Page images
PDF
EPUB

568

INDEX.

Age and Christianity, the, by R. Vaughan,
D.D., 525; preacher for the times, 526,
527; deficiencies of the pulpit ministra.
tions, 528; talents required, 529, 530;
sentiments of Dr. Vaughan, 531; his
Lectures, 532; remarks on German
speculations and new philosophy, 533;
ancient and modern civilization, scep-
ticism, 534; materialism, 536; prin-
ciples of Moses and Jews regarding
the present age, 536, 537; modern
scepticism and Christianity, 537; mi-
racles and their evidences, 539, 540;
why miracles are not wrought now,
541; publication of Christianity, 542;
truths of Christianity, 543; science of
theology, 544; progress in it, 545; its
adaptation to the past and present, 546;
preaching of the gospel, 547.
American Meteorites, by C. H. Shepard,
321. See Chemistry.
Architecture, Esthetics of Gothic, 46;
symbolism in architecture, 47, 48;
Norman and Gothic, 49; Gothic build-
ings in France and Germany, 50, 51;
Italian romanesque, 52; Greek art, 53;
various style, 54; windows, 55; Eng-
Jish cathedrals, 56, 57; continental ca-
thedrals, 58; interiors, 59, 60; orna-
ments, 61; foliations, 62, 63; Gothic
leafage, 64, 65; French and English
periods of the Gothic styles, 66; va-
rious roofs, 67, 68; manifold designs,
69; comparison of cathedrals, 70; art
of architecture, 71; use of ornaments,
72; railroad architecture, 73; archi-
tectural discoveries, 74.

Astronomy, Outlines of, by Sir J. W.
Herschel, 321. See Chemistry.

Bible Reading-book, 263.
Blanc, M. Louis, History by, 168. See
Revolution.

Bridges, Rev. C., Manual for the Young,

272.

Buchanan's, Dr., Ten Years' Conflict, 262.
Burder, Dr. H. F., on the Prophecies of
Revelation, 275.

Carlyle, Thomas, Writings of, 1; charac-
ter of them, 2; his religious opinions,
3; his notions of faith, 4; apostle of
the age,' 5; his notions of religion, 6;
popular forms of religion, 8, 9; his er-
roneous notions, 11, 12; his specula-
tions, 13; regarding religion, 14; his
defects, 15, 16; his contrarieties, 17;
his philosophy adopted from Germany,
18, 19; his transcendental mysticism,
20; its scepticism, 21; its pantheism;
22; his love of mystery, 23; his notion
on intuition and logic, 24, 25; his
mystical speculations, 26, 27; his half-
truths, 28, 29; in respect of religion,
30; his works' in religion, 31, 32; his
notion of the gospel, 33; his politics,
34; government and liberty; 35, 36;
his peculiar style, 37; its vigour, 38;
examples, 39; its coarseness, 40, 41;
his excellences as a writer, 42; his appa-
rent contradictions, 43; his bias of
mind, 44, 45.

Cheever's Dr., Pilgrim Fathers, 263.
Chemistry of the Stars, 321; are the stars
inhabited? 332, 323; materials of the
stars, 324; jury, practical arguments of
Bonaparte, 325; luminaries of the solar
system, 326; stellary luminaries, 327;
opinions of the superstitious jury re-
garding them, 328, 332; opinion of the
foreman, 333; agreement, 334; conjec-
tures of Sir J. Herschel, 335, 336;
component parts of the sun and planets,
337; superficial condition of the moon,
338; discovery of Sir D. Brewster, 339;
meteoric stones, 340, 341; chemical
analysis of them, 342, 343; densities of
the heavenly bodies, 344; analysis of
terrestrial bodies, 345, 346; terrestrial
and stellary bodies differ, 347, 348; life
in the heavenly luminaries, 349; their
light and heat, 350, 351; uncertain
conjectures, 352, 353; as to living
beings in the stars, 354, 355; sum of
the argument, 356.

Christ the Spirit of Christianity, by
A. J. Morris, 275.

Christianity and Civilization, 265.
Churches and Church Ornaments, by

H. Durandus, 46. See Architecture.
Colonial Empire, England's, danger of
its disruption, 463; Colonial Office and
Canada, 464; Earl Grey and British
America, 465; and the West Indies,
466; and the Cape of Good Hope, 467;
movement of Sir W. Molesworth, 468;
opposition of the colonies to Earl Grey,
constitution for Australia, 469; state of
New Zealand and Ceylon, 470; the
Wakefield system, and South Australia,
471; leading advocates for systematic
colonization, 472; evil policy of Earl
Grey, 473; its effects, 474; the art of
colonization, 475; necessity for it, 476;
room in the colonies, 477; necessities
of the colonies, 478; price of land, 479;
settlement of South Australia, 480; its
success, 481; operations of the colonial
office, 482, 483; enormities in colonial
government, 484. 485; colonial laws,
486, and their administration, 487; de-
spatches and instructions from home,
488; difficulties of governors, 489;
system of government proposed by Mr.
Wakefield, 490; limitations of it, 491;
plan of Mr. Roebuck, 492; wild lands,
493; Mr. Wakefield's ecclesiastical
plans, 494; his anticipations of chartism
and socialism, 495; development of the
nation, 496; increase of wealth, 497;
increase of population, 498; progress
of society, 499, 500; relief by coloniza-
tion, 501, 502.
Congregational Normal School, 268.
Coningsby, or the New Generation, 118.
See D'Israeli.

Cossacks of the Ukraine, by Count Kran-
sinski, 264.

Cowe's, Rev. R., No Truth, no Life, 271.
Cowper's Letters, 75. See Letters.
Cranmer and Joan Bocher, 279.
Cromwell, Oliver, Letters and Speeches
of, 1. See Carlyle.

D'Israeli, B., Esq., his character as an
author and statesman, 118, 119; his po-
litical morality, 120; his peculiar cha.
racteristics, 121, 122; his Revolu-
tionary Epic,' 123; its pretensions, 124;
his Alarcos,' 125; his appearance in
parliament, 126; character of his works,
127; of his politics, 128, 129; his po-
litical history, 130; his policy and tac-
tics, 131; identified with the protec-
tionists, 132; influence of the Jews in
Europe, 132; eminent Jew politicians,
133; famous Jews in past ages, 134; in

NO. XX.

modern times, 135; distinguished young
men, 136; wit of Mr. D'Israeli, 137;
his false eloquence, 138.
Dobson's, J., Reasons for leaving the
Establishment, 274.

Douglas Jerrold's Man made of Monev,
192; his writings and character, 193;
his humour and wit, 194, 195; public
life in London and Edinburgh, 196;
comic writings, 197; humorous cha-
racters, 198, 199; witty sallies of Mr.
Jerrold, 200, 201; his sentiments, 202,
203; his satire of the Man made of
Money, 204; his views on human pro-
gress, 205; on war, 206; on capital
punishment and his serious opinions,

207.

Egypt, a popular description of, 264.
Ethics of Art-art and religion how re-
lated, 441; Greek painting, 443; dis-
similitude intended by artists, 443; two
kinds of art, direct and symbolical, 444;
impressions from, 445; poetical expres-
sions, 446; ideas conveyed, 447; pious
artists, or men of genius, 448; art as a
teacher, 449; its influence, 450, 451;
its connexion with religion, 452, 453;
religion of artists, 454, 455; power of
art, 456; of paintings and statues, 457;
their evil, 458; cautions, 459; influ-
ence of art on the irreligious, 460;
prospects of art as a teacher, 461;
use of picture galleries and museums,
462.

PP

Ethnology, the unity of mankind, 408;
ethnology in relation to theology, 409;
bodily peculiarities of the human race,
410; apparent varieties, 411; changes
produced variously, 412, 413; human
hair different from wool, 414; colour
of the skin, 415; causes of the differ-
ence, 416; various coloured Jews, 417;
Indo-Germanic tribes, 418; Ethiopian
races, 419; Egyptians, 420; Negro
races and Mongolians, 421; Chinese
and Americans, 422; recapitulation,
423; causes of the difference in the
complexion and skull of the human
family, 424; illustrative proofs, 425;
did mankind descend from one pair?
426; ancient traditions, 427; sacri-
ficial rites, 428; languages, 429, 430;
their changes, their lessons, 431; philo-
logical notes, 432, 433; arrangement
proposed by Schlegel, 434; European
languages, 435, 436; oriental languages,
437, 438; chronological hypotheses,
439; science and Revelation harmo-
nious, 440.

Facts in a Clergyman's Life, by Rev.
C. B. Tayler, 268.
Fleming's Fall of the Papacy, 262.
Forbes on Superficial Knowledge, 263.

German Language in One Volume,
276,

Green's, S., Biblical Dictionary, 268.
Green's, S. G., Addresses to Children,
268.

Hall's, N., 'It is L.' Jesus in the Storm,
276.

Hampden's, Dr., case, by R. Jebb, 271.
Hare's Parish Sermons, 273.
Herbert's Picture, Correspondence, 276.
Hinton's, J. H., Athanasia, 274.
Holy Spirit, the Work of, by W. H.
Stowell, 357; essentials of Christianity,
the work of the Spirit, 358; outline of
Mr. Stowell's lectures, 359, 360; the
nature of the subject of the Spirit's in-
fluence, 361; the consciousness of
man's moral nature, 362; his moral
condition, 363; human depravity, 364;
the remedy, inefficacy of moral suasion,
365; divine influence indispensable,
366; perfectly consistent with human
freedom, 367; man in ruin, but respon-
sible, 368; moral transformation by the
Spirit, 369; our Saviour's teaching,
370; testimonies of Scripture to the in-
fluence of the Spirit, 371; its character
and effects, 372, 373; mystery of this
influence, 374, 375; church notions of
the Spirit's influence, 376; errors of
mysticism and church rites, 377; Ger-
man mysticism, 378, 379; proofs of the
Spirit's influence, 380; uniform fruits,
381, 382; progress of spiritual life, 383;
character of Mr. Stowell's argument
and style, 384, 386.

Hungary and Transylvania, by J. Paget,
548; corrupt government of Austria,
549; policy of Prince Metternich, 550;
agitation in Austria, 551; revolutions
of 1830 and 1848, reforms in Hun-
gary, 553; assent of the emperor, 554 ;
policy of Austria to Hungary, 555; war
of Austria against Hungary, 556; ab-
dication of the emperor Ferdinand and
its consequences, 557; Hungary un-
aided in contest with Austria, 558;
Russian aggression, 559; memorial to
Lord John Russell, 560; policy of
England, 561; design of Russia, 562;
appeal of Kossuth to Lord Palmerston,
563; relation of Russia to Turkey,
564; position of England, 565; parti-
tionment of Russia, 566.

Ideas, or Outlines of Philosophy, by A.
C. G. Jobert, 264.

Images, by W. W. Champneys, 272.
India, Evangelization of, by Dr. Wilson,

272.

Infidelity, Modern, by J. Garbett, 272.
Italian Painters, Lives of, by R. Duppa,
441. See Ethics.

James's, J. A., Tribute of Respect, 275.
Jonah's Life and Mission, by P. Fair-
bairn, 263.

Junius, Letters by, 75. See Letters.
Junius Secundus and Dr. Campbell, 260;
design and faults of Junius, 261.

Kingsley's Village Sermons, 273.

Lamartine, A., History by, 168. See Re-
volution.

Legendary Art, by Mrs. Jameson, 208;
her sacred legends, angels, 209, 210;
female saints, 211; exploits of St.
George, 212, 213; St. Sebastian, 214;
St. Christopher, St. Nicholas, and St.
Catherine, 215; St. Barbara, 216; St.
Ursula, 217; St. Margaret, 218; St.
Cecilia, St. Agnes, St. Agatha, St. Lu-
cia, 219; Dorothea, St. Justina, 220,
221; various legends, 222; their use
in the dark ages, 223.
Letters of the Earl of Chesterfield, 75;
varions fame, 76; famous writers, 76;
early life of Chesterfield, 77; his early
political history, 78; made lord lieu-
tenant of Ireland, 79; political changes,
78, 79; Junius, his famous letters and
satire, 80, 81; Chesterfield's letters, 82;
his character, 83; Junius to the Dukes
of Grafton and Bedford, 84, 86; satire
in various authors, 87; Junius and
Chesterfield compared, 88; Cowper, his
early history, 89; his public service,
90; his madness, 91; his acquaintance
with Mr. Newton, 92; his writings,
character of his letters, 93; his humour,
94; his tenderness of spirit, 95; his
glimpses of hope, 96; his composition,
97; comparison of the letters of Junius,
Chesterfield, and Cowper, 98.
Liturgy of St. James, by Rev. W.
Trollope, 255; sentiments of Mr. Trol-
lope, 256.

London, Past and Present, by P. Cun-
ningham, 386; its ancient condition
and progress in the middle ages, 387;
Stowe's history, 388; character of Mr.
Cunningham's, 389; notices of its site
in centuries past, 390; old London bridge,
391; early notices of London, 392;

Westminster and its abbey, 393; events
at London as the capital of Mercia,
394; under the Saxons, 395; its com-
merce, 396; election of William the
Conqueror, 397; its population, 398;
monuments in the city, 399; outrages
in the city, 400; customs among the
citizens, 401; the Jews and guilds,
402; London in the thirteenth century,
403; feasting of the citizens, 404, 405;
London in the fifteenth century, 406;
other antiquities worthy of research,
407.

Macdonald's Life, by W. K. Tweedie,

265.

Medical Missions, Lectures on, 269.
Michelet, History by, 168. See Revo-
lution.

Mignet, History by, 168. See Revolution.
Milton, his Prose Works, by A. St. John,

224; execution of Charles I., 225; acts
of the council of state, 226; Milton en-
gaged as Latin secretary, 227; his 'Te-
nure of Kings and Magistrates,' 228;
justified by Milton, 229; his foreign
correspondence, 230; his Iconoclastes,'
231; his defence of it, 232; his anta-
gonist, Salmasius, 233; his defence of
King Charles, 234, 235; Milton's reply
to Salmasius, 236; its character, 237;
its effects, 238; Milton loses his sight,
239; his resignation of office, 240;
works against Milton, 241; his replies,
242, 243; his Paradise Lost' and other
works, 244, 245; his estimation at
court, 216; his influence in the nation,
247; his political opinions, 248; his
motives in office, 249, 250; his desire
for liberty of conscience, 251; his con-
temporaries, Howe, Goodwin, and
Owen, 252; his system of divinity,

253.

Moriah, or Rites of Ancient Israel, by
R. W. Fraser, 264.

Mornings among the Jesuits, by Rev. R.
M. Seymour, 266.

Mountains of the Bible, by Dr. McFar-
lane, 270.

Nehemiah, character and history of, by
Rev. R. Woodward, 266.
Nemesis of Faith, by G. A. Froude, 139.
See Philosophy of Religion.
Northern Antiquities, by M. Mallet, 99;
ethnological studies, 100; original na-
tions of Europe, 101; originated in
Central Asia, 102; Cimbri, Celts, and
Goths, 103; Odinism and Christianity
in Europe, 104; primitive religion of

Europe, 105; druidism of Britain, 106;
triades of the ancient Britons, 107;
their wise oracles, 108; originated from
ancient revelation, 109; traced to Noah,
110; traditions of eastern origin, 111;
changes in the human family, 112;
Scandinavian religion and literature,
113; the Edda,' its testimony concern-
ing Baldur, 114; virgins in Valhalla,
115; principles of the Norse religion,
116; its tradition of the deluge, 117.
Nottidge's, Rev. J. J., Correspondence,

270.

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

Paley's Evidences, with Notes, by Rev.
T. R. Birks, 265.
Philosophy and Religion, by J. D. Mo-
rell, 139; obscurity of the work, 140;
German neology, 141; rationalism and
the gospel, 142; German transcenden-
talism and pantheism contrasted with
British Christianity, 143; theories of
Mr. Morell, 144, 145; his theory of
perception, 146; consciousness, 147;
intuition, 148; false notion of Mr. Mo-
rell, 149, 150; his distinctions, 151,
152; erroneous views, 153, 154; lead
to mysticism, 155; dependent condi-
tion of human nature, 156; essence of
religion, 157; popular theology, 158;
sentiments of Mr. Newman, 159; his
portraiture of an orthodox divine, 160;
popular Christianity, 161; scepticism
of Mr. Newman, 162; worthlessness of
his theories, 163, 164; his rash specu-
lation, 165, 166; his literary ability,

167.

Pontificate of Leo X., by W. Roscoe, 441.
See Ethics.

Rabelais, F., the Works of, by Sir T.
Urquhart, 502; his early history, he
becomes a monk, 503; he becomes a
semi-Lutheran, 504; he studies medi-
cine, 505; his literary works, 506; his
notions and style, 507; character of his
Chronique and Pantagruel, 508, 509;
he accompanies Bishop Bellay to Rome,
510; his Life of Gargantua, 511; his
character contrasted with that of Cal-
vin, 512; his various History and
Works, 513; estimates of his character,
514; labours of his later life, 515; his
humour at death, 516; review of his
chief Works, 517; his absurdity and
obscene immorality, 518; character of

[ocr errors]

his Works, by Mr. Coleridge, 519; its
low jests, 520; and unchecked drivel-
lings, 521, 522; his chief characters,
522; a characteristic passage from
'Pantagruel,' 524.

Railways of the Kingdom, by H. Scri-
vener, 271.

Religious Movements in Germany, by H.
Cottrell, Esq., 262.

Religious Worship, Lessons on, 276.
Revolution, the French, history of, 168;
History, by Mignet, 169; Thiers' His-
tory, 190; its character, 171; the His-
tories of Lamartine, Michelet, and
Louis Blanc, 172; genius of Michelet,
173; lettres de cachet and state prisons
under Louis XVI., 174, 175; Michelet
compared with Carlyle, 176, 177;
French notions of fraternity, 178, 179;
Louis Blanc's History and his Essays,
180, 181; History of the Girondists, by
Lamartine, 182, 183; its character,
184; character of Robespierre, 185,
187; of the translation of Lamartine's
history, 188; results of the revolution
to the French people, 189; the past
and the present state of the French,
190; recent history of the French,
191.

Savonarola, a Poem, 281; biographies of
him, 282; festival of St. George at Fer-
rara, 283; the amusements, 284; early
life of Savonarola, 285; his flight to the
Dominican cloister at Bologna, 286;
abominations of the papacy, 287; at-
tempts at reformation, 288; enormities
at Rome, 289; state of the universities
and learning, 290; revival of learning
and controversy, 292; popular manners
in Germany, France, and Italy, 293;
preaching of the age. 294, 295; of Sa-
vonarola, 296; and Miranuola, 297;
the house of Medici, 298; sermons of
Savonarola, 299; his zeal for reforma-
tion, 300, 301; preaching of Geiler at
Strasburg, 302, 303; sermons of Savo-
narola, policy of wicked priests, 304;
his views of justification, 305; his

[ocr errors]

Triumphus Crucis,' 306; revolutions
of Florence, 307; Sforza at Milan, 308;
the emperor Charles VIII., 309, 310:
he captures Florence, 311: power of
Savonarola, 312; his preaching to the
chief citizens, 313; confederacy against
him, 314; his influence, 315, 316; his
enemies, and excommunication by the
pope, 317; his appeal against the pope,
318; the ordeal by fire, 319; torture
and martyrdom of Savonarola, 320.
Schlegel, Works of, by E. J. Millington.
See Ethics.

Scottish Congregational Jubilee, 267.
Scripture illustrated from Geography, 274.
Scripture Metaphors, by Rev. J. L.
Adamson, 266.

Sea-side Book, by W. H. Harvey, 269.
Shakespeare, Lectures on, by S. T. Cole-
ridge, 441. See Ethics.
Shakespeare, Religion of, by W. J.
Birch. See Ethics.

Smith's Parallels between England and
Hungary, 548. See Hungary.
Soul, the, her Sorrows and Aspirations,
by F. Newman, 138.

Spiritual Reign, the, by Clemens, 270.
Stars and the Earth, 321. See Che-
mistry.

Stowell's work on the Holy Spirit, 262.
Stuart, Moses, on the Old Testament,
271.

Sunrise in Italy, by H. Morley, 259.

Thiers, A., History by, 168. See Revo-
lution.

Unreformed Abuses in Church and State,
by J. Wade, 266.

Vial the Seventh, 258.

Wardlaw's, G., Experimental Evidence,
269.

Weld, Mr., and Dr. J. P. Smith, 278.
Wells', A., Normal School, 268.
Wells', A., Position of the Congregational
Churches, 275.

Winslow's Grace and Truth, 267.

Savill & Edwards, Printers, 4, Chandos-street Covent garden.

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »