Page images
PDF
EPUB

.

.

Page TRAIT XXIV. His Prudence in frustrating the

Designs of his Enemies 559
XXV. His Tenderness towards others,

and his Severity towards him-
self

563 XXVI. His love never degenerated into

cowardice, but reproved and

consoled as occasion required 565 XXVII. His Perfect Disinterestedaess. 571 XXVIII. His Condescension in labour

ing at times with his own
hands

573 XXIX. The Respect he manifested for

the holy Estate of Matrimony,
while Christian Prudence en-
gaged him to live in a State of
Celibacy

577 XXX. The Ardour of his Love

581 XXXI. His generous Fears and succeeding Consolations

584 XXXII. The grand Subject of his glory

ing and the Evangelical Man-
ner in which he maintained his

Superiority over false Apostles 586
XXXIII. His Patience and Fortitude un-

der the severest Trials . 588 XXXIV. His modest Firmness before Magistrates

590

[ocr errors]

A

VINDICATION

OF

THE REV. MR. WESLEY'S

Calm Address to our American Colonies:"

IN THREE LETTERS

TO MR. CALEB EVANS:

BY

JOHN FLETCHER,

VICAR OF MADELEY, SALOP.

It will probably seem strange, that Clergymen should meddle with a controversy, which has hitherto been considered as altogether political. But the reader's surprise, in this respect, will probably cease, if he give himself the trouble to read these Letters. He will then see, that the American controversy is closely connected with Christianity in general, and with Protestantism in particular ; and that, of consequence, it is of a religious, as well as of a civil nature.

Is it not granted on all sides, that the gospel leads to the practice of strict morality ? Is it not an important branch of such morality“ to honour and obey the king; to extend that honour and obedience, in a scriptural and constitutional manner, to “ all that are put in authority under him :-to submit ourselves to all our governors ;-to order ourselves lowly and reverently to all our betters; --to hurt no body by word or deed ;--and to be true and just in all our dealings;" give every one his due, 'tribute to whom tribute is due, and custom to whom custom?' we not teach this doctrine to our children, when we instruct them in the first principles of Christianity? If Divinity, therefore, can cast light upon the question, which divides Great Britain and her Colonies; is it impertinent in Divines to hold out the light of their science, and peaceably to use what the Apostle calls the sword of the Spirit; that the material sword, unjustly drawn by those who are in the wrong, may be sheathed ; and that a speedy end may be put to the effusion of Christian blood ? Another reason influences the Author to

Do

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »