The Angler in Wales: Or, Days and Nights of Sportsmen, Հատոր 1

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Richard Bentley, 1834 - 348 էջ
Includes anecdotes of Shelley and Byron.
 

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Էջ 258 - I love all waste And solitary places ; where we taste The pleasure of believing what we see Is boundless, as we wish our souls to be : And such was this wide ocean, and this shore More barren than its billows.
Էջ 326 - When the cold water from the autumnal floods begins to swell the rivers, this fish tries to return to the sea ; but numbers of the smaller ones hide themselves during the winter in the mud, and many of them form, as it were, masses together. " Various authors have recorded the migration of eels in a singular way, such as Dr. Plot, who, in his History of Staffordshire, says, that they pass in the night, across meadows, from one pond to another ;* and Mr.
Էջ 329 - I am endeavouring to find a reason for the effect of crimping and cold in preserving the curd of fish. Have you ever thought on this subject ? " HAL — Yes : I conclude that the fat of salmon between the flakes, is mixed with much albumen and gelatine, and is extremely liable to decompose, and by keeping it cool the decomposition is retarded, and by the boiling salt and water, which is of a higher temperature than that of common boiling water, the albumen is coagulated, and the curdiness preserved.
Էջ 326 - Trans. vol. iv.) Eels migrate from the salt water ' of different sizes, but I believe never when they ' are above a foot long, and the great mass of them ' are only from two and a half to four inches. They ' feed, grow, and fatten, in fresh water. In small
Էջ 324 - Shaffhausen . does not prevent them from making their way to the Lake of Constance, where I have seen many very large eels. pHYS. — You have shown, that some eels come from the sea, but I do not think the facts prove, that all eels are derived from that source. HAL. — Pardon me— I have not concluded. There are eels in the Lake of Neufchatel, which communicates by a stream with the Rhine ; but there are none in the Leman Lake, because the Rhone makes a subterraneous fall below Geneva ; and though...
Էջ 328 - ... ate better; but I want the Harvey or Reading sauce. HAL.— Pray let me entreat you to use no other sauce than the water in which he was boiled. I assure you this is the true Epicurean way of eating fresh salmon ; and for the trout, use only a little vinegar and mustard— a sauce a la Tartare, without the onions.
Էջ 327 - ... sea in October or November, probably when they experience the cold of the first autumnal rains. Those that are not of the largest size, as I said before, pass the winter in the deepest parts of the mud of rivers and lakes, and do not seem to eat much, and remain, I believe, almost torpid. Their increase is not certainly known in any given time, but must depend upon the quantity of their food : but it is probable they do not become of the largest size from the smallest, in one or even two seasons;...
Էջ 325 - Danube, — though some of these lakes and morasses are wonderfully fitted for them, and though they are found abundantly in the same countries, in lakes and rivers connected with the ocean and the Mediterranean. Yet, when brought into confined water in the Danube, they fatten and thrive there. As to the instinct which leads young eels to seek fresh water, it is difficult to reason ; probably they prefer warmth, and, swimming at the surface in the early summer, find the lighter water warmer, and...
Էջ 330 - POIET.— Would not the fish be still better, or at least possess more curd, if caught in a net, and killed immediately ? In the operation of tiring by the reel there must be considerable muscular exertion, and I should suppose expenditure of oily matter. HAL. — There can be no doubt but the fish would be in a more perfect state for the table from the nets ; yet a fish in high season does not lose so much fat during the short time he is on the hook as to make much difference ; and I am not sure...
Էջ 329 - I conclude that the fat of salmon between the flakes of the muscles, is mixed with much albumen and gelatine, and is extremely liable to decompose ; and by keeping it cool, the decomposition is retarded : and by the boiling salt and water, which is of a higher temperature than that of common boiling water, the albumen is coagulated, and the curdiness preserved. The crimping, by preventing the irritability of the fibre from being gradually exhausted, seems to preserve it so hard and crisp, that it...

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