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4. Militia Fobce Of The United States. Abstract of the United States Militia, from the Army Register for 1846.

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VH. POST-OFFICE ESTABLISHMENT.
1. Post-Office Statistics for the year ending June 30, 1845,

Number of Post-Offices supplied, . . . 14,183

Increase of Mail Transportation over last year, . 224,645

Receipts for the year, . . . $4,289,841 80

Expenditures for the year, . . 4,320,731 99 The net revenue, deducting the commissions of Postmasters

and incidental expenses, was . . 2,942,217 2"

The pay of Postmasters for the year was . 1,409,87518

The Maguetic Telegraph between Baltimore and Washington has cost, between the 1st of April and the 1st of October, 1845, $3,244 99, and the receipts have been $413 44.

Of 67 railroad contracts in New England and New York, only 35 have been adjudged in consequence of exorbitant demands. The railroad service performed is one tenth part of the whole; the pay they receive one fifth part.

In 1838, the weight of the mails for one week in the cities of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and Richmond, was tested, and the whole weight amounted to ... 55,641 pounds.

The newspapers weighed . . 44,868"

The periodicals weighed, . . . 8,857"

The letters, free and taxable, weighed . 1,916"

At present, it is believed, the printed matter is nine tenths of the weight conveyed, and it pays only one tenth of the expense.

2. Table of Mail Sereice for the year preceding the 1st of July, 1845.

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• Also, expenses of Mail Agencies, $37,513; making in all $2,905,504.

3. Number of Post-Offices, Ertent of Post-Roads, and Revenue and Erpenditures of the Post-Office Department; with the Amount paid to Postmasters and for Transportation of the Mail.

Amount paid for

yo. of |*...* | * *|†—T-ear. Offices. Roads. Department. Department. *::::: o

Miles. Dollars. Dollars. Dollars. Dollars. 1790 75 1,875 37,935 32,140 8,198 22,081 1795 453 13,207 160,620 117,893 30,272 75,359 1800 903 20,817 280,804 213,994 69,243 128,644 1805 -1,558 31,076 421,373 377,367 111,552 239,635 1810 2,300 36,406 551,684 495,969 149,438 .327,966 1815 3,000 43,748 1,043,065 748,121 241,901 487,779 1816 3,260 || 48,673 961,782 804,422 265,944 521,970 1817 3,459 52,089 1,002,973 916,515 303,916 589,159 1818 3,618 59,473 1,130,235 1,035,832 346,429 664,611 1819 4,000 67,586 1,204,737 1,117,861 375,828 717,881 1820 4,500 | 72,492 | 1,111,927 1,160,926 352,295 782,425 1821 4,650 78,80s 1,059,087 1,184,283 387,599 815,681 1822 4,799 82,763 1,117,490 1,167,572 355,299 788,618 1823 4,043 84,860 1,130,115 1,156,995 360,462 767,464 1824 5,132 84,860 1,197,758 1,188,019 383,804 768,939 1825 5,677 94,052 1,306,525 1,229,043 411,183 785,646 1826 6,150 94,052 1,447,703 1,366,712 447,727 SS5,100 1827 7,003 105,336 1,524,633 1,468,959 486,411 942,345 1828 7,530 105,336 1,659,915 1,689,945 548,049 1,086,313 1829 8,004 115,000 1,707,418 1,782,132 559,237 1,153,646 1830 8,450 115,176 1,850,583 1,932,708 595,234 1,274,000 1831 8,686 115,486 1,997,811 1,936,122 635,023 1,252,226 1832 9,205 104,466 2,258,570 2,266,171 715,481 1,482,507 1833 10,127 119,916 2,617,011 2,930,414 826,283 1,894,638 1834 10,693 119,916 2,823,749 2,910,605 897,317 1,925,544 1835 10,770 112,774 2,993,356 2,757,350 945,418 1,719,007 1836 11,091 118,264 3,408,323 2,841,766 812,803 1,638,052 1837 11,767 141,242 4,100,605 3,303,428 891,352 1,996,727 1838 12,519 || 134,818 4,235,078 4,621,833 933,948 3,131,308 1839 12,780 133,999 4,477,614 4,654,718 980,000 3,285,622 1840 13,468 155,739 4,539,265 4,759,110 1,028,925 3,296,876 1841 13,778 155,026 4,379,296 4,443,768 1,018,645 3,159,375 1842 13,733 149,732 4,546,246 4,235,052 1,147,256 3,087,796 1843 13,814 142,295 4,295,925 4,374,713 1,426,394 2,947,319 1844 14,103 144,687 4,237,285 4,297,867 1,358,316 2,938,551 1845 14,183 143,940 4,239,842 4,320,732 1,409,875 2,905,504

The preceding statistics all relate to the Post-Office operations under the old law; the new law went into operation July 1st, 1845.

4. Decrease, of Renenue under the New Law.

The following is an exact statement, as ascertained at the department, of the revenue derived from 926 of the larger offices in the United States for the quarter ending the 30th of September, 1845, compared with the quarter ending the 30th of September, 1844:

Revenue for the quarter ending the 30th of Sept, 1844, $464,481

The same for the quarter ending Sept. 30th, 1845, 271,473

Deficiency, about 4l£ per cent., . . . $193,008

Out of 925 post-offices, which, under the old law, paid $100 net and upwards per quarter, 10 only exhibit an increase. These show an aggregate increase of $119. These 10 are in comparatively small towns, which have of late rapidly increased in population.

The preceding statement relates to the first three months under the new law; what follows is an official statement respecting the operation of the new law during the second three months, viz: from October 1, 1845, to January 1, 1846.

The, Recenue in fifty of the large Post-Offices for the fourth quarter of 1845, compared with that which accrued in the same Offices during the fourth quarter of 1844.

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Fifty Post-Offices show a deficit of $58,484, being a fraction less than 40j

percent.

Returns made from each post-office, of the number of letters received in the month of October, 1845. 1,953 offices, paying about one seventh of the revenue of the Department, failed to comply with the order. The following is the result from the offices making returns:

Letters reduced to single rates, taxed and free, at 5 cents, . 2,139,203

Letters reduced to single rates, taxed and free, at 10 cents, 771,669

Ship letters for delivery, at 2 cents, . . . 15,348

Dropped letters at 2 cents, . . . 50,842

There were 2,139,203 five cent rates, and 771,669 ten cent rates — not so many separate letters.

The gross revenue, including the postages paid by the Executive Departments, for the half year ending 31st December, 1845, was, $1,646,638

The expenditures and liabilities same period, . 2,063,168

Deficiency for half year, . . . . . $416,530

or at the rate of about $833,060 a year.

5. Rates or Postage.

For a letter, not exceeding half an ounce in weight, (avoirdupois,) sent not exceeding 300 miles, . . . 5 cts.

Sent over 300 miles, . . . . 10"

For every half ounce, and any excess over every half ounce, the same rates of postage; and when advertised, two cents on each letter; or four cents, if the advertising cost so much, additional.

For drop letters, (not to be mailed) each > . 2"

For any printed circular, handbill, or advertisement, on quarto post, single cap, or paper not larger than single cap, unsealed, sent any distance, . . . . . 2"

For any pamphlet, magazine, periodical, or other matter of every kind, that is transmittable by mail, and has no written communication on it, of one ounce or less, or for a newspaper exceeding 1,900 square inches of surface, . . . . 2}"

For each additional ounce, or an excess greater than a half ounce, 1"

Newspapers of 1,900 square inches or less, sent by Editors or Publishers, from their offices of publication, any distance not exceeding 30 miles, ..... Free.

For any other newspaper, sent over 30, and not more than 100 miles, or any distance within the same State, . . 1 cent

Sent over such distance, . , . I}"

Where the circular is on a sheet larger than single cap, it is to be rated as a pamphlet. As the postage on these articles is chargeable on each copy,

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