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ships, that had already engaged, and tacked in succession, standing to the south east, on the larboard tack, towards Dominica, which is seen in perspective. In shore is the numerous convoy of the French, keeping to windward, in order to effect their escape to Guadaloupe.

Lieutenant J. Matthews *, in his valuable explanations of different actions in the West Indies during the last war, says :-"By seven, part of the van division had got the sea breeze, and stretched on to the northward, forming the line, but the centre, and rear were still becalmed, and a considerable distance astern; in the mean time several of the enemy had cleared the island, by favour of light airs off the land, and were forming their line on the starboard tack; about half past nine, the enemy finding our centre, and rear, mostly becalmed and sepa. rated, bore down to attack the Van. Forty five minutes past nine, the signal was made to engage, and three minutes after, the action began with the Alfred, then the headmost ship, and about the centre of the enemy. Soon after the British Van brought to, to prevent a greater separation from the centre, and rear ; and the French engaging under sail, tacked, when they had passed the headmost ship, and formed again in the rear. In the mean time, the British centre had, by favour of a partial breeze from the northward, got much nearer in shore, and about eleven the sea breeze reached them, when they immediately tacked, and stood to the northward to join the Van; and the enemy hauled their wind close, ceased firing, and tacked to the southward to join the rear, and prevent the British centre, from getsing to windward of them. About half past eleven the enemy veered, and again formed their line on the starboard tack, and our centre brought their rear to distant action, which ceased at noon, and commenced again in the Van, in the same manner as before: the Van continued to be very hotly pressed till tifteen minutes pat one, when the French, finding the whole of the British line coming up, hauled their wind close and tacked in succession. Before two, the signal for action was hauled down, the enemy shewing no wish to renew it, but carrying all the sail they possibly could to keep to windward, and their convoy, under escort of two fifty gun ships, were out of sight early in the afternoon; the British Fleet kept plying to windward all this day.”

* Twenty-one plans with explanations of different actions in the West Indies during the late war, (1784.) Chester. Printed for J. Fletcher. Dedicated to Lord Hood.

NAVAL ANECDOTES,
COMMERCIAL HINTS, RECOLLECTIONS, &c.

NANTES IN GURGITE VASTO!

20. V. Comte De Grasse's Fleet, from his sailing from Brest, 1781-1782. FIVE NIVE ships of the line went with M. de Suffrein for the East

Indies. The Comte de Grasse arrived within sight of Martinique, April 28th, having had an extraordinary quick passage.

ITO

74

César

Sbips.
Guns.

Commanders
Ville de Paris

IS Lieut. Gen. Comte de Grasse

2 Capt. de Cezaire Auguste

80 De Bougainville, Commodore St. Esprit

80 Mar, de Chabert Languedoc

80 Baron D'Arras Pluton

74

D'Albert de Rious
Bourgogne

74 Chev. de Charité
Souverain

74 Chev. de Glandeves
Glorieux

Viscomte d'Escars
Citoyen

74 M. D'Ettry

74 Coriolis D’Espinouse Sceptre

74 C. de Vandreuil Magnanime

74 Comte Le Beque Hercule

74

Viscomte de Turpin
Northumberland 74

Dc Brigueville
Diadéme

74

C. de Monteclerc
Marseillois

74

Castellane Mejastre
Zelé

74 Chev. de Preville
Hector

74 Renaud d'Allayne
Scipion

Chev, de Clavieres
Valliant

64

M. de Cony
Saggitaire

54 Perouze de Galaupe
With the above fleet he engaged Sir Samuel Hood on the 29th of
April ; during the engagement the following five ships stood out of
Fort Royal Bay, and joined him :
Ships.
Guns.

Commanders.
Victoire

74

Chev. St Hypollite
Caton

64

M. de Framond
Solitaire

C. de Cice Champion
Reflechi

64

Cillart de Surville
Experiment

so Marteilly Chantard Sir Samuel Hood had only eighteen sail of the line against twentysix, and was to leeward of the port, therefore he could not prevent Comte de Grasse from carrying his large convoy safe into Fort Royal Harbour; who after this took Tobago, and, then sailing for Cape François, arrived there the 16th of July, and joined the-

74

64

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Sbies.

Guns.

Commanders,
Palmier

Commodore Chev. de Monteil

74 { Destin

74

Dunaitz de Goimpy
Intrepide

74 Du Plessis Parscault
Adionnaire

64 De L'Archanzel Triton

64 Brun Le Boades On this junction the Chev, de Monteil hoisted his flag on board the Languedoc.

64

90

LORD Hood's LINE OF BATTLE on the 29th of April 1781,

RED DIVISION,

led led on the starboard tack,
Sbips.
Guns.

Commanders.
2. Alfred

74 Captain Bayne 2. Belliqueux

64

Brine 3. Prince William

Douglas 4. Alcide

74

Thompson
So Invincible

74

Bickerton 6. Monarch

74

Reynolds

Rear Admiral ir S. Hood, Bart, 7. Barfleur

Commander in chief

Captain Knight 8. Terrible

74

Ferguson 9 Princessa

70

Sir Thomas Rich, Bart,
BLUE DIVISION.

Blue led on the larboard tack,
Sbips.
Guns.

Commanders.
10. Ajax

74 Captain Symonds * 11. Resolution

74 Lord Robert Manners 12. Montague 74 Captain Houlton

Francis Samuel Drake, Rear Ad. 13. Gibraltar

miral of the Blue

Captain Knatchbull 14. Centaur

74

Nott 15. Russell

74

Sutherland 16. Torbay

74

Gedoin 17. Intrepid

64

Molloy 18. Shrewsbury 74

Robinson

LINE OF BATTLE on the 25th of January 1782, going into Basseterre,

VAN DIVISION.
Ships.
Guns.

Commanders.
St. Albans

64 Captain Inglis
Alcide

74

c. Thompson Intrepid

64

Molloy
Torbay

74

Gedoin
Princessa

70 { Drake

2 Captain Knatchbull
Prince George

Williams
Ajax

74

Charrington * This gentleman, we believe, was brother to the fresca: learned professor of Modern History in the University of Cambridge.

Wol. II.

96

Ships:

West

90

74

CENTRE DIVISION.
Guns.

Commanders.
Prince William 64

Captain Wilkinson Shrewsbury

74 Invincible

74

Saxton Barfleur

$ Rear Admiral Sir S. Hood, Basta

Captain Knight Monarch

74

Reynolds Belliqueux

64

Sutherland Centaur

74

Inglefield Alfred

74

Bayne

REAR DIVISION. Russell

Captain Stanhope Resolution

74 Lord Robert Manners Bedford

Commodore Afleck 74

Captain Graves Canada

74

Hon. William Cornwallis Prudent

64 Captain Barclay Montagu

74

Bowen America

64

***

S. Thompson LINE as they lay ai Anchor of Basseterre, and were attacked on the

26th of January 1782. 1. Bedford

12. Prince William 2. Russell

13. Shrewsbury 3. Montague

Invincible 4. St. Alban's

15. Barfleuri

16. Monarch 6. Ainerica

17. Centaur 7. Intrepid

18. Belliqueux 8. Torbay

19. Resolution 9. Princessa

20. Prudent 119. Prince George

21. Canada 11. 1jax

22. Alfred

14.

5. Alcide

TO THE EDITOR OF THE NAVAL CHRONICLE. MR. FDITOR, AS you request information and hints from professional men, I send you the following extract from the letter of an oficer of rank:

" The late Captain Sir William Burnaby gave a Dutch Compass to Mr. Ramsden, the optician, which I saw about a year ago. This compass was of great weight, and would either stand in a ship, or even a boat, in an heavy sea. Whether Mr. Ramsden obtained a patent for it, or not, I cannot tell; but last war he made a great many very light compasses, after the plan of the Dutch compass, and most of the ships of the navy were supplied with them. These would not stand either in a boat, or a ship, and being useless were exploded. It was said his light compass would stand on an horse's back at full gallop. When Mr. Ramsden proposed making these light compasses, I recommended his making them like the Dutch compass, the card excepted : for as it answered in every respect, an

improvement was unnecessary. Every ship in the navy ought to be supplied with one of these Dutch compasses ; they are the best I ever met with. An account of this compass in the Naval Chronicle might draw attention towards it ; you are therefore at liberty to send this to the Editor. It is of great consequence to the service to have compasses which will stand in boats in blowing weather. A captain of a Dutch man of war gave this compass to Sir William Burnaby, when he commanded the Zephyr sloop in the Downs; and Sir William shewed it me at Jamaica in the year 1772. It is therefore an old acquaintance."

Yours, &c.

L.

The Chunam used in the East Indies to cover the bottoms of ships is found to be superior to copper sheathing, as it secures the bottom from all injury, and will last twelve years at least.

Many of the most valuable products of the eastern climes might be successfully cultivated in our West India islands. It has been proved by experience that the cinnamon tree will thrive there as well as in its pative soil; and there is no doubt but that nutmegs, cloves, and other spices, would also flourish in the tropical regions of the west. The Society for the Encouragement of Arts is making this a subject of its particular attention,

TO THE EDITOR OF THE NAVAL CHRONICLE, MR. EDITOR, IF you are in want of any interesting naval intelligence, you need only look into the Liverpool papers during the present war, where you will find the relation of many a brave action performed by men, the greater part of whom were never at sea before: witness what has been done by the Thomas, James, Tyson, Betsy and Susan, Agreeable, Barton, Cicero, Benson, Astrea, Cottrell, Lovely Lass, Battalion, Henry, Scipio, Mary, Wilding, Nereus, Brooks, Elizabeth, Swallow, Indian Trader, &c.

I am, Sir,
Your obedient humble servant,

C. W. E. P.

A Correspondent wishes to know whether it would not be a desira. ble plan, instead of breaking up our old ships, to send them off Brest, and sink them in the Passage du Raz, which thus would soon be choked up as an outlet for the French fleet, through which they have often eluded the vigilance of our cruisers, and put to sea.

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