Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual service, in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject, for the same offence, to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall be compelled, in any criminal case, to be a witness against himself; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

ART. VI.-In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been commitied, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favour; and to have the assistance of counsel for his defence.

ART. VII.-In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved; and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any coure of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

ART. VIII.-Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

ART. IX.-The enumeration in the constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

ART. X.-The powers not delegated to the United States by the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.

ART. XI.-The judicial power of the United States shall not be con strued to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecute! against one of the United States, by citizens of another state, or by citi. zens or subjects of any foreign state.

ART. XII.-1. The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for president and vice-president, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name, in their ballots, the person voted for as president, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as vice-president; and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as president, and of all persons voted for as vice-president, and of the number of votes for each, which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of government of the United States, directed to the president of the senate; the president of the senate shall, in the presence of the senate and house of represent. atives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted: the person having the greatest number of votes for president shall be the president, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers, not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as president, the house of representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the president. But in choosing the president, the vole shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote: a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. And if the house of representatives shall not choose a president, whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the vico president shall act as president, as in the case of the death, or other constitutional debility, of the president.

2. The person having the greatest number of votes as vice-president shall be the vice-president, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list the senate shall choose the vice-president: a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of senators and a majority of thn whole number shali be necessary to a choice

[blocks in formation]

3. But no person consututionally ineligible to the office of president shall be eligible to that of vice president of the United States.

Art. XIII.-If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive, or retain any title of nobility or honour, or shall, without the consent of congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office, or einolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince, or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profil under them, or either of them.

The following Table gives a View of the absolute and relative Popula tion of the States and Territories in 1830; of the Number of the different Classes of the Population; of the Rate of Increase from 1826 to 1830; and of the Area and Number of Representatives of each State in the Federal Congress.

States and Ter Area ritories.

sq. m.

Free
Whites.

col'red.

Slaves.

Total.

Rate of Pop. per No. of increase. sq. m. Repre.

5

Maine
33,200 399,263 1,192

399,955 N. Hampshire, 9,490 268,721 607

269.328 Vermont, 10,000 279,771 681

33.9
10.3
19.
16.65
17.

12
28
27
81
73
62
42
30
44
36
30
398
18
15
18
8
0.8
6
3

290.652 Massachusetts, 7,800 603,359 7,049

610,408
Rhode Island, 1,225 93,621 3,561 17 97,199
Conuecticut, 4,764 289,603 8,047 25 297.675
New York, 46,000 1,868,061 44,870 75 1,918,608*
Pennsylvania, 46,000|1,309,900 37,930 4031|1,348,233
New Jersey, 7,276 300,266 18,303 2,2541| 320,823
Delaware, 2,100 57,691 15,855 3,292 76,748
Maryland, 13,500 291,108 52,938 102.994 447,040
Dist. of Col.,
100 27,563 6,152

6,119 39,834 Virginia, 70,000 694,300 47,348 469,757 1,211,405 N. Carolina, :

50,000 472,843 19,543 245,601 737,997 S. Carolina,

33.000 257,863 7,921 315,401 581,185 Georgia, 62,000 296,806 2,486 217,531 516,823 Florida Ter., 55,000 18,385 844 15,501 34,730 Alabama, 50,000 190, 106 1,572 117,549 309,527 Mississippi, 46,000 70,443 519 65,659 136,621 Louisiana, 48.200 89,231 16,710 109,588 215,7393 Tennessee, 45,000 535,746 4,555 141,603 651,904 Kentucky,

40.500 517,787 4,917 165,213 687,917 Ohio, 44,000 928,329 9,576

937,903 Indiana, 36,000 339,399 3,632

343,031 Illinois, 53,500 155,061 2,384

157,445 Michigan, 54,000 ?

7

87,27311 Missouri, 66,000 114,795 569 25,091 140,455 Arkansas, 54,000

25,671

141 9,6292 58,1341 Winonsin T., 1300,0001

30,000**

8.15 39.36 28.5 15.6 5.5 9.74 20.1 13.7 15.5 15.6 51.56

21
13
9
9
0
5

142.
81.
40.6
62.
21.9
6).
133.
185.2

3 13 13 19 7

15
17
21
10
3
2
2
1
(21

111.

# Including 5,602 not regularly returned. # It appears that the actual number of slaves in Pennsylvania was only 67, the number h given including indented apprentices. Every child born after 1804 is free.

Including 210 not regularly returned Population in 1835. 1 Population in 1935.

** Population in 1835

CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE.

.

.

(The figures on the right hand refer to the page of the history on which an amount

of each event referred to may be found.) fear

Page 1 192 Columbus discovers the New World

12 1197 The Cabots discover the Continent of North America :

14 1-499 Vespucci's voyage with Ojeda

14 1501 Voyage of Cortereal

14 1512 Juan Ponce de Leon discovers Florida

17 1523 Verraza ni explores the American coast

15 1525 Narvaez attempts the conquest of Florida .

18 1531 Jaques Cartier sails up the St. Lawrence

15 1539 Ferdinand de Soto commences the conquest of Florida

19 1511 Soto discovers the Mississippi river

20 1502 Ribault leaves a French colony on the coast of Florida

21 1561 Laudonniere begins a French settlement on the river May 21 1565 Laudonniere's colony destroyed by the Spaniards

22 St. Augustine, the oldest town in the United States, founded by Pedro Melendez

22 1568 The Spanish colony on the river May destroyed by De Gourgues

22 1576 Frobisher's expedition :

23 1579 First voyage of Sir Humphrey Gilbert

23 1581 Raleigh's first expedition sent to Carolina commanded by Amidas and Barlow

21 1603 Gosnold's voyage to New England

26 1603 First permanent French settlement in North America made at Port Royal

16 ! 606 First charter of Virginia issued

29 1607 Jamestown in Virginia founded; the earliest permanent English settlement in North America

30 1608 Quebec seuled by Champlain

16 1609 Henry Hudson discovers the Hudson river.

79 Second charter of Virginia granted

33 1610 The starving time in Virginia

34 :611 Sir Thomas Dale arrives in Virginia

35 1613 New York settled by the Dutch

79 1619 First General Assembly in Virginia

37 1620 Landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth.

53 1621 Charter granted to the Dutch West India Company for settling

the territory between the Connecticut and the Delaware 80 1622 Patent granted to Gorges and Mason by the Plymouth Company

56 1623 Portsinouth and Dover settled by Gorges and Mason:

56 Albany settled by the Dutch.

80 1624 Dissolution of the London Company

40 16:27 The Swedes setile on the Delaware, and call their colony New Sweden

96 16:30 Heath's pateni for Carolina granted 1931 Clayborne forms a settlement on Kent Island Windsor in Connecticut settled

62 1633 Maryland settled by Lord Baltimore

The Dutch settle at Hartford 1634 Banishment of Roger Williams

60 Representative form of government first adopted in New 'Eng

land 1635 Saybrook settled by John Winthrop :

353

30*

Pagy

.

.

Dutch

3

APPENDIX. Year 1636 Mr. Hooker emigrates from Massachusetts to Connecticut 63 1637 Pequod war

61 1638 New Haven settled

66 1641 New Hampshire annexed to Massachusetts 1013 Confederation of the New England colonies

66 1614 Roger Willian.s obtains a charter for Rhode Island

66 1630 Connecticut abandoned by the Dutch

81 1651 Virginia capitulates to the parliament

41 Risingh takes Fort Casimir from the Dutch

81 1655 Stuyvesant, the Dutch governor of, New York, conquers New Sweden

81 L660 Charles II proclaimed in Virginia

41 Arrival of the regicides Whalley and Goffe in Boston

69 1663 Lord Clarendon obtains a charter for Carolina.

103 1664 Commissioners sent to New England to regulate the colonies 71 New York taken from the Dutch by the English

81 Charles II grants to the Duke of York a patent for the country from the Delaware to the Connecticut

81 The Duke of York grants New Jersey to Berkeley and Car:

81 1670 Port Royal in South Carolina setiled by Governor Sàyle : 106 1671 Charleston settled

108 1673 New York re-conquered by ihe

82 1674 New York restored to the English at the treaty of Westminster 82 1675 Commencement of King Philip's war

72 1676 Bacon's rebellion in Virginia

44 Death of King Philip.

72 Maine purchased by Massachusetts

72 1681 First representative assembly in New Jersey

94 Penn receives a charter for Pennsylvania

98 1682 Philadelphia founded

99 1684 Colonel Dongan and Lord Effingham's treaty with the Five Nations

81 1685 Charles II dies, and is succeeded by James II 1686 Sir Edmund Andros appointed president of New England 73 1687 Andros attempts to deprive Connecticut of its charter 1688 New York and New Jersey added to the jurisdiction of An: dros

81 Revolution in England, which gives the sovereignty to Wil.

74 1689 Andros deposed and imprisoned, and William and Mary proclaimed at Boston

74 Jacob Leisler usurps the government of New York :

83 War on the Canada border. Port Royal in Nova Scotia taken

from the French 1691 Colonel Sloughter appointed governor of New York:

87 Leisler deposed and executed

89 1194 Culture of rice introduced into South Carolina

105 1997 Peace of Ryswick

75 1701 Penn grants a new charter to Pennsylvania

101 Lord Cornbury appointed governor of New York

89 1702 War with France and Spain

73 Expedition against St. Augustine

. 11C War on the Canada border

75 1706 Unsuccessful attack of the Spaniards on Charleston 1711 Unsuccessful invasion of Canada

76 1712 War in North Carolina with the Tuscarora and Coree Indiang 105 1715 War of the Yemassees

110 1729 North and South Carolina separated

105 1732 General Oglethorpe obtains a charter for Georgia 1733 General Oglethorpe colonises Georgia

112 1740 Oglethorpe besieges St. Augustine

114

.

. 110

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

Par

120

[ocr errors]

. 132

.

· 131
. 136
. 136

141

143
· 111

.

1742 .nvasion of Georgia by the Spaniards successfully resisied
1714 War between France and England

72
17-15 Louisbourg taken .
1718 Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle

78
1732 Charter of Georgia surrendered to the king
1751 Commencement of the old French War

113
Congress of Delegates from seven colonies meet at Albany 119
1753 Nova Scotia conquered by the British.

119
Defeat of General Braddock
1756 War formally declared between France and England

121
Fort Oswego taken by Montcalm

1.22
1757 Fort William Henry taken by Montcalm :
1733 Forts Du Quesne and Frontignac taken by the English 124
1:59 Quebec laken. General Wolse killed

1:26
1765 Stamp acı passed.

1:28
First Continental Congress meets at New York

129
1766 Stamp act repealed

130
1768 Boston garrisoned by British troops
1770 Boston massacre

133
1772 Affair of the schooner Gaspee
1773 Tea destroyed in Boston
1774 Boston Port bill passed
Continental Congress assembles at Philadelphia

144
1775 April 19 Battle of Lexington and Concord

May Ticonderoga and Crown Point taken
June 17 Washington appointed commander in chief
Battle of Breed's Hill

. 145
Nov. 19 Montreal taken

149
Dec. 31 Allack on Quebec deseated. Montgomery killed
1776 March 17 Boston evacuated by the British

• 150
. 118
· 151

June 28 Attack on Charleston defeated
July 4 Declaration of Independence

151
Aug. 26 Americans defeated on Long Island

1.17
Sept. 15 New York occupied by the British

139
Oct.
29 Battle of White Plains.

159
Nov. Retreat of Washington through New Jersey

160
Dec. 26 Battle of Trenton .
1777 Jan. 2 Battle of Princeton

ibs
Arrival of La Fayette

163
Arrival of Burgoyne

173
July Ticonderoga taken by Burgoyne's troops

174
Capture of General Prescott

169
General Howe leaves New York, and sails with 16,000
men for the south

170
Aug. .6 Battle of Bennington

177
Sept. 11 Battle of Brandywine

170
18 Congress leaves Philadelphia

171
19 Battle of Stillwater

179
26 Philadelphia aacupied by the British .

171
Oct. 4 Battle of Germantown .

171
7 Second battle of Stillwater

180
12 Surrender of Burgoyne

181
22 Battle of Redbank

172
Nov, 15 Articles of confederation of the United Staies ratsiej 165
Dec. 11 Washington retires to Valley Forge

173
* 778
Treaty between France and the United States :

183
May Retreat of Barren Hill.

183
June 18 The British evacuate Philadelphia :
28 Battle of Monmouth

1
July Arrival of Count D'Estaing with a French fleet 197

Massacre at Wyoming .
Aug. Unsuccessful attempt to recover

Rhode Isini 187

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »