The Cherokees and Their Chiefs: In the Wake of Empire

Գրքի շապիկի երեսը
University of Arkansas Press, 01 հնվ, 1998 թ. - 350 էջ
In this newly researched and synthesized history of the Cherokees, Hoig traces the displacement of the tribe and the Trail of Tears, the great trauma of the Civil War, the destruction of tribal autonomy, and the Cherokee people's phoenix-like rise in political and social stature during the twentieth century.

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The Cherokees and their chiefs: in the wake of empire

Հաճախորդի կարծիքը  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Hoig (journalism, emeritus, Univ. of Central Oklahoma) fills a niche in the historiography of the Cherokee by focusing on their chiefs from the period of white contact to 1985. He thereby provides ... Read full review

The Cherokees and their chiefs: in the wake of empire

Հաճախորդի կարծիքը  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Hoig (journalism, emeritus, Univ. of Central Oklahoma) fills a niche in the historiography of the Cherokee by focusing on their chiefs from the period of white contact to 1985. He thereby provides ... Read full review

Բովանդակություն

Historical Overview
1
Out of a Mystic Past
7
Under British Rule
17
Come the Kings Men
31
My Tongue Is My Pen
45
A Wall to the Skies
57
New Elder Brother
67
An Effort at Arms
79
The Agony of Removal
163
Expulsion from Texas
177
Reunion and Conflict
191
New Nation Old Feuds
205
A House Redivided
219
Resisting Dissolution
235
An End to Sovereignty
247
The Fourth Phoenix
259

Intrigue and Assassination
89
As Long as Waters Flow
101
A New Breed of Beloved Men
115
Cherokee Nation West
133
Dark Clouds Gathering
145
Those Who Stayed Behind
263
Notes
269
Bibliography
307
Index
323
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Common terms and phrases

Սիրված հատվածներ

Էջ 68 - I have a pipe and a little tobacco to give the commissioners to smoke in friendship. I look on you and the red people as my children. Your having determined on peace is most pleasing to me, for I have seen much trouble during the late war.
Էջ 130 - We appeal to the magnanimity of the American Congress for justice, and the protection of the rights, liberties, and lives of the Cherokee people. We claim it from the United States, by the strongest...
Էջ 63 - Indeed, much has been advanced on the want of what you term civilization among the Indians; and many proposals have been made to us to adopt your laws, your religion, your manners and your customs.
Էջ 167 - Georgia, especially, multitudes were allowed no time to take any thing with them, except the clothes they had on. Well-furnished houses were left a prey to plunderers, who, like hungry wolves, follow in the train of the captors. These wretches rifle the houses, and strip the helpless, unoffending owners of all they have on earth. Females, who have been habituated to comforts and comparative affluence, are .driven on foot before the bayonets of brutal men. Their feelings are mortified by vulgar and...
Էջ 167 - The Cherokees are nearly all prisoners. They have been dragged from their houses, and encamped at the forts and military posts, all over the nation.
Էջ 4 - Territory, so long as such rights shall remain unextinguished by treaty between the United States and such Indians, or to include any territory which, by treaty with any Indian tribe, is not, without the consent of said tribe, to be included within the territorial limits or jurisdiction of any State or Territory...
Էջ 161 - If one hundred persons are ignorant of their true situation and are so completely blinded as not to see the destruction that awaits them, we can see strong reasons to justify the action of a minority of fifty persons to do what the majority would do if they understood their condition, to save a nation from political thralldom and moral degradation.
Էջ 14 - ... that they can, by the wave of a swan's wing, deliver a wretch condemned by the council and already tied to the...
Էջ 68 - Your having determined on peace is most pleasing to me, for I have seen much trouble during the late war. I am old, but I hope yet to bear children, who will grow up and people our nation, as we are now to be under the protection of Congress and shall have no more disturbance. The talk I have given is from the young warriors I have raised in my town, as well as myself. They rejoice that we have peace, and we hope the chain of friendship will never more be broken.

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