Page images
PDF
EPUB

The subject of the dependent clause is who; the predicate is refuses ; the

object is the complex infinitive phrase, to yield obedience to his parents. The subject and the predicate have no adjuncts; the principal part of the phrase is to yield, its adjunct is the object, obedience, which is mod. ified by the simple adjective phrase, to his parents ; the principal

part of this phrase is parents, and its adjunct is his. IF (Man is in the nominative case, after become, agreeing with youth ; according to Rule XXI.]

If you desire to be free from sin, avoid temptation.
By the faults of others, wise men learn how to correet their

own.

In reasoning, avoid blending arguments confusedly together that are of a separate nature.

He who refuses to learn how to avoid evil, may properly be decmed guilty of it.

IIe did not oppose his son's going to sea, because he desired to remove him from the evil influence of bad company.

Never expect to be able to govern others, unless you have learned how to govern yourself.

Ile who loves to survey the works of nature, can anticipate, wherever he may be, finding sources of the purest enjoyment. - He who attempts to please every body, will soon become an object of general indifference or contempt.

None but the virtuonis dare hope in bad circumstances.

If ever any author deserved to be called an original, it was Shakespeare.

EXERCISE III.—THE ATTRIBUTE PIIRASE.

EXAMPLE ANALYZED. “ The predominant passion of Franklin seems to have been the love of the useful." ANALYSIS.- This is a simple declarative sentence. The subject is passion; the predicate is seems ; the attribute is the infini

tive phrase, to have been the love of the useful. The adjuncts of the subject are the, predominant, and the simple adjective

phrase, of Franklin; the predicate has no adjuncts; the principal part of the attribute phrase is to have been, and its adjunct is the attribute love, which refers to the subject passion, and is modified by the, and the simple adjective phrase, of the useful.

[To have been is used as an adjective, and relates to passion.] The fire of our minds is immortal, and not to be quenched.

Universal benevolence and patriotic zeal appear to have been the motives of ab his actions.

Children should be permitted to be children, and not deprived of amusements proper for their age.

Was he not to live the best part of his life over again, and once more be all that he ever had been?

Criminals are observed to grow more anxious as their trial approaches.

Knowledge is not to be received inertly like the influences of the atmosphere, by a mere residence at the place of instruction.

The great purpose of poetry is to carry the mind above and beyond the beaten, dusty, weary walks of ordinary life ; to lift it into a purer element; and to breathe into it more profound and generous emotions.

He seems to have made an injudicious choice, though he is esteemed a sensible man.

Integrity is of the greatest importance in every situation of life.

To be useful in some degree, is within the means of every

To discover the true nature of comets, has hitherto proved beyond the power of science.

His conduct was, under the circumstances, in very bad taste. The merchant was to have sailed for Europe last week.

one.

EXERCISE IV.-THE ADJECTIVE PHRASE.

EXAMPLE ANALYZED.

“ Leáning my head upon my hand, I began to figuro to mye self the miseries of confinement." ANALYSIS.—This is a simple declarative sentence. The subject is I; the predicate is began; the object is the complex infin

itive phrase, to figure to myself the miseries of confinement. The principal part of the phrase is to figure, the adjuncts of which are the simple adverbial phrase, to myself, and the object miseries, which is

modified by the and the simple adjective phrase, of confinement. The adjunct of the subject is the complex adjective phrase leaning my head

upon my hand, the principal part of which is leaning, and its adjuncts, the object head modified by my, and the simple adverbial phrase, upon my hand, the principal part of which is hand, and its ad

junct, my. Life bears us on like the stream of a mighty river.

Augustus had no lawful authority to mako a change in the · Roman constitution.

A habit of sincerity in acknowledging faults, is a guard against committing them.

The atrocious crime of being a young man, I shall attempt neither to palliate nor deny.

Envy, surrounded on all sides by the brightness of another's prosperity, like the scorpion, confined within the circle of fire, stings itself to death.

The requisites for a first-rate actor demand a combination of talents and accomplishments, not casily to be found.

The conflicts of the world were not to take place altogether* on the tented field; but ideas, leaping from the world's awakened intellect, and burning all over with indestructible life, were to be marshalled against principalities and powers.

EXERCISE V.-THE ADVERBIAL PHRASE.

EXAMPLE ANALYZED.

“We live in the past by a knowledge of its history, and in the future by hope and anticipation." ANALYSIS.—This is a compound declarative sentence, abbreviated in form,

and consisting of the two coördinate clauses, We live in the past by a knowledge of its history, and (we live) in the future by hope and antici

pation, connected by and. The subject of either clause is we ; and the predicate is live. Neither of

the subjects is modified. The adjuncts of the first predicate are the
simple adverbial phrase,

in the past
, and the complex

adverbial phrase, by a knowledge of its history; the principal part is knowledge, and its adjuncts are a and the simple adjective phrase, of its history. [The adjuncts of the second predicate are of the same character, and may be

analyzed in the saine manner.} At that hour, O how vain was all sublunary happiness ! Abstain from injuring others, if you wish to be in safety.

The public are often deceived by false appearances and extravagant pretensions.

Day and night yield us contrary blessings; and, at the same time, assist each other, by giving fresh lustre to the delights of both.

Man's happiness or misery is, in a great measure, put into his own hands.

Has not sloth, or pride, or ill temper, or sinful passion, misled you from the path of sound and wise conduct ?

Man was created to search for truth, to love the beautiful, to desire the good, and to do the best.

Representation and taxation should always go hand in hand.

The statement which he made at first, he reiterated, again and again, without the least variation.

Jacob loved all his sons, but he loved Joseph the best.

We live in the past by a knowledge of its history, and in the future, by hope and anticipation.

* Altogether is here an adverb relating to the adverbial phrase, on the tented Rold. See Obs. 2, page 112.

EXERCISE VI.—THE EXPLANATORY PHRASE.

EXAMPLE ANALYZED.

“ It is useless to expatiate upon the beauties of nature to one who is blind." ANALY918.- This a complex declarative sentence. The principal clause is, It is useless to expatiate upon the beauties of nature

to one, and the dependent clause is, who is blind. The connective is

who. The subject of the principal clause is it; the predicate is is ; and the

attribute is useless. The adjunct of the subject is the complex explanatory phrase, to expatiate

upon the beauties of nature to one. The principal part of the phrase is to expatiate, the adjuncts of which are the complex adverbial phrase upon the beauties of nature, and the simple adverbial phrase to one. The principal part of the former is beauties, and its adjuncts are the and the simple adjective phrase of nature; the principal part of the latter

is one, and its adjunct is the dependent adjectiva clause who is blind. The subject of the dependent clause is who; the predicate, is ; and the

attribute, blind; each without adjuncts. It is always profitable to know our own faults and infirmities.

It is the characteristic of a pedant to make an idle display of his learning.

If what I say be not true, it is easy to convict me of falsehood.

It is very often impossible to estimate the extent of injury which a careless word will produce.

How happy had it been for him to have died in that sickness, when all Italy was putting up vows and prayers for his safety!

It is certainly in the power of a sensible and well-educated mother to inspire such tastes and propensities in her son as shall nearly decide the destiny of the future man.

It is impossible to read a page in Plato, Tully, or any of the other eminent moralists of antiquity, without being a greater and better man for it.

If we would improve our minds by conversation, it is a great happiness to be acquainted with persons wiser than ourselves.

If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest.

It is a miserable state of mind to have few things to desire, and many things to fear.

Death! Great proprietor of all ! 'tis thine

To tread out empire, and to quench the stars. Through worlds unnumber'd though the God be known, 'Tis ours to trace him only in our own.

EXERCISE VII.—THE INDEPENDENT PHRASE.

EXAMPLE ANALYZED.

“ This proposition being admitted, I now state my argument." ANALYSIS.—This is a simple declarative sentence.

The subject is 1; the predicate is state ; the object is argument.
The subject has no djuncts; the adjunct of the predicate is now; the

adjunct of the object is my. This proposition being admitted is an independent phrase; the principal

part is proposition, and its adjuncts are this and being admitted.

EXAMPLE II.

“One day, I was guilty of an action, which, to say the least, was in very bad taste.” ANALYSIS.—This is a complex declarative sentence. The principal clause is, One day I was guilty of an action; and the depend

ent clause is, which, to say the least, was in very bad taste. The con

nective is which. The subject of the principal clause is I; the predicate is was ; and the

attribute is guilty. The subject has no adjuncts; the adjunct of the predicate is the adverbial

phrase (prepositional in form), (on) one day ; the adjunct of the attribute is the adverbial phrase of an action. Of the latter phraso action is the principal part, and its adjuncts are an and the dependent

clause. The subject of the dependent clause is which; the predicate is was ; and

the attribute, the adjective phrase in very bad taste. Neither has any adjuncts; the principal part of the attribute phrase is

taste ; bad being its primary, and very its secondary adjunct. То

say the least is an independent phrase of the infinitive form. The prin

cipal part is to say, and its adjunct, the object least, modified by the. They being absent, we cannot come to a determination, There being much obscurity in the case, he refuses to decide

apon it.

To be plain with you, your conduct is very much to be censured.

Fathers ! Senators of Rome! the arbiters of nations ! to you I fly for refuge.

The baptism of John; was it from heaven, or of men ? Generally speaking, the life of all truly great men has been « life of intense and incessant labor.

To give one instance more, and then I will have lone with this rambling discourse.Hazlitt.

The great utility of knowledge and religion being thus apparent, it is highly incumbent upon us to pay a studious attention to them in our youth.

A shoe coming loose from the fore-foot of the thill-horse, at the beginning of the ascent of Mount Taurina, the postillion

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »