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Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1857, by

A. S. BARNES & CO.,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.

RTEREOTYPED BY

THOMAS B. SMITH, 82 & 84 Beekman Street, N. Y.

PRINTED BY
GEORGE W. WOOD,

51 John St.

PREFACE TO VOLUME VI.

ruary, 1850.

It will be seen that the great speech delivered by Mr. Clay, February 5th and 6th, 1850, on his Resolutions of Compromise, is given in the Appendix of the third volume of this work, entitled the Last Seven Years of Mr. Clay's Life. There are also some brief extracts, in the Appendix to that volume, of Mr. Clay's speeches on the Compromises of 1850. But the last part of this volume, beginning on page 391, contains all the most important speeches of Mr. Clay in the Thirty-first Congress, with the exception of that of the 5th and 6th of Feb

As the editor found occasion to interweave numerous notes between speeches and parts of speeches, delivered in the Thirty-first Congress, the introductions to these speeches are more brief, their place being supplied by the notes.

The editor has given, in his selections from the debates of the Thirty-first Congress, many brief replies and rejoinders of Mr. Clay, which are not properly speeches ; but nevertheless too interesting to be omitted. Mr. Clay was often excited, in those debates, to make replies and rejoinders of a very spicy character, and some of them are extremely interesting and instructive. Many of Mr. Clay's most brilliant displays of intellect and power were occasioned by momentary excitement; and he never, in his long-protracted career of public life, shone brighter, and never was more powerful in debate, than in the long contest of 1850. He was then an old man, and in feeble health ; but his solicitude for the country, in that crisis of its affairs, brought out all the wealth of his experience, and roused all the fervor

of his patriotism. He earnestly hoped, and strenuously endeavored, by his last great effort, to leave the country in peace on the slavery question ; and he left the world, feeling that that object had been accomplished. Happy for him that he died at such a time.

C. COLTON.

NEW YORK, January 15, 1867.

)

CONTENTS OF VOLUME VI.

PAGS

ON THE CUMBERLAND ROAD BILL

ON THE APPOINTING AND REMOVING POWER, .

ON THE PUBLIC LANDS,

ON OUR RELATIONS WITH FRANCE,

84

ON THE ADMISSION OF ARKANSAS,

86

ON THE FORTIFICATION BILL,

88

ON THE RECOGNITION OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF TEXAS,

41

ON THE EXPUNGING RESOLUTION, .

45

ON THE SUB-TREASURY BILL,

61

ON THE PRE-EMPTION BILL,

87

ON THE PLAN OF THE SUB-TREASURY,

95

ON THE DOCTRINE OF INSTRUCTION,

184

ON ABOLITION,

189

A SPEECH AT BUFFALO,

160

ON MR. CALHOUN'S LAND BILL,

165

ON THE SUB-TREASURY BILL,

169

AT THE BALTIMORE CONVENTION OF YOUNG MEN,

192

ON THE STATE OF THE COUNTRY UNDER MR. VAN BUREN,

195

AT THE NASHVILLE CONVENTION,

ON THE REPEAL OF THE SUB-TREASURY LAW,

220

ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE PROCEEDS OF THE PUBLIC LANDS, .

220 - H

DEFENSE OF MR. WEBSTER,

271

ON ME. TYLER'S VETO OF THE BANK BILL,

274

REJOINDER TO MR. RIVES'S DEFENSE OF MR. TYLER,

291

ON A GENERAL BANKRUPT LAW,

297 >

ON THE ABOLITION OF THE VETO POWER, .

801

EXPLANATION OF THE COMPROMISE TARIFF,

820

ON MEASURES OF PUBLIC POLICY, .

823

MR. CLAY'S VALEDICTORY TO THE SENATE, .

859

ON RETIRING TO PRIVATE LIFE,

859

REPLY TO MR. MENDENHALL,

885

GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO SPEECHES IN THE THIRTY-FIRST CONGRESS, . 891

ON FATHER MATHEW,

899

ON THE ADMISSION OF CALIFORNIA, .

894

ON MR. FOOTE'S MOTION FOR A SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO PREPARE A

BILL OF COMPROMISE ON MR. CLAY'S AND MR. BELL'S RESOLUTIONS, . 410

ON ABOLITION PETITIONS,

419

ON GJVING LANDS FOR RAILROADS,

ON THE SEARCH FOR SIR JOHN FRANKLIN,

424

ON THE REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THIRTEEN,

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