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President and vice-president in no way differs from an ordinary election by ballot.

1892.

Electoral College as chosen in the election of November 7, 1892, Grover Cleveland being chosen President and Adlai E. Stevenson VicePresident.

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GRAVES OF THE PRESIDENTS.

WASHINGTON'S GRAVE.

THE

HE grave of Washington has so long been the Mecca of thou

sands of patriotic Americans, that a description of it in. these pages can scarcely contain anything fresh or novel. The vault in which lies the dust of the great Washington was built, in accordance with provisions of the President's will, in Mt. Vernon, the spot of all others on earth that Washington loved best. It is a simple structure of brick, with stone trimmings and an arched roof. Over the gateway, on a marble tablet, is the single inscription, “Within this enclosure rest the remains of General George Washington.” Within the vestibule of the vault lie two coffins, those of Washington and his wife. The grounds and the vault are kept in excellent repair by the Mt. Vernon association.

GRAVES OF JOHN ADAMS AND JOHN Q. ADAMS.

Beneath the quaint old Unitarian church of Quincy, Massachusetts, lie the remains of two American Presidents, father and son, John Adams and John Quincy Adams. Beside them are the bodies of their wives. The bodies lie in leaden caskets, placed in cases hewn from solid stone, in a little vault which underlies the main room of the cdifice. The tombs are seldom visited and are dingy and uncared for. In the room above may be found the following inscription: “Beneath these walls are deposited the mortal remains of John Adams, son of

John and Susanna (Boyleston) Adams, second President of the United States, born 19-30 October, 1735. On the 4th of July, 1776, he pledged his lise, his fortune and his sacred honor to the independence of his country. On the 3rd of September, 1783, he affixed his signature to the definite treaty with Great Britain, which acknowledged that independence and consummated the redemption of that pledge. On the 4th of July, 1826, he was summoned to the independence of immortality and the judgment of his God. This house will bear witness to his piety, this town (his birth-place) to his munificence, history to his patriotism, posterity to the depth and composure of his mind."

On the other side of the pulpit is the tablet that bears testimony to the worth of John Quincy Adams. The inscription reads thus: “Near this place reposes all that could die of John Quincy Adams, son of John and Abigail (Smith) Adams, sixth President of the United States. Born 11th July, 1767, amidst the storms of civil commotion, he nursed the vigor which inspires a Christian. For more than half a century, whenever his country called for his labors in either hemisphere, or in any capacity, he never spared them in her cause. On the 24th of December, he signed the second treaty with Great Britain, which restored peace within her borders. On the 23d of February, 1848, he closed 16 years of eloquent defense of the lessons of his youth by dying at his post in her great National council. A son worthy of his father, a citizen shedding glory on his country, a scholar ambitious to advance mankind, this Christian sought to walk humbly in the sight of his God.”

THOMAS JEFFERSON'S GRAVE.

On the fly-leaf of a pocket account-book Jefferson once wrote these words: “Choose some unfrequented vale in the park, where is no sound to break the stillness but a brook, that, babbling, winds among the woods; no mark of human shape that has been there, unless the skeleton of some poor wretch who sought that place cut to despair and die in. Let it be among ancient and venerable oaks; intersperse some gloomy evergreens. Appropriate one-half to the use of my family; the other to strangers, servants, etc. Let it look upon a small and distant part of Blue niountain." His wishes have been

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