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SONNET.

ON FIRST LOOKING INTO CHAPMAN'S HOMER.

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UCH have I travelld in the realms of gold,

And mary goodly states and kingdoms

seen ;
Round many western islands have I been
Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold.
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told

That deep-brow'd Homer ruled as his demesne :

Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: Then felt I like some watcher of the skies,

When a new planet swims into his ken ; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes

He stared at the Pacific—and all his men Look'd at each other with a wild surmiseSilent, upon a peak in Darien.

KEATS.

THE APOLOGY.

THINK me not unkind or rude,

That I walk alone in grove and glen ; I go to the god of the wood,

To fetch his word to men.

TH

Tax not my sloth that I

Fold my arms beside the brook ; Each cloud that floated in the sky

Writes a letter in my book.

Chide me not, laborious band,

For the idle flowers I brought;
Every aster in

my

hand
Goes home loaded with a thought.

There was never mystery

But 'tis figured in the flowers,
Was never secret history,

But birds tell it in the bowers.

One harvest from thy field

Homeward brought the oxen strong ;
A second crop thine acres yield,
Which I gather in a song.

EMERSON.

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O

TIBBIE, I hae seen the day

Ye wadna been sae shy !
For laik o' gear ye lightly me ;-

But, trowth, I carena by!

Yestreen I met you on the moor,
Ye spak na, but gaed by like stoure;'
Ye geck at me because I'm poor;

But fient a hair care I.
Choru. O Tibbie, &c.

I doubtna, lass, but ye may think,
Because ye hae the name o'clink,

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That ye can please me at a wink,
Whene'er ye

like to try :

But sorrow tak him that's sae mean,
Although his pouch o' coin were clean,
Wha follows ony saucy quean

That looks sae proud and high!

Although a lad were ne'er sae smart,
If that he want the yellow dirt
Ye'll cast your head anither airt

And answer him fu' dry :

But if he hae the name o'

gear
Ye'll fasten to him like a brier,
Though hardly he, for sense or lear,

Be better than the kye.

But Tibbie, lass, tak my advice,
Your daddie's gear

maks
The deil a ane wad spier your price

Were ye as poor as I;

you sae nice;

There lives a lass in yonder park,
I wadna gie her in her sark
For thee wi' a' thy thousan' mark,

Ye needna look sae high !

Chorus. O Tibbie, I hae seen the day

Ye wadna been sae shy !
For laik o' gear ye lightly me;-
But, trowth, I carena by !

BURNS.

CHORAL SONG OF ILLYRIAN

PEASANTS.

[FROM“ ZAPOLYA.”]

U to the meadows trip away.

gay!

?! up! ye
dames, ye

lasses
To the meadows trip away.
'Tis you must tend the flocks this morn,
And scare the small birds from the corn.
Not a soul at home may stay:

For the shepherds must go

With lance and bow
To hunt the wolf in the woods to-day.

Leave the hearth and leave the house
To the cricket and the mouse :
Find grannam out a sunny seat,
With babe and lambkin at her feet.
Not a soul at home may stay:

For the shepherds must go

With lance and bow
To hunt the wolf in the woods to-day.

COLERIDGE.

THE RAVEN.

ON

NCE upon a midnight dreary, while I

ponder'd, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of for

gotten lore,

While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there

came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my

chamber door. 6. 'Tis some visitor," I mutter'd, “ tapping at my chamber door

Only this, and nothing more.”

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak

December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost

upon the floor. Eagerly I wish'd the morrow;-vainly I had

sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow.-sorrow for

the lost LenoreFor the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore

Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each

purple curtain Thrill'd me fill'd me with fantastic terrors never

felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I

stood repeating “ 'Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my

chamber doorSome late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door ;

This it is, and nothing more.”

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then

no longer, “ Sir," said I, " or Madam, truly your forgiveness

I implore ;

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