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Ancient Family of Arthur. the sea coast, near the original seat of they say, would also in less than a the ancient house of Colvill, which is century be reduced to cam, or can ; still in splendour in that country. The it being the same name no doubt and younger brother of that, and many original as that city in Normandy; for more of tbe noble houses in the pro- what improbability is there in the old vince, followed the duke and his for Britons to have called in, some of the tune into England, but none, or very industrious people about Catwick-opfew of the original Britons took part zee, their neighbours, to improve the in the quarrel, looking on the Nor. marshy lands about the river Medway, mans on this occasion, with no better in the same manner as the Dutch have eye, than they did formerly on the been called in lately, in order to im: Saxons and Danes, who were avow- prove the fenny grounds in Norfolk, edly the invaders of their lands and that part thereof being called at this properties, whilft Duke William, more day, little Holland, however, this will crafty, pretended the late king Ed- account for the French's pronouncing ward's testament, to colour his inva. the Latin name of Caen, Cadomu. fion, as it clearly proved afterwards, Some will say, how came this anthe name of conquest remaining inde- cient family to be thus neglected for libly affixed to this, his perfect right, so many centuries ? this may be an. and (as he faid) legal succession.-Per- swered, that they were not in favour haps this defpotick prince made choice with the Dukes of Normandy (nor with of this Fitz Arthur to thow his re. the nation in general) since their Mewfentment to him, and through him, to ing so little regard to the ashes of the those of his nation, for their neglect conqueror of England, and withal of duty on this important occafion. acquainting the world to this day,

I will add as a carollary that Monfr. the motives of that seeming inconfidede Bras, lord of the manor of that rate act; for this family were occafionname, in his book of the Antiquities of ally

, the affertors of Gothick liberty, Caen (which he wrote above two hun which the Norman nation enjoyed dred years ago; a Roman catholick, who equal with the freelt people under the had the mortification to live, and see fun. They could not be avowed by the mass abolished in Caen for twenty the Britons in England, who were years together, during the civil wars) themselves under the yoke of their makes an honourable mention of the conquerors, the Norinans; and they family of Arthur upon alloccafions, al. could not expect any favour from the thu' ihey had embraced the reforma. then reigning kings of England de. tion before that time.-But who can scended from William. When the sufficiently tell of the calamites of those French recovered that province this wars, and of the robberies committed British family was not known to them. by the mercenaries in both parties, During the civil wars, religionis ergo, the monument of this mighty con. they were exposed to many vexations queror was pillaged, in search of trea. and persecutions, from the firit dawn fures, and his duft scattered by the of the reformation; so that it is rather winds.---This fepulchre was rebuilt a matter of surprize, that this family, by the monks, but nothing, to com- the fact and memory thereof, are not pare to it's former grandeur and mag- abolished. That favour, indeed, is ficence.

due to authentick records, monuDean-street, Soho. John A. ments, and historians of, and since

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Ancient Family of Arthur. the sea coaft, near the original seat of they say, would also in less than a the ancient house of Colvill, which is century be reduced to cam, or can ; still in fplendour in that country. The it being the same name no doubt and younger brother of that, and many original as that city in Normandy; for more of the noble houses in the pro- what improbability is there in the old vince, followed the duke and his for Britons to have called in, some of the tune into England, hut none, or very industrious people about Catwick-opfew of the original Britons took part zee, their neighbours, to improve the in the quarrel, looking on the Nor. marshy lands about the river Medway, mans on this occasion, with no better in the same manner as the Dutch have eye, than they did formerly on the been called in lately, in order to im. Saxons and Danes, who were avow- prove the fenny grounds in Norfolk, edly the invaders of their lands and that part thereof being called at this properties, whilst Duke William, more day, little Holland, however, this will crafty, pretended the late king Ed. account for the French's pronouncing ward's testament, to colour his inva. the Latin name of Caen, Cadomun. fion, as it clearly proved afterwards, Some will say, how came this anthe name of conquest remaining inde- cient family to be thus neglected for Jibly affixed to this, his perfect right, so many centuries? this may be an. and (as he said) legal succession.- Per- swered, that they were not in favour haps this despotick prince made choice with the Dukes of Normandy ( nor with of this Fitz Arthur to thow his re- the nation in general) since their newsentment to him, and through him, to ing so little regard to the ashes of the those of his nation, for their veglect conqueror of England, and withal of duty on this important occasion. acquainting the world to this day,

I will add as a carollary that Monfr. the motives of that seeming inconfidea de Bras, lord of the manor of that rate act; for this family were occafionname, in his book of the Antiquities of ally the assertors of Gothick liberty, Caen (which he wrote above two hun which the Norman nation enjoyed dred years ago; a Roman catholick, who equal with the freelt people under the had the mortification to live, and lee sun. They could not be avowed by the mass abolished in Caen for twenty the Britons in England, who were years together, during the civil wars) themselves under the yoke of their makes an honourable mention of the conquerors, the Normans; and they family of Arthur upon alloccafions, al- could not expect any favour from the thu' they had embraced the reforma. then reigning kings of England de. tion before that time. But who can scended from William. When the sufficiently tell of the calamites of those French recovered that province this wars, and of the robberies committed British family was not known totbem.by the mercenaries in both parties, During the civil wars, religionis ergo, the monument of this mighty conthey were exposed to many vexations queror was pillaged, in search of trea. and persecutions, from the first dawn fures, and his duft scattered by the of the reformation; so that it is rather winds. This fepulchre was rebuilt a matter of surprize, that this family, by the monks, but nothing, to com- the fact and memory thereof, are not pare to it's former grandeur and mag- abolished. That favour, indeed, is ficence.

due to authentick records, monuDean-street, Soho. John A. ments, and historians of, and fince

P. S. There are many cities in Ger. those times, many ending in, heim, as Manheim,

J. A-r. Bienheim, Hildesheim, &c: and in England in ham, as' Southampton, Account of Tissot's Ejay on the Diseases Ealtham, Westham, and especially

of Sedentary Persons, &c. continued Chatham, which, on account of the

from p. 456. hard pronounciation of (th) accord. E ing to the French dialect, which they Hielenda ficounts for the phren-> always pronounce (de), and their ocy, apoplexies, and other disorders omitting the (h) on all occasions, be. of the brain, which studious persons ing no letter, but only an aspiration, are liable to, all which he elucidates

with

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634.
Remedies for Sedentary Persons.

Dec, with instances in point. Other difor- what considerable, the other two rather ders he deduces froin nocturnal studies, light.“ Upon rising in a morning, and advises all men of learning not 10 a itudious person thould drink a glais ftudy by candle-light, but to go to of pure water ; in about an hour after bed betimes and rile early in the morn- he should breakfast ; fix hours after he ing. The dirtiness of too many ftu. fhould dine, having past one hour dents, he lays produces all those dif- in walking; aíter dinner he should orders which arise from obstructed per. allow himlelf an hour or two of leispiration, whillt the custom of lome in sure, becaule to sit down to study im. deferring the going to stool or urine, mediately after eating is highly per. cause often grievous disorders. Hie nicious: his fupper should be light; then enumerates the other complaints for this, there are reasons of the greatto which sedentary people are sub- est weight, because, as I observed jed, gives the preservatives to fuch before, ileep occafions a dangerous pleas are in hea th, and for those whole thora in the head; therefore the full. constitutions arsimpaired, propoles re- nels of the veficis should not be inmedies. We thall digest them into the creared before deep by too large a following view without giving his rea- meal: add to this, that the funcsons therefor.

tions of the nerves are suspended dur. Mind.-To preserve it, let it being the time of neep, and they cannot often unemployed, and the body perform digestion ; at last a soft and labour.-Dedicate an hour or two eve- refreshing tlumber is produced by the ry day to walking; or ride, or ule ablence of all irritation : but if the Such exercise as employs both the arms. Itomach is overloaded with aliments,

Food. - Avoid all fat, viscid ali- the fleep is interrupted, as the nerves ments, all aliments puffed with wind, are continually affected by the irritaor hardened either by art or nature. tion of digestion. Hence a plentiful Pulse is too flatulent, and to be avoid. fupper causes a heaviness in the head, ed at least in large quantities. --Eat Sleep is ditturbed, digestion interruptthe tender' flesh ot all young aniinals, ed, the strength impaired, and ine (except (wine and geele) not boiled in health entirely destroyed. copious broth, but roalted, or boiled in Not to lup at all, however, is dana small quantity of water : such roots, gerous; for the nerves of the learned as con gift of a light flour, not without are moveable, and easily irritated; a mixture of salt of sugar; soft herbs, and if the chile is not foon renewed which are neither to acid nor too emol- by a supply of new aliments, such is lient. Fruits, as cherries, Itrawber. the acrimony of the blood, already ries, rafberries, gooseberries, peaches, often subdued by the itrength of the grapes, pears, &c. eat when the ito. viscera, that it is an irritation of the mach is empty, with or without bread, nerves, which totally destroys the sleep. and long before, or long after having The example of Auguttus Cæfar who drank wine. They are of great ute was very moderate in eating, is very in inflammatory disorders and now fe. properly proposed to the learned, as is vers. Soft boiled eggs, well baked likewise that of the illuftrious Lewis brear, decoctions of bread, milk, Cornaro, who restored his ruined (if it does not grow acid on the to. liealth by a regular diet alone; and mach) chocolate, if not used to ex- eating but the fourth part of the quancels, and fimple food, either raw or tity of victuals eaten by his fellow ciboiled is bett. A mild leaioning of tizens, lived to an advanced age, visalt, sugar, cinnamon, ?utmeg, thyme gorous and chearful. Long fince Barsweet.marjoram, fennel, chervil, is tholus, one of the most eminent law. good for relaxed nerves. But do not yers, and a man well versed in polite use them immoderately.

literature, reduced the quantity of Digestion, helps to. Exact masti. his food and liquor to a certain weight, cation. Three meals a day, one some- and by that means preserved his intel

Many phænomena prove this pletbora; and it is evinced by a fimple observation, and one that occurs daily, viz. by tboje convulsions of the lower jaw bone, wbicb caufe a collision of the teeth in sleep, and that more strongly in boys wbın ibey bave eat a bearty jupper.

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Warm Liquors pernicious, lectual faculties during the whole ders. Nor is it to be wondered at, if course of his life. A regular diet is ca- warm beverages are more hurtful to pable of effecting every thing: ftudious studious men, who are naturally weak men, however, whilst they take care of and feeble, than to others; for they their health, ought not to forget, that a are not troubled with an over thick, man, who is well, should not so con-. but, on the contrary, with too thin a fine hinise!f to rules, as not to break blood. You are well aware, respecthrough them, when he thinks proper: table auditors, that the density of the for a constant habit is real slavery: blood is as the motion of the solids : and I have known several learned and the fibres of the learned are relaxed, ftudious men, who were so scrupulous their motions are now, and their blood with regard to their hours of eating of consequence thin. Bleed a ploughand going to bed, that their minds man and a doctor at the same time : seemed to be chained to their bodies,' from the first there will flow a thick which is the most mameful fort blood; resembling inflammatory blood, of servitude: nor can he be said almost folid, and of a deep red; the to be either a lover of virtue or blood of the second will be either of a of learning, who connot pursue his faint red, or without any colour, soft, studies if he be obliged to wait a little gelatinous, and will almost entirely longer than usual for his meals, if he turn to water. Your blood therefore, has not lept quite enough, or if the men of learning, Mould not be disa air be too hot or too cold.

solved, but brought to a conlistence ; I have hitherto spoke only of fo. and you Mould in general be moderate lid food; liquors are not to be for- in the article of drinking, and cautigotten. In the last age a grievous era ously avoid warm liquors. ror crept into physic, that health is Amongst the favourite beverages of the better, the more fuid the blood the learned, the worit is the infusion is; and by the advice of Bontekoe of that famous leaf; lo well known by chiefly, a pernicious custom prevailed the name of tea, which, to our great of drinking, warm liquors both night detriment, has every year, for these and day, whereby the human species two centuries past, been constantly imhas greatly suffered, and those of the pre- ported from China and Japan. This fent age sorely lament the injury which most pernicious gift first destroys the their forefathers sustained in the last, by strength of the stomach, and, if it be impairing the strength of their nerves. not loon laid aside, equally destroys

Grave authors, who knew better, that of the viscera, the blood, the and chiefly the illustrious Duncan, nerves, and of the whole body; so with Boerhaave, and the whole school that malignant and all chronical dirof Leyden, have proscribed this error; orders will appear to increase, especiand, if they have not reformed the ally nervous disorders, in proportion abuse, have at least greatly checked it. as the use of tea becomes common : But inolt valetudinarians itill lie under and you may easily form a judgment the same prepostession, and, looking from the diseases that prevail in every upon an over thick blood as the source country, whether the inhabitants of it of their disorder, have recourse to are lovers of tea, or the contrary. How warm beverages, which others reject. happy would it be for Europe, if by It can scarce be believed, how many unanimous consent the importation of disorders proceed from this source: this infamous leaf were prohibited, and I will take upon me to affert, that which is endued only with a corrosive those pernicious bowls, overflowing force, derived from the acrimony of with warm liquors, are the true box of the gum with which it is pregnant : Pandora, without even hope remain- for experience thews, that what it has ing at the bottom; for they are pro. of an astringent principle is lost in the lific fources of hypochrondriac melan- warm water. (See p. 297.) choly, which both adds strength to I will not pals the same censure, and is itself one of the worst of disor- though I must pass some censure, upon

It was justly observed by Theophrastus, that to eat mucb, and to live upon flesh, deprives men of their reason, blunts the faculties of their minds, and renders tbem dull and stupid,

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