Page images
PDF
EPUB

The importance and blessings of Union Jay 341 Section 4. Danger of War between the States

Section 5. Subject continued
Section 6. Character of Moses

Section 7. The Force of Talents
Section 8. Washington's speech to the first Congress 354
Section 9. Extracts from Washington's Farewell

357

PART III.

Pieces in Poetry.

General Rules for Reading Poetry.

CHAPTER I.

Narrative Pieces.

[ocr errors]

363

Section 1. Verses, the sound of which is an Echo to the
Sense
Section 2. Othello's Apology
Section 3. Discourse between Adam and Eve Milton 367

Shakspeare 365

CHAPTER II.

Didactic Pieces.

Section 1. Nothing formed in Vain

Section 2. National Prejudices and Slavery
Section 3. Reflections on a Future State
Section 4. On Versification
Section 5. On Pride

CHAPTER III.

Hamilton 343 ib. 345 Dwight 348 352

[ocr errors]

Descriptive Pieces.

Section 1. The Morning in Summer
Section 2. The Sabbath Morning

361

Thompson 370
Cowper 371
Thompson 372

Pope 373
ib. 375

[graphic]

Thompson 376
Sabbath 377

Section 3. A Paraphrase on 13th. ch. of 1st. Corinth. 378 Section 4. An Improved Imagination, &c.

Akenside 380

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

DISSERTATION

ON

ORATORICAL DELIVERY.

Part I.

Reading, Recitation, Declamation, and Oratory.

THE general objects of public speaking are, instruction, persuasion, or entertainment. These objects are sometimes kept distinct, sometimes they are combined in various proportions.

In their various modes of exercise, these objects will attain their ends, that is, succeed in influencing the hearer in the degree proposed, not only by the interesting matter which may be presented to him, but also by the manner in which it is presented. The manner is called the delivery. And the advantages of good delivery are such, as to conceal in some degree the blemishes of the composition, or the matter delivered, and to add lustre to its beauties; in so much, that a good composition, well delivered, shall, with any popular audience, succeed better in its object, whether that be instruction, persuasion, or entertainment, than a superior composition not delivered so well.

The modes adopted in public speaking are, reading, recitation, declamation, oratory, and acting. Of which, the three first are often practised for the purpose of exercise or preparation, as well as on real oc casions.

B

Section 4. Erskine against Williams, publisher of Paine's Age of Reason 258 Section 5. On the Character of a Judge Martin 257 Section 6. Burr and Blennerhasset Wirt 253

263

266

269

275

278

Section 7. Erskine against Demosthenes
Section 8. Emmet's Vindication

Section 9. Griffin against Cheetham for a Libel
Another part of the same Speech
Section 10. Cicero's Oration against Verres

[ocr errors]

CHAPTER III.

Eloquence of the Pulpit.

Section 1. Remarks on Pulpit Eloquence
Section 2. The Commandments
Section 3. Nathan's Parable

Section 4. Parable of the Prodigal Son
Section 5. The Atheist, his attainments, &c.
Section 6. The Omnipresence of the Deity
Section 7. The Liberty of Man and the Fore-Knowledge
of God Horsley 296

Section 8. Character and Government of God Mason 298
Section 9. Divinity of Jesus Christ
Section 10. Sufferings of our Saviour

Section 11. Pure religion and genuine devotion
Section 12. Transition from Time to Eternity
Section 13. Early Piety

ib. 301
Jay 305
Fawcet 308
Logan 310

ib. 311 Blair 313

Section 14. Devotion a source of Happiness
Section 15. Reflections on God as our Creator Fawcet 315
Section 16. Triumph of Life and Death
Section 17. Domestic Happiness

Section 18. On Patience

Section 19. Christianity a Practical Principle

CHAPTER IV.

[ocr errors]

Select Speeches.

Section 1. On Prejudice

Section 2. Disquisition on Patriotism
Section 3. Burke's Eulogy on his Son

[ocr errors]

283

287

288

289

Foster 290

ib. 292

[graphic]

Zolicofer 319
Jay 324

ib. 327

Hannah Moore 330

Dexter 335

337

339

The importance and blessings of Union Jay 341 Section 4. Danger of War between the States

Hamilton 343
ib. 345
Dwight 348

352

Section 7. The Force of Talents
Section 8. Washington's speech to the first Congress 354
Section 9. Extracts from Washington's Farewell

357

PART III.

Pieces in Poetry.

General Rules for Reading Poetry.

Section 5. Subject continued
Section 6. Character of Moses

CHAPTER I.

Narrative Pieces.

Section 1. Verses, the sound of which is an Echo to the
Sense

363

Section 2. Othello's Apology
Section 3. Discourse between Adam and Eve Milton 367

Shakspeare 365

[ocr errors]

CHAPTER II.

Didactic Pieces.

Section 1. Nothing formed in Vain

Section 2. National Prejudices and Slavery
Section 3. Reflections on a Future State

Section 4. On Versification
Section 5. On Pride

[ocr errors]

CHAPTER III.

Descriptive Pieces.

361

Thompson 370
Cowper 371
Thompson 372

Pope 373
ib. 375

Section 1. The Morning in Summer
Section 2. The Sabbath Morning
Section 3. A Paraphrase on 13th. ch. of 1st.
Section 4. An Improved Imagination, &c.

Thompson 376
Sabbath 377
Corinth. 378
Akenside 380

[ocr errors]
« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »