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Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year one thousand eight

hundred and thirty-six, by Jared Sparks, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

EMME

STEREOTYP ED.

CAMBRIDGE:
FOLSOM, WELLS, AND THURSTON,

PRINTERS TO THE UNIVERSITY.

PART FOURTH;

(CONTINUE D);

CONTAINING

CORRESPONDENCE

OFFICIAL AND PRIVATE,

FROM

THE BEGINNING OF HIS PRESIDENCY

TO

THE END OF HIS LIFE.

CORRESPONDENCE

OFFICIAL AND PRIVATE,

WHILE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

AND AFTERWARDS.

TO JOHN ADAMS, VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE

UNITED STATES.

Saturday, 27 November, 1794. DEAR SIR, I have not been able to give the papers herewith enclosed more than a hasty reading, returning them without delay, that you may offer the perusal of them to whomsoever you shall think proper. The picture, drawn in them, of the Genevese is really interesting and affecting. The proposition of transplanting the members entire of the university of that place to America, with the requisition of means to establish the same, and to be accompanied by a considerable emigration, is important, requiring more consideration than under the circumstances of the moment I am able to bestow upon it.

That a national university in this country is a thing to be desired, has always been my decided opinion ; and the appropriation of ground and funds for it in the Federal City has long been contemplated and talked of; but how far matured, or how far the transporting of an entire seminary of foreigners, who may not understand our language, can be assimilated therein, is more than I am prepared to give an opinion

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VOL. XI.

A

upon; or, indeed, how far funds in either case are attainable.

My opinion, with respect to emigration, is, that except of useful mechanics, and some particular descriptions of men or professions, there is no need of encouragement; while the policy or advantage of its taking place in a body (I mean the settling of them in a body) may be much questioned; for by so doing they retain the language, habits, and principles, good or bad, which they bring with them. Whereas, by an intermixture with our people, they or their descendants get assimilated to our customs, measures, and laws; in a word, soon become one people.

I shall, at any leisure hour after the session is fairly opened, take pleasure in a full and free conversation with you on this subject, being with much esteem and regard, dear Sir, &c.

TO EDMUND RANDOLPH, SECRETARY OF STATE.

Private.

Philadelphia, 15 December, 1794. DEAR Sır, For the reasons mentioned to you the other day, namely, the Virginia Assembly being in session, and a plan being on foot for establishing a seminary of learning upon an extensive scale in the Federal City, it would oblige me if you and Mr. Madison would endeavour to mature the measures, which will be proper for me to pursue,* in order to bring my designs into view as soon as you can make it convenient to yourselves.

* In regard to the disposition of the shares in the Potomac and James River Navigation, which had been given to him by Virginia, and which he proposed to appropriate for purposes of education within the State.

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