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induced me to speak with unguarded warmth... I bope this is not a crime. parlsa nec sdi 0,30112; brwdard ileqaonaqe 4.3 2018 Tyroscenda"quidem, scitewt'stighoseere Cretidsels girib: be en 97971 w 8 10 gedod.

-sysiocis, o join On the occasion when shu used the expression in the heart,

is sick," &c. (which seems to have sin effect upon this

gentleman like :. that of the words of Catolupon doba Dennis, in Pope's disingenuous account of this poisoniug.) trust the reader will remember, that the passage which excited this expression, though it was not in Spence, as now appears to be the case, was gyyted as coming from the same store houses of gossip, which contained sigilar reflections on various other characters. He wilhremember I had not seen Spence's Anecdotes, and could not bave seen them and I could only write from the authority before mer;y and if Hughes, of whom Pore had spoken socordially and kindly beføre, as stated in the same book, to have shared the common obloqux with others egually resrestable, and that the language of such disrespect came from Pope himself, weavied with seeing and seeing nodling else than these contradictionsvasidy albuiginenis under the authority of Spencer might

I naturally enough exclaim-Neither friend or foe, we spared basin, Isi I rejoice to find I was mistaken ; and havwg. now read Spence's Anecdotes entive, that which seemned so revolting whey all the little scandal? wasy it may say, e compounded in the unfavourable extracts, band mo "uselief 1/(does, he understaud this word, of Jively and good-naturedelanecdote attorded, such as now: appears when the book is takeo all together, I confess, ingenuously the hasty watmthe with which I spokedin 297116enguo tudi otot baisla 1 ", ,

He has hiade the most of it, andu 80 let him. Haying, spoken of Spenceyi perhaps I may give a momentary," relief" to the irksoreness of self-defence, by mentioning a few çircumstauces relating to him, which even this writer may not know. He says, very Justly, that there bwas a 4 moral doveliness in the character and life of Spencedly The Bishop of London (Louis), the Rey. MER

Mr. Rolle, rector of Berwick, Wilts, near Shaftesbury, Ridley, the quthor of the Tales of the Genü, and a relation, of whom I bave spoken in the Vindíciæ Wykehamicæ, were all school-fellows at Winchester logether; and kept up the most friendly intercourse as long as they lived. The Rev. Wmi Bowles, the rector of Lower Donhead, lived within three miles of Rolle, who had a college-living, now. in the possession of the Rey. R. Bingham, The mild countegance, and encouraging, playful, but gentle manners of Rolle,

Rolle, yet remember, having often seen him when a child at my father's house,

. Spence, the critic observes, is described in the Tales of the Genii as "the Dervise of the Groves." Perhaps he might not be aware, that

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se name « Plesoi Ecnebs; the name of the Dervise is that of JoSEPA SPENCE spelt backward; Ellor, in the same tale, is“ Rolle," being also his name sspelt backawards a Spence was very often a resi

a dent at the parsonage-house of Berwick, where his school-fellow Rolle died, without any other preferments the sole survivor of his knot of friends, some in retired life, some of them illustrious characters, but all marked by the same vivtaes; the same gentle mannersthe retired Clergyman, the hearted phrélateş ahe elegant and classical scholar, and the

author of those Taleslof vich Eastern imagery.u hich are so popular at this day. 926) would alequest those who are hostile to our public sehools; to contemplate this groupes not as saccomplished scholars, merély, mbat as virtuous ands ámiable menggin different stations of life, bound together by the tost affectionate intercourse, which begandwhen

they were nursed upou tlae self-same hill A straight walk of brick washnade fon Spence near tbe bøuse, in the garden at Berwick, where he might wall backward and forwards withouT'SOTLING HIS SHO ESU The old parsonage is taken down, "But this walk, saered by such remembrances, dyet nemains, and I hope will long remain, as one memorial on the spot,cof such friends, now gone 10 their last "rest together. elxs igions yllar

My father being executors to the relation I have mentioned, his bapers, of course, came mto the executoris possession, anstata ime when I little thought of standing at the bar, as I may call it, of

, cálb public. I had often, in early life) donused myself jas looking into some old entertaining letters, which were the correspondence of Spence in his younger days, with his school-fellowood The letters related to familiar circumstances, with anecdotes of careless Collegelife, and were more interesting to me when I considered them as written by the author of the superb Polimetis,lipomy father's library. 29 All those letters, which I should now bel glad to find, are lost or destroyed. word 10T VETES 19111n žids 1979 doinwegint of

Whilst I am writing this, I almost sfeel as if I had had a kind of friendly trice with my critical antagonist--at alllevents, he may accept the addition as endeavouring To show him what is the meaning of relief, an'expression which may be as dark to him, as “ the dreams of a Muggletonian !!"3198 esimedey W suit

This sort of episodē,' I can trulyo affirm, has been some“ relief to me, but we must buckle on our harness,'Hand again to the dusty field.ssllog & bsi odnello I to askime 997 di distrik

Having spoken of these examples of the virtues and talents derived from a public school ; having set before him this knot” of academical friends, I think this a proper place to ask the Critic what he means by talking of my bEXULTING OVER THE POET who had not the happiness of an ACADEMICAL LIFE? Mr. Bowles

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seems to have indulged in a SORT of SPLENETIC PLEASURE!!”. Have I EXULTED ?-indulged in a sort of SPLENETIC PLEASURE?

R! gril now bufon}" SDA 20 What can I do, how can Iuguard myself als Now, so far from “EKULTING 'Isover Pope'si waqt of a more liberal education, I introduced the circumstahoelofur education so confined as his, to show that whatever was faulty in his character, as to irritable temper, or self-love, ivabroving to unavoidable moral causes ; that his heart was not to blame, as under the same disadvantages, and the inevitable' operation of the osume causes, the best of characters by nature would have been subject to the same infirmities."

So“ that when I meant to praise,he says, " I bite!!* A sincere, and upright heart dould never draw such an bpimon from words.lwhiobfıb verily believe, can be only so understood by wilful perverseness. Here they are in his face ! Pu01911sy but 1201U

“ If these and other parts of his character appear less amiable, let the reader constantly keepan mind the physical and moral causes, which operated on a mind dike his. Let him remember his life,

one long diverseshis CONFINED education, entrusted chiefly to those who were themselves narrow-minded his belog used to listen to the voice, from his cradle, of tenderness, almost maternal, in all who łcontemplated his weakness and incipient talents.. When he has weighed these things, and ATTENDED TO EyERY ALLEVIATING CIRCUMSTANCE that his knowledge of the world, or his OHARITY may isuggest then let him not hastily condemu what truth compels me to ostatę; but let him rather, without presuming on his own vir tues, lanrept the imperfections of our common nature, and leave the judgmentita clim, who knoweth "whereof we are made !!! 9mit

Reader, is this EXULTING over Pope's confined éducation! Speak honestly, Mr. Gifford, the man comes under your auspices. not the daring and deliberate fall on and rather is

" pássage in 1 Pope's favor studiously omitteda proof that there are those who shut one eye and see things distorted with the other? Have I not reason to complain of this Critic, who will not un

do for as there is no one 8O BLIN D as those who will NOT see, so vone are so obtuse to understand, as those who from their prejudices WLD NOT$2911ss id moldt i flt

“ I complain! siagain, probably as ineffectually as beforeOne eminent poet, when I solnetines spoke of these things, "and particularly of the letter to Campbell, constantly answered, "IT WILL ALL COME RIGHT." A Dorsetsbire squire, speaking to a prosing neighbour, “ Pray, Mr. do you MEAN and so ?" On the other's replying, "Oh no, quite the contrary." "Nay, Sir, you

" MUST MEAN this, if you

MEAN ANY THING!" So I may say,

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“two and two make four," till my heart aches, if thus the plainest expressions are insultingly turned against me, and it is pronounced that I must mean,

“ two and two make five!!” Thus, when I admitted that much, if not all, that was faulty iu Pope's temper, arose fram 1pbysical and moral causes, I am represented as exulting!"nbl only thank the writer's candor for not adding that"I EXULTED''because the person of Pope was diminutive, apd his HEALTH WEAK!! I wonder how much more I should have exulled ' cf belt had been born with a tail!But even his "inpocent years' cannot disarm my critic's bostility.

“ Mr. Bowles has fixed on these innocent years as the groundwork of an HYPOTHESIS ás ungenerous as unjust!" Eage! what a detestable monster must Mr. Bowles bem An hypothesis as ungenerous as unjusti” Mr. Bowles is mainly ignorant" what this unjust and ungenerous hypothesis is.i jin yadt 9oll .22901481917

Now we shall bear! utrcurso ridio eta sodio bus sed il »

On the wellknown incident of Pope's father encouraging his boy's shimes, and these thiimesi finding afterwards other friends more skilful critics than the retired merchant, he thus declaimisto 79. Pope being tenderly brought up, was, through-life, impatient of contradiction, scarcely brooking a dissenting voice and having been fogtered by early patronage, lived afterwards in the sunshine of flattery. The same disposition that made him, vain, would in other circumstances have caused depression !!"eid to el Such, it is added, is the discovery of Mr. Bowles and this marvellouš I discovery, and this " hypothesis," are pronounced UNGENEROUS and UNJUST! I have read this passage over ten times; 'I profess, in sincere simplicity of heart, I cannot understand, how what I have said is." any hypothesis ;" why it should be a discovery” stand still less how this!" hypothesis and discoyery, can be thoughtif ungenerous on unjust!it did they

It was a common observation founded on my own views of life and character. Generally speaking, I think, a young person brought up as Pope was, would be impatient of contradiction, scarcely brooking ia dissenting voice ;t and I think i also, without any ideas of discovery or hypothesis, that if such a young person in early life, met great encouragement in the world, he would become vain ; if he had, from his earliest years, received great encourage

l ment at home, and received from the world, into which, he advanced, everything the contrary, I think the same mind would naturally. tall into DESPONDENCE !! “ Provincial and moralthis gentleman imagines me, and as much a prey to forlorn Monboddo believe in

being a .

tails, the critic had not said I had “SURMISED" one to Pope.

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reveries, as Lord Monboddo, who believed men had originally "tails, or poor parson." Tasker

" Devonshire, I have seen enough of lifegato have atten

Sitio West

of this example.

bseaseanq 1979 neaibb Atsdt, evena I confess, isha ubink Pope aids was

$auppatient

of contradiction

spelhos through life,” I coyfess. I think he scarcely could brook a dissenting voiceland I knowwif he lived is the sunshine know also, n't he was vainggo

or he must bave been a prodigy, if with so many indulgences and so brought po he had been otherwise, . And this general sentiments which is exaked into an hypothesis which was adduced more to accounts for some parts of Pope's character, than to arraign them, comes out to be ungenerous, las unjustaqwhich, falls upon, Pope'seni mfant, and iunocent years. Argint (abitual of becognoiempito Now, I repeae (NOT WITH "ccultation Sehat, if Pope had

,

jf had a more liberal education, he would have been more free from that vanity, which so often accompanies a combined one, no

done, no 19", isdT As to his being impatient

of contradiction scarcely

10 buss brooking a dissenting voice," od have before spokey of the circum

I stance of his resentment atqhe high praise given in

"Guardian to Phillips's Pastoral ; can the Critic, deny this, or the stratagem

?
employed to introduce into the Guardian, his ironical decision
in favor of Phillips Dennis also had not injured him, but Den-
nis, sat that time considered no indifferent critic, anong so many
voices that hailed the young Pastoral

Poet, wa
was silent.

Some cause of iishis sort, urged him to introduce the i Reddening Appius into the Essay on Criticism, or else the attack was as nkind as it was unprovoked. Upon this subject I must revert to Addison... The Reviewer says, 'qoribb A od jog pluog soit

lenkt If jealousy, the infirmity of genius, existed between the parties, it could not be on the side of Pope. Addison's true fame rests sonhis Spectators and Pope never for one instant could contemplate a rival in the verse of Addison ! noiempos yua

idi, , Suppose, he could not what of that? could he not " scarcely

, brooking a dissenting voice, feel it like a wound, when Addison, so eminent in literature, did not appear to applaud as he expected, his happiest invention in the Rape of the Lock. Addison might be as sincere, when he objected to the proposed machinery

of the

ci Sylphs, as he was when he recommended Cato as fit for the closet and not the stage Be it as it may, because Addison did not approve the introduction of the machinery" to the Rape of the Lock, calling it. Merum Sal, without it, Pope attributed the cause instantly, to jealousy !1sForbWarburton says, :he wa shocked for his friend, and TREN DEGAN

FIRST to OPEN HIS Eyest o his (Addison's) character." Sub e visita di sangat

HOWS: 03 9d

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