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The following is an abstract of the engineer's report of the line run under direction of the commissioners from New York, the Connecticut commissioners declining to be present or assist, viz: - Beginning at the northwest corner of Connecticut, at the monument erected by the commissioners of New York and Connecticut in 1731, latitude. 42° 02' 58".54, longitude 73° 30'06".66; thence south 11° 20' west, 464 chains, to the a 47th mile monument; thence south 12° 34' west, 239 chains 57 links, to the 44th mile monument point; thence south 11° 33' west, 160 chains, 99 links, to the 42d mile monument; thence south 13° 16' west, 161 chains 24 links, to the 40th mile monument point; thence south 12° 21' west, 398 chains 21 links, to the 35th mile monument; thence south 12° 32' west, 158 chains 96 links, to the 33d mile monument; thence south 11° 44' west, 243 chains 37 links, to the 30th mile monument; thence south 12° 27' west, 161 chains 32 links, to the 28th mile monument; thence south 10° 56' west, 160 chains, to the 26th mile monument point; thence south 11° 39' west, 320 chains 11 links, to the 22d mile monument; thence south 12° 18' west, 163 chains 17 links, to the 20th mile monument; thence south 11° 49' west, 159 chains 9 links, to the 18th mile monument; thence south 12° 19' west, 157 chains 15 links, to the 16th mile monument; thence south 10° 11' west, 161 chains 7 links, to the 14th mile monument; thence south 10° 51' west, 313 chains 41 links, to the 10th mile monument point; thence south 12° 24' west, 155 chains 71. links, to the 8th mile monument; thence south 10° 19' west, 159 chains 28 links, to the 6th mile monument point; thence south 12° 10' west, 164 chains 42 links, to the 4th mile monument; thence south 11° 44' west, 158 chains 99 links, to the 2-mile monument; thence south 14° 10' west, 109 chains 41 links, to the Ridgefield angle monument; thence south 25° 8' east, 213 chains 39 links, to the 4th mile monument on the east line of the oblong between the Wilton and Ridgefield angles; thence south 24° 48' east, 157 chains 63 links, to the 2-mile monument; thence south 24° 14' east, 167 chains 28 links, to the Wilton angle monument, or southeast corner of the oblong as set off by the com missioners of 1731; thence south 67° 45' west, 138 chains 76 links, to the southwest corner of the oblong, and being where the survey of 1725 terminated; thence south 65° 44' west, 90 chains 87 links, to a point considered the original 12th mile monument point; thence south 66° 56' west, 241 chains 93 links, to a point called the 9th mile monument; thence south 66° 45' west, 319 chains 12 links, to the 5th mile monument point; thence south 66° 25' west, 398 chains 40 links, to the angle at the Duke's Trees; thence south 23° 38' east, 172 chains 93 links, to a point which is west-southwest and distant 32 rods from the chimney in the old Clapp house; thence south 24° 21' east, 224 chains 78 links, to a point opposite the old William Anderson house; thence south 24° 19' east, 173 chains 7 links, to the great stone at the ancient wading place on Byram River; thence south 17° 45' west, 12 chains 60 links, to a rock in the river which can be seen at low tide, in which there is a bolt; thence south 27° west, 55 chains 19 links; thence south 7° 20' east, 13 chains 45 links; thence south 12° 10' east, 16 chains 13 links; thence south, 2° 40' east, 9 chains 4 links; thence south 28° 25' east, 9 chains 54 links; thence south 18° 40' east, 4 chains 77 links thence south 11° 55' west, 6 chains 33 links; thence south 58° 10' west, to where it falls into the sound. (See report of the commissioners to ascertain and settle the boundary line between the States of New York and Connecticut, February 8, 1861, in which will also be found a complete account of this controversy.)

a The mile monuments referred to are those, at that time remaining, which were established by the Connecticut and New York commissioners of 1731.

b The entire distance from the Massachusetts line to Ridgefield angle is 52 miles 35 rods, a difference of only 5 rods from the survey of 1731.

In 1880 commissioners were appointed by Connecticut and New York. Their report was ratified in 1880.

These commissioners reported as follows, viz: We agree that the boundary on the land constituting the western boundary of Connecticut and the eastern boundary of New York shall be and is as the same was defined by monuments erected by commissioners appointed by the State of New York, and completed in the year 1860, the said boundary line extending from Byram Point, formerly called Lyon's Point, on the south, to the line of the State of Massachusetts on the north.

And we further agree that the boundary on the sound shall be and is as follows:

Beginning at a point in the center of the channel, about 600 feet south of the extreme rocks of Byram Point, marked No. 0, on appended United States Coast Survey chart; thence running in a true southeast course 34 statute miles; thence in a straight line (the arc of a great circle) northeasterly to a point 4 statute miles due south of New London Light-House; thence northeasterly to a point marked No. 1, on the annexed United States Coast Survey chart of Fisher's Island Sound, which point is on the longitude east three-quarters north, sailing course down on said map, and is about 1,000 feet northerly from the Hommock or North Dumpling LightHouse; thence following said east three-fourths north sailing course as laid down on said map easterly to a point marked No. 2 on said map; thence southeasterly to a point marked No. 3 on said map; so far as said States are coterminous. (See Revised Statutes of New York, 1881, Vol. I, page 136.)

The above agreement concerning these boundaries between Connecticut and New York was confirmed by the Congress of the United States on February 26, 1881. (See Revised Statutes of United States, 1881.)

(For the history and present location of the eastern boundary of Connecticut, vide Massachusetts, p. 61, and Rhode Island, p. 71. For the northern boundary, vide Massachusetts, p. 65.)

Under the charter of 1662 Connecticut claimed a large western territory. Subsequent to the Revolution, however, in 1786, 1792, 1795, and 1800, she relinquished all title to any land west of her present boundary.

NEW YORK.

The territory included in the present State of New York was embraced in the French and English grants of 1603 and 1606. The Dutch, however, in 1613 established trading posts on the Hudson River and claimed jurisdiction over the territory between the Connecticut and Delaware rivers, which they called New Netherlands. The government was vested in "The United New Netherland Company," chartered in 1616, and then in “The Dutch West India Company,” chartered in 1621.

In 1664 King Charles II of England granted to his brother, the Duke of York, a large territory in America, which included, with other lands, all that tract lying between the west bank of the Connecticut River and the east bank of the Delaware. The Duke of York had previously purchased, in 1663, the grant of Long Island and other islands on the New England coast, made in 1635 to the Earl of Stirling, and in 1664, with an armed fleet, he took possession of New Amsterdam, which was thenceforth called New York. This conquest was confirmed by the treaty of Breda in 1667.

The following is an extract from the grant of 1664 to the Duke of York:

All that parte of the maine land of New England beginning at a certaine place called or knowne by the name of St. Croix next adjoyning to New Scotland in America and from thence extending along the sea coast unto a certain place called Petuaquine or Pemaquid and so up the River thereof to the further head of ye same as it tendeth northwards and extending from thence to the River Kinebequi and so upwards by the shortest course to the River Canada northward and also all that Island or Islands commonly called by the severall name or names of Matowacks or Long Island scituate lying and being towards the west of Cape Codd and ye narrow Higansetts abutting upon the maine land between the two Rivers there called or knowne by the severall names of Conecticutt and Hudsons River togather also with the said river of Hudsons River and all the land from the west side of Conecticutt to ye east side of Delaware Bay and also all those severall Islands called, or knowne by the names of Martin's Vinyard and Nantukes otherwise Nantuckett togather with all ye lands islands soyles harbours mines minerals quarryes woods marshes waters lakes ffishings hawking hunting and ffowling and all other royalltyes proffitts commodityes and hereditaments to the said severale island lands and premisses belonging and appertaining with theire and every of theire appurtenances and all our estate right title interest benefitt advantage claime and demand of in or to the said lands and premises or any part or parcell thereof and the revercon and revercons remainder and remainders togather with the yearly and other ye rents revenues and proffitts of all and singular the said premisses and of every part and parcell thereof to have and to hold all and singular the said lands islands hereditaments and premisses with their and every of their appurtenances.

In July, 1673, the Dutch recaptured New York and held it until it was restored to the English by the treaty of Westminster, in February,

The Duke of York thereupon, to perfect his title, obtained a new

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