel dog between a dos bore, twelve foot long. It carries a shot

and wolf: iscisen.

Spaniels, curs, six inches one sixth diameter, and thirty

Showghs, water-rugs, and demi-selses, are two pounds weight.

Dict. cleped DĖMI-CANNON of the greatest Size. A All by the name of dogs. Sbakspeare's Ma*.

gun šix inches and six eighth parts dia- Demi'se. n. s. [from demetre, demis, a meter in the bore, twelve foot long. It : mise, Fr.] Death ; decease. It is so

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dom used but in formal and ceremoni. 2. Influenced by the devil ; produced by ous language.

diabolical possession. About a month before the demise of queen Demoniack phrensy, moping melancholy, Anne, the author retired.

Milton TO DEMI'SE. v. a. (demis, demise, Fr.] DEMO'NIACK. n. s. [from the adjective.}

To grant at one's death; to grant by One possessed by the devil; one whose will; to bequeath.

mind is disturbed and agitated by the My executors shall not have power to demise power of wicked and unclean spirits. my lands to be purchased. Suifi's Last Will. Those lunaticks and demoniacks that were reDEMI'SSION. n. s. [demissio, Lat.)

stored to their right mind, were such as sought Degradation ; diminution of dignity; after him, and believed in him.

Bentley. depression.

DEMO'NIAN. adj. [from demon.] Devilish; Inexorable rigour is worse than a lasche de of the nature of devils. mission of sovereign authority. L'Estrange Demonian spirits now, from the element TO DEMIÄT. v. a, (demitto, Lat.] To Each of his reign allotted; righulier call'd

Powers of fire, air, water.

Milton depress ; to hang down; to let fall.

Dict.

DEMONOCRACY. n. so [dvijews and x30.7i6.] When they are in their pride, that is, ad- The power of the devil.

Dict. vancing their train, if they decline their neck to DEMON O'LATRY. n.s. [fcipav and aétpel.com] the ground, they presently derit and let fall the The worship of the devil. Dict.

Brown's Vulgar Errours. DEMONO'LOGY. n. s. (drivews and aby) DEMO'CRACY. n. s. (impoxgropice.] One Discourse of the nature of devils. Thus

of the three forms of government ; that king James entitled his book concerning in which the sovereign power is neither witches. lodged in one man, nor in the nobles, but DEMO'NSTRABLE, adj. (demonstrabilis, in the collective body of the people. Lat.] That may be proyed beyond While many of the servants, by industry and

doubt or contradiction; that may be virtue, arrive at riches and esteem, then the nam ture of the government inclines to a democracy.

made not only probable but evident. Temple.

The grand articles of our belief are as demorThe majority, having the whole power of the

strable as geometry.

Glanville, community, may employ all that power in DEMO'NSTRABLY. adv. [from demonmaking laws, and executing those laws; and strable.] In such a manner as admits of there the form of the government is a perfect certain proof; evidently; beyond pos democracy.

Locke.

sibility of contradiction. DEMOCR A'TICAL. adj. [from democracy.] He should have compelled his ministers to

Pertaining to a popular government; execute the law, in cases that demonstrably conpopular.

cerned the publick peace.

Clarendon, They are still within the line of vulgarity, and TO DEMO’NSTRATE. v. a. [demonstro, are democraiical enemies to truth. Bromur.

Lat.] To prove with the highest degree As the government of England has a mixture of democratical in it, so the right is partly in the

of certainty; to prove in such a manner people.

Arbuthnot. as reduces the contrary position to evi. TO DEMO'LISH. v. a. [demolir, Fr. de- dent absurdity. molior, Lat.] To throw down buildings;

We cannot demonstrate these things so as to to raze; to destroy.

shew that the contrary often involves a contraI expected the fabrick of my book would long DEMONSTRA’TION. n. s. [demonstratio,

diction.

Tillotson. since have been demolished, and laid even with the ground.

Tillotson.

Latin.) Red lightning play'd along the firmament, 1. The highest degree of deducible or arAnd their demolish'd works to pieces rent. gumental evidence; the strongest de.

Dryden.

gree of proof; such proof as not only DEMO'LISHER.n. s. [from demolish.] One

evinces the position proved to be true, that throws down buildings; a destroy- but shows the contrary position to be er; a layer waste.

absurd and impossible. DEMOLI'TION. 11. s. [from demolish.] The

What appeareth to be true by strong and inact of overthrowing or demolishing vincible demonstration, such as wherein it is not buildings; destruction.

by any way possible to be deceived, thereunco Two gentlemen should have the direction in the mind doth necessarily yield. Hooker. the demolition of Dunkirk.

Swift, Where the agreement or disagreement of any DL'MON. n. s.' [da mon, Latin; daipur.] thing is plainly and clearly perceived, it is called A spirit, generally an evil spirit ;

demonstration.

Lorke. devil:

2. Indubitable evidence of the senses or I felt him strike, and now I see him fy: Curi'd demon! 0, for ever broken lie

Which way soever we turn ourselves, we are Thuse fatal shafts, by which I inward bleed!

encountered with clear evidences and sensible Prior. demonstrations of a Deity.

Tillotson. DEMONIACAL

DEMO'NSTRATIVE. adj. (demonstrativus, DEMO'NIACK. adj. [from demon.]

Latin.] 1. Belonging to the devil ; devilish. 1. Having the power of demonstration; He, all unarm'd,

invincibly conclusive ; certain. Shall chase thee with the terror of his voice

An argument necessary and demonstrative, is From thy demoniack holds, possession foul. Milt. such as, being proposed unto any man, and un

reason.

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derstood, the man cannot chuse but inwardly Certainly the highest and dearest concerns of yield.

Hooker. a temporal life are intinitely less valuable than De Having the power of expressing clearly

those of an eternal; and consequently ough, a certainly.

without any demur at all, to be sacrificed to them, Pain ing is necessary to all other arts; because

whensoever they come in competition with ther.

Soutb. of the need which they h. e of demonstrative syures, which citen remureigin to the un

All my demurs but double his actacks;

At lasi he whispers, Du, agd wedi gw silacks. derstanding than the ciearest discourses. Dryd. DEMONSTRATIVELY.adv. [from demon- DEMU'RE. adj. [des meurs, French.]

Pepe. strative.

I. Sober; decent. B. With evidence not to be opposed or

Lo! two most lovely virgins came in place; doutred.

With countenance demure, and modest grace. No man, in matters of this life, requires an

Spenset. 24surance either of the good which he designs, Come, pensive nun, devout and pure, e of the evil which he avoids, from arguments Sober, stedfast, and denture!

Multor. at 2:20nstratively certain.

South.

2. Grave; affectedly modest : it is now First, I demonstratively prove, That iet were only made to move. Prior.

generally taken in a sense of conIn Clearly; plainly, with certain know

tempt.

After a demure travel of regard, I tell them I ledge.

know my place, as I would they shouid do Demonstratively understanding the simplicity

theirs.

Sbakspeeri of perfection, it was not in the power of earth

There be many wise men, that have secret work them from it.

Brocus.

hearts and transparent countenances; yet this DEMONSTRA'TOR. 8. s. [from demon. would be done with a demure abasing of your strote.] One that proves ; one that eye sometimes.

Baron. teaches; one that demonstrates.

A cat lay, and looked so demure as if there had DEMONSTRA'TORY. adj. [from descon

been neither life nur soul in her. L'Estrang.

So cat, transform’d, sat gravely and derasre; strate.] Having the tendency to demon

Till mouse appear'd, and thought himself secure. strate.

Dryden. DEMU’LCENT. adj. [demulcens, Latin.] Jove sent and found, far in a country scene, Softening; mollifying; assuasive. Truth, innocence, good-nature, look serene; Pease, being deprived of any aromatick parts,

From which ingredients, first, the dextrous boy are mild and demulcent in the highest degree;

Pick'd the demure, the aukward, and the coy. Buit, being full of acrial particles, are fiatulent,

Swift. wien dissolved by digestion. Arbuthnot. TO DEMU'RE. v. n. (from the noun.]. TO DEMUR. V. n. [deineurer, French; To look with an affected modesty : not

dimorars, Italian; demorari, Latin.] used. 3. To delay a process in law by doubts Your wife Octavia, with her modest eyes and objections. See DEMURRER.

And still conclusion, shall acquire no honour, Ta this plea the plaintiff demurredo Walton

Demuring upon me.

Sbulspeare 2. To pause in uncertainty ; to suspend DEMU'RELY. adv. [from demure.] edetermination; to hesitate ; to delay

1. With affected modesty; solemnly; with the conclusion of an afiair.

pretended gravity. Upon this rub the English ambassadours

Put on a sober habit, rought fit to d-mur, and so sent into England to

Talk with respect, and swear but now and thea, æceive dircction from the lords of the council. Wear prayer-books in my pocket, look deeres. Hayward.

Shaéspeurt. Running into domards, they expect from us a

Esop's damse!, turned from a cat to a woman, sidderi resolution in things wherein the devil of sat very demurely at the board's end, till a mouse

Brorun. Dolphos would dear.

Bacon.

ran before her. He must be of a very sluggish or querulous

Next stood hypocrisy with holy leer, Eumour, that shall Jemur upon setting out, or

Soft smiling, and demurely looking down; di inand higher encouragements than the hope

But hid the dagger underneath ine gonn. of heaven. Decay of Pity.

Dryher. News of by death from rumoure receiv'd, 2. In the following line it is the same with And what he wish'd he easily believ'd;

solemnly.

Harburton. Bu long demurr'd, though from my hand he Hark, how the drums demurely wake the knew

sleepers !

Sbüksporto Flü'd, so loth he was to think it true. Dryden. DEMU'RE NESS. n. s. [from demure. 3. To doubt ; to have scruples or diincul- 1. Modesty ; soberness; gravity of aspect. ties; to deliberate.

Her eyes having in them such a cheerfulness, Fhere is something in our composition that as nature seemed to smile in them; though her thinks and apprehends, and revitcts and delitia mouth and cheeks obeyed to that pretty dware rates, determines and doubis, consents and ce- 165s, which the more one marked, the nare nios; that wills and demars, and resolves, and one would judge the poor scul ape to believe. chuses, and rejects. Bentley.

Sincey. TO DEMU'R. V. a. To doubt of.

2. Affected modesty ; pretended gravity. The latter I denar; for in their orks DEMU'RR AGE. n.s.[from demur.) An alMucii reason, and in their actions, oft appears. lowance made by merchants to masters

Weiton, DEMU'R. n. s. [from the verb.] Doubt;

cf ships, for their stay in a port beyond

the time appointed. besitation ; suspense of opinion. O progeny of Hear'ni, empyreal thrones!

DEMU'RRER. 1. s. [demeurer, French; Wizbi reusen hati. deep silence and denoir i. e. manere in aliquo loco, vcl mari. Stiż'd us, though uccisinay'd.

Alilton. A kind of pause upon a point of dir

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