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SECTION FOURTH.-Seminole war, history of conduct of Gen. Jack-

son in-supported by President and cabinet massacre of Indians
reprobated by Mr. Clay-Arbuthnot and Ambrister-Gen. Jack-
son's conduct towards them--Mr. Clay's remarks thereon-also
on outrages committed on Spanish authorities-close of Mr. C.'s
speech-intercourse between Gen. Jackson and Mr. Clay broken
off.

p. 162.

SECTION FIFTH.-American System—the part taken in the estab-

lishment of the system by Mr. Clay in 1815–16—also in 1819-20
-his views of the system-opposed by Mr. Webster-grounds of
Mr. Clay's argument-objections to the system-objections by
Mr. Barbour-success of the system,

p. 179.

SECTION Sixth._Proposal to admit Missouri--condition proposed

difficulties—Mr. Clay's views-conditions discussed, 1818–19–
result unfortunate discussion renewed, 1819-20-speech of Mr.
Clay-termination of dispute-Missouri constitution-discussion
renewed at session of Congress, 1820-21-Mr. Clay absent,
course pursued by him on his arrival-appointment of committee
of thirteen-their report-rejected-another committee appointed
at the suggestion of Mr. Clay—their report accepted—issue of
the question-conduct of Mr. Randolph.

p. 195.

Section SEVENTH. Mr. Clay in his retirement from Congress ap-

pointed a commissioner to adjust certain land claims-attends the
sittings of Virginia legislature-obtaints a hearing before that body
-amusing incident—success of Missouri—Mr. Clay reappointed
to Congress-chosen speaker-Greek revolution—Mr. Webster
presents a resolution for recognition of independence of Greece
supported by Mr. Clay-his speech—hiş labours during the session
of Congress.

p. 216.

SECTION EIGHTH.-Presidential canvass for 1825 candidates-Mr.

Clay nominated—his loss of the votes of Louisiana-candidates
returned to the house-Mr. Clay caressed_his reserve-pre-
ference for Mr. Adams-Letter on his conduct by Mr. Kremer-
course pursued by Mr. Clay-requests an investigation of his
conduct-course pursued by Mr. Kremer—Mr. K. refuses to
substantiate the charges of bargain and corruption-state of the
electoral vote-instructions of Kentucky legislature—Mr. Craw-
ford, the state of his health-Mr. Clay compelled to choose be

tween Jackson and Adams--reasons for not preferring Jackson-
reasons for preferring Adams—the day of election in the House
Mr. Clay chosen secretary-attacks on Mr. Clay for his vote-
by General Jackson-Mr. Clay's defence—result. p. 228

223.

p. 240.

PART FOURTH.
Section First.—Mr. Adams, as President, calumniated-general re-

marks-labours of the office of Secretary of State-Mr. Clay
enters upon the duties of the office discharges them with ability
-testimonial of Mr. Adams and of Mr. Rush-Mr. Clay's inter-
course with foreign ministers-number of treaties concluded by
him--principle involved in them-West India trade-history of
the negotiation for that trade-difficulties with England, in rela-
tion to the trade-prohibition of intercourse with the West India
Islands—proposal by Messrs. Adams and Clay-Mr. C.'s reproof

of the conduct of Mr. Raguet.
Section Second.—New administration-general remarks—Mr. Ad-

ams an unpopular man--his patriotism-Mr. Clay shared that
unpopularity for a time-Mr. Clay returns to the west-his recep-
tion-Mr. Clay offered a seat in Congress-refuses-invited to visit
his fellow citizens-general remarks--Mr. Clay at Lexington-his
speech—his views of government–conclusion of his speech-his
views of the administration-general remarks-Mr. Clay visits
New-Orleans-speech at Natchez—description of-visits Colum-
bus—speech at Cincinnati-address before Colonization Society
-general remarks-history of Mr. Clay connected with his

country's.
Conclusion.—Mr. Clay—his personal appearance-his oratorical
powers—his voice-his manner--

r-general character of his mind-
his character in private—his hospitality-concluding remarks. 272.
APPENDIX.—Mr. Clay's letter to Jonathan Russel-Mr. Clay one of

the committee to inform the President of the acknowledgement of
the Independence of South America—Anecdote Mr. Clay's ap-
peal to the House- Testimonial of his constituents in 1828-Mr.
Clay's letter to James Brooke-Mr. Adams's letter to citizens of
New-Jersey.

p. 254.

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