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and festivity in his habitation under ground. It is a very kind and wise dispensation of Providence, that every part of the world is rendered the most agreeable to those who live in it.

Now, little Mary, what have you to say ?

Mary. I have only to say, that if they were to offer to carry me away from home, I would scratch their

eyes out!

Mr. B. Well said, my girl! stand up for yourself. Let nobody run away with youagainst your will.

Mary. That I won't.

NINTH EVENING.

THE FARM YARD JOURNAL.

DEAR TOM,

ŞINCE we parted at the breaking up, I have been for most of the time at a pleasant farm in Hertfordshire, where I have employed myself in rambling about the country and assisting, as well as I could, in the work going on at home and in the fields. On wet days, and in the evenings, I have amused myself with keeping a journal of all the great events that have happened among us; and hoping that when you are tired of the bustle of your busy town, you may receive some entertainment from comparing our transactions with yours, I have copied out for your perusal one of the days in my memorandum book.

Pray let me know in return what you are doing, and believe me,

Your very affectionate friend,

RICHARD MARKWELL.

Hazel-Farm.

JOURNAL.

June 10th. Last night we had a dreadful alarm. A violent scream was heard from the hen-roost; the

geese

all set up a cackle, and the dogs barked. Ned, the boy who lies over the stable, jumped up, and ran into the yard, when he observed a fox galloping away with a chicken in his mouth, and the dogs in full chase after him. They could not overtake him, and soon returned. Upon further examination, the large white cock was found lying on the ground all bloody, with his comb torn almost off, and his feathers all ruffled, and the speckled hen and three chickens lay dead beside him. The cock recovered, but appeared terribly frightened. It

seems that the fox had jumped over the garden hedge, and then crossing part of the yard behind the straw, had crept into the hen-roost through a broken pale. John the carpenter was sent for, to make all fast, and prevent the like misehief again.

Early this morning the brindled cow was delivered of a fine bull calf. Both are likely to do well. The calf' is to be fattened for the butcher.

The duck-eggs that were sitten upon by the old black hen were hatched this day, and the ducklings all directly ran into the pond, to the great terror of the hen, who went round and round, clucking with all her might in order to call them out, but they did not regard her. An old drake took the little ones under his care, and they swam about very merrily.

As Dolly this morning was milking the new cow that was bought at the fair,

she kicked with her hind-legs, and threw down the milk pail, at the same time knocking Dolly off her stool into the dirt. For this offence the cow was sentenced to have her head fastened to the rack, and her legs tied together.

A kite was observed to hover a long while over the yard with an intention of carrying off some of the young chickens, but thehens called their broods together under their wings, and the cocks put themselves in order of battle, so that the kite was disappointed. At length one chicken, not minding its mother, but straggling heedlessly to a distance, was descried by the kite, who made a sudden swoop, and seized it in his talons. The chicken cried out, and the cocks and hens all screamed; when lp Rha the fariner's son, who saw the attack, snatched up a loaded gun, and just as the kite was flying off with his prey fired and brought him dead to the

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