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November 23.–The Agents of the two Governments attended and had a long conference with the Commissioners respecting the mode in which certain claims should be presented, and exchanged the evidence thereon.

November 24.-The Commissioners attended to transact the business of the Commission.

November 26.—The umpire had a long conference with the Commissioners on the subject of the general nature of the cases likely to be brought before the Commission.

November 28.–Further hearing was had on the claim of Messrs. Rogers and Co.

General Thomas, United States' Agent, offered affidavits on behalf of the owners of the barque “ Jones” that their vessel was not engaged in the Slave Trade, and, in addition, a statement of the amount of damage claimed.

He also presented an abstract of the claim of William Cook and others, avowing themselves to be the heirs of one Mrs. Frances Shard, and entitled to such property as she had died possessed of, and which, for want of representatives, it was alleged, had lapsed to the Crown, and was in the possession of Her Britannic Majesty's Government.

November 30.—The Commissioners met to-day, when Mr. Hornby expressed his doubts whether the claim of William Cook and others was within the jurisdiction of the Commission, and a long discussion was had thereon.

December 1.-Mr. Hannen, Agent of Her Majesty's Government, presented to the Commissioners the claim of Messrs. Kerford and Jenkin for losses sustained through a detention by The United States Army of merchandize forwarded by them to Mexico during the years 1846 and 1847.

December 2.—The Commission was occupied all day in going through the evidence in the case of Messrs. Kerford and Jenkin.

December 3.-Mr. Hannen presented the claim of William McGlinchy for the illegal seizure and detention of certain papers and property by the United States' Custom-house Officers on the River St. John.

December 5.-The Commissioners attended as usual at the office of the Commission.

December 6.-The claim of William Allen for the seizure and detention, at San Francisco, of the “ Joseph Albino,” by United States' Custom-house Officers, under charge of smuggling, and submitted to the Commissioners, and was disallowed.

The claim of Messrs. Loback and Co., for the seizure of logwood at Tabasco, by United States' Naval Officers, was also submitted to the Commissioners and was disallowed.

December 7.—Mr. Hannen presented the claim of Messrs. Calmont and Co., for the seizure of goods by Mexicans, while under convoy of United States' forces, which was disallowed.

A claim was then presented for the return of the duties paid on the goods seized, which was deferred for consideration.

December 10.—The Commissioners attended at the office, and examined into the evidence of the case of the “ Joseph Albino."

As also into that presented by Messrs. Loback and Co., and conferred on both of these cases.

December 12.—The Commissioners met to-day, and again discussed the evidence, and obtained further information from the agents respecting the claims.

December 13.-Several of the claimants attended before the Commissioners to ascertain when their claims coul i be heard. After some discussion, it was ordered that a full statement of each claim, and a résumé of the evidence by

which it was to be supported should be sent in to the Commissioners in the first instance.

December 14.—The Commissioners attended as usual for the general transaction of the business of the Commission.

December 15.—Mr. Hannen attended, and took exception to the jurisdiction of the Commissioners in the case of William Cook and others, and presented a protest against the same, which was ordered to be placed on file.

December 16.—The Commissioners conferred together on the claims submitted, and required further evidence to be put in.

December 17.-Mr. Clark, special agent of William Cook and others, attended before the Commissioners, and discussed at great length the question of jurisdiction raised by Mr. Hannen.

December 19.—Mr. Hannen and General Thomas argued at considerable length several points arising out of the words of the Convention relative to the jurisdiction conferred on the Commissioners. The Commissioners reserved their decision.

December 21.-The Commissioners decided to-day that claims which had been presented to either Government for its interposition with the other, whether the same had ever been presented to the notice of the other Government or not were within their jurisdiction.

December 22.–After conferring with several of the claimants the Commissioners adjourned until the 30th instant.

December 30.—Mr. Hannen presented the claim of Christopher Richardson for the seizure of the “ Frances and Eliza,” of New Orleans; and the claim of Messrs. McCalmont and Greaves for excess of duties levied on their goods at Vera Cruz.

1854.

January 3.-Mr. Hannen presented the claim of George Buckham for the seizure and sale of the brig “ Lady Shaw Stewart,” at San Francisco; for alleged violation of the Revenue Laws.

January 7.-Mr. Hannen presented the claim of Francis Watson and others for lands in the territory, formerly claimed by New Brunswick, but now, by adjustment of the boundary, situated in the State of Maine.

January 9.- Mr. Hannen presented the claim of Lord Cartaret to lands in North and South Carolina.

January 10.--Mr. Hannen presented the claim of the Earl of Dartmouth to lands in East Florida.

January 13.—Mr. Hannen presented the claim of John Potts for damages sustained in Chihuahua, in Mexico, from the American forces.

January 16.—Mr. Hannen presented the claim of the Messrs, Laurents for the seizure of property in Mexico by General Scott.

January 20.—Mr. Hannen presented the claim of John Lidgett for the alleged illegal seizure of the ship “ Albion" by the Custom-house authorities of the territory of Oregon.

January 24.-General Thomas presented the claim of Thomas Tyson, of Baltimore, for the seizure of the schooner “ Fidelity” at Sierra Leone by the collector of that port, in 1825.

January 27.-Mr. Hannen presented the claim of Thomas Rider to remuneration for losses and injury sustained by his arrest and detention at Matamoras by the military authorities of The United States.

February 9.-General Thomas presented the claim of the fishing schooner “ Caroline Knight " for its illegal seizure and sale at Prince Edward's Island by the officers of Her Majesty's Government.

February 17.-Mr. Hannen presented the claim of Messrs. Whitemill and Lyon for damage caused by their brigantine, the “ Confidence,” being run down in the Straits of Gibraltar by The United States' frigate of war “ Constitution,” in December 1850.

February 23.—General Thomas presented the affidavits of William Mayhew relative to the claim of Messrs. Rogers and Brothers, which were ordered to be placed on file.

Mr. Hannen presented the claim of William Patterson for injuries received from the United States' forces at Matamoras.

February 25.—The Commissioners had a long conference on the claim of the Messrs. Laurent.

February 27.-Further hearing was had relative to the claim of Messrs. Rogers and Brothers, which was submitted.

The claim of Thomas Rider was then argued by the agents, and after some discussion deferred for further consideration.

February 28.- The Commissioners discussed the claim of Messrs. Laurent, when Mr. Upham doubted whether the same was within the jurisdiction of the Commissioners, the Messrs. Laurent being domiciled in Mexico. Mr. Hornby combated this view, on the ground that domicile alone could not denationalize a subject or citizen of either country.

March 1.-A further long discussion was had on the case of the “ Frances and Eliza,” when Mr. Upham suggested that as, in his opinion, there was a probable ground of seizure, The United States' Government could not be held responsible for subsequent losses.

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