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running thence along the extreme height of the said mountain to the place where Watauga River breaks through it; thence a direct course to the top of the Yellow Mountain, where Bright's road crosses the same; thence along the ridge of said mountain between the waters of Doe River and the waters of Rock Creek, to the place where the road crosses the Iron Mountain; from thence along the extreme height of said mountain to where Nolichucky River runs through the same; thence to the top of the Bald Mountain; thence along the extreme height of said mountain to the Painted Rock on French Broad River; thence along the highest ridge of said mountain to the place where it is called the Great Iron or Smoky Mountain; thence along the extreme height of said mountain to the place where it is called Unicoi or Unaka Mountain between the Indian towns of Cowee and Old Chota; thence along the main ridge of the said mountain to the southern bounday of this State as described in the act of cession of North Carolina to the United States of America.

In 1879 the legislature passed an act to appoint commissioners to make a survey from the northeast corner of Georgia westward. This point of commencement is common to North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.

In 1881 the legislature passed another act providing for the appointnient of a commissioner, who should act with commissioners from Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, or Tennessee to re-run and re-mark the boundaries between North Carolina and the other States.

SOUTH CAROLINA.

The territory included in the present State of South Carolina was included in the charter of Carolina, which also embraced what is now the State of Georgia. (Vide North Carolina, p. 99.)

In 1729 the province of Carolina was divided, forming the two provinces of North Carolina and South Carolina. In 1732 the extent of South Carolina was reduced by the charter of Georgia. (Vide Georgia, p. 104.)

(For a history of the settlement of the boundary between North Carolina and South Carolina, vide North Carolina, p. 99.)

By the charter of Georgia the line between South Carolina and Georgia was to be the Savannah River, to the head thereof. In 1762 difficulties having arisen concerning the interpretation of the charter, as regarded the head of the Savannah, and also the title to the lands south of the Altamaha River, Georgia made complaint to the King, who issued a proclamation in 1763 giving the lands between the Altamaha and Saint Mary's rivers to Georgia. The question of the boundary on the Savannah, however, remained unsettled until 1787, when a convention between the two States was held at Beaufort, S. C., to determine the same, and the line was fixed as at present.

The following is an extract from the articles of agreement:

The most northern branch or stream of the river Savannah from the sea or mouth of such stream to the fork or confluence of the rivers now called Tugaloo and Keowa, and from thence the most northern branch or stream of the said river Tugaloo till it intersects the northern boundary line of South Carolina, if the said branch or stream

of Tugaloo extends so far north, reserving all the islands in the said rivers Savannah and Tugaloo to Georgia; but if the head spring or source of any branch or stream of the said river Tugaloo does not extend to the north boundary line of South Carolina, then a west line to the Mississippi, to be drawn from the head spring or source of the said branch or stream of Tugaloo River which extends to the highest northern latitude, shall forever hereafter form the separation, limit, and boundary between the States of South Carolina and Georgia. (Laws of the United States, Vol. I, p. 466.)

In the same year South Carolina ceded to the United States a narrow strip of territory south of the North Carolina line, which she claimed, about 12 or 14 miles wide, and extending to the Mississippi River; this strip now forms the northern portion of Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. Georgia being thus increased in extent northwardly, the line between the two States is clearly expressed in the code of South Carolina, as follows, viz:

The Savannah River, from its entrance into the ocean to the confluence of the Tugaloo and Keowa rivers; thence by the Tugaloo River to the confluence of the Tugaloo and Chatooga rivers; thence by the Chatooga River to the North Carolina line in the thirty-fifth degree of north latitude, the line being low-water mark at the southern shore of the most northern stream of said rivers, where the middle of the rivers is broken by islands, and middle thread of the stream where the rivers flow in one stream or volume.

GEORGIA.

Georgia was included in the proprietary charter granted to the lords proprietors of Carolina in 1663 and 1665, for which a provincial charter was substituted in 1719.

In 1732 the charter of Georgia as an independent colony was granted by King George II, of which the following is an extract:

All those lands, countrys, and territories situate, lying and being in that part of South Carolina, in America, which lies from the most northern part of a stream or river there, commonly called the Savannah, all along the sea-coast to the southward, unto the nuost southern stream of a certain other great water. or river called the Altamaha, and westerly from the heads of the said rivers, respectively, in direct lines to the south seas.

This charter was surrendered in 1752 and a provincial government established. (C. & C., p. 369 et seq.)

In 1763 the territory between the Altamaha and Saint Mary's rivers was added to Georgia by royal proclamation. (Vide South Carolina, p. 103.)

In the constitution adopted by Georgia in 1798 the boundaries are declared. The following is an extract therefrom:

The limits, boundaries, jurisdictions, and authority of the State of Georgia do, and did, and of right ought to extend from the sea or mouth of the river Savannah along the northern branch or stream thereof, to the fork or confluence of the rivers now called Tugalo and Keowee, and from thence along the most northern branch or stream of the said river Tugalo, till it intersect the northern boundary line of South Carolina, if the said branch or stream of Tugalo extends so far north, reserving all the

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