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Addison's, ii. 124; Savage's excel-

lence in, 417.
Cooper, Anthony Ashley, Earl of

Shaftesbury, i. 393.
Cooper, the miniature painter, a

friend of Butler's, i. 200.
Cooper's Hill, Denham's poem, i. 78,

84; quoted, 85; criticised, 36.
Corbet, Mrs., epitaph on, iii. 202-

203; the best of Pope's epitaphs,

203.
“ Corinna,”Curll's, Mrs. Thomas, her

“wild story ” of Dryden's funeral,

i. 406.
Coriolanus, a tragedy by Thomson,

performed after his death for the

benefit of his family, iii. 231.
Coronation, Dryden's poem on the,

quoted, i. 442.
Cotton, Ann, wife of Sir J. Denbam,

i. 78.
Couplet, Pope's favourite, iii. 192.
Courage rightly successful. Dryden

on “ the brave bold man,” i. 475.
Coverley, Sir Roger de, Addison's

conception of, ii, 105.
Coward. Rochester's saying, “Every-

one would be a coward if he durst,”

i. 224.
Cowley, Abraham, Life of, i. 1-21;

his genius and character, 22-27;
critical remarks on his works, 27-
73; birth, 3; education, 4-6; pre-
cocity, 5; Comedies, 6, 7, 17;
Davideis written, 6; criticised, 56-
64; ejected from Cambridge he
retreats to Oxford, 7; follows the
Queen to Paris, 8; The Mistress
published, 8; criticised, 48; Let-
ters, 10; consults the Virgilian
lots, 11; thinks of retiring to
America, 12; becomes a physician,
13, 15; assists at commencement
of Royal Society, 15; Latin poems,

15, 16; calls himself “the Melan-
choly Cowley," 18 ; introduced
into the Session of the Poets, 18;
house in Chertsey, 19, 20; death,
21; portraits of, 5, 21; his proposi-
tion for the advancement of ex-
perimental philosophy, 109; could
have made his name illustrious
merely by his learning, 431; Den-
ham's poem on the death of, 83,
87; bis Will, 501 ; leaves his

books to Sprat, 502.
Cowper, quoted on the music of

Paradise Lost, i. 194.
Cradock, Dr. Zachary, his famous

sermon, i. 279.
Craggs, James, the friend of Addi-

son, Pope, and Gay, ü. 122 ;
Secretary of State, 247 ; his pro-
posal to obtain a pension for
Pope, iii. 91; Pope's epitaph on,

200-201.
Crashaw, addresses Cowley on the

appearance of Poetical Blossoms, i,
5; Cowley's verses on his death

one of the best of his poems, 46.
Crawley, Francis, Judge. Waller's

speech on his impeachment, i. 260.
Creation, Blackmore's fine philosophi-

cal poem, ii, 228, 240.
Credulity, Juvenal's saying, there

is nothing a man will not believe

in his own favour,” iii. 120.
Creechy, Thomas, his translation of

Juvenal, i. 463.
Crispe, Sir Nicholas, his design to

assist the king, i. 266, 267.
Critic, Addison considered as a, ii.

150-152.
Criticism, improvement in since

Addison's time, i. 177; instance of
sagacious, 332; Dryden the Father
of English, 425; Pope's willing-
ness to listen to, iii. 167.

Croft, Herbert, his “ Life of Young,"

ii. 295-341 ; criticised by Burke,

341.
Cromwell, Cowley's verses on death

of, i. 13, 14; his intimacy with
Waller, 274; Dryden's Heroic

Stansas on, 353, 439.
Cromwell, Mr. Henry, his account of

Gay's farce, ii. 260; called by

Gay, “ honest and hatless,” ii. 69.
Crousaz, Jean Pierre de, his attack

on Pope, iii. 127.
Customs, Dryden made collector of,

i. 422.
Cutlers, the Polish, and the Scotch

settlers, i. 506.
Cutter of Coleman Street, Cowley's

Comedy of The Guardian repro-
duced under that name, i. 17.

Dacier, Madame, ber French Homer

translated into English, iii. 88.
“ Dalilahs of the Theatre,” Dryden's

name for bursts of extravagance,

i. 476.
Damask cloths bearing representa-

tions of victories over the Turks, i.

506.
Darkness, Hymn to, Yalden's, ii. 290.
Dati, Carlo, account of, i. 104; his

“tumid lapidary style,ibid.
Davenant, Sir William, Poet Laureate

in succession to Ben Jonson, i.
138 ; succeeded in that office by
Dryden, 359; Dryden's favourite
author, 439 ; Cowley's verses on,
44; Milton said to have befriended
him, 138; ridiculed in The Re-

hearsal, 387; account of, ibid.
Davideis, The, literary value of Cow-
ley's notes on, i, 44, 63; criticised,

.
56-64; imitated by Dryden, 57;
metre of, 72.

Davies, Sir John, Professor Masson's

note on his Nosce Teipsum, i. 298.
Deane, Thomas, one of Pope's in-

structors, üïi. 64.
Decay, intellectual, not universal in

old age, i. 295.
Decay, the world considered to be in

its, in Milton's time, i. 146.
Decimation of the Scots in Poland, i.

80; statute enforcing, 503; con-

sequences of, 510.
Decree of the Diet of Poland, i.

503; regarding Scotch pedlars,

506-507.
Dedications, Halifax “ fed with,” ii.

55.
Defensio pro populo Anglicano, Milton's

tract, i. 122.
De Guiana Epicum, poem probably

by Raleigh ascribed to Chapman,

i. 193.
Denham, Lady, i. 82.
Denham, Sir John, i. 77-89; Life,

77-83; his Works criticised, 83-
89; The dreamingest young
fellow,” 77 ; his “ Cooper's Hill ”
published just after the battle of
Edge Hill, 78; journey to Poland,
80; “ His eie of a strange piercing-
ness,"82; his anxiety to be thought
“a merry fellow," 83; his cha-
racter of a good translator, 84; the
author of local poetry, 85; compares
his poem to the flowing stream, 85;
his own translations, 86; examples
of “ the strength of Denham,” 87 ;
his “concatenated metre,” 88; imi.
tated by Lord Orrery, Garth, and

Pope, 84, 85.
Denmark, Molesworth's account of,

confuted by King, ii. 34.
Dennis, John, his abuse of Addison, ii.

110; his remarks on “Cato,” 136;
his criticism of Blackmore's poems,

1

Burnet, Bishop of Salisbury, i. 221;

his account of Waller in parlia-
ment, 277; ridiculed by Pope, iii.

113.
Burton, Dr. John, his denial of

Ducket's calumnious story, ii. 22.
Busby, Dr. Richard, i. 326; tutor

to Dryden, 352; his excellence as
a master, ii. 76; his care of his

scholars, 16, 33, 176.
Butler, Samuel, Life of, i. 199-204; his

works criticised, 206-215; his lam-
poon on Sir John Denham, 82;

Oldham's “complaint ” on, 205.
Button's, the coffee-house frequented

by Addison, ii. 126.

Castiglione, his Cortigiano called “the

Golden Book,” ii. 101.
Castle of Indolence, Thomson's poem,

Wordsworth’s praise of, iii. 250.
Cato, Addison's tragedy, ii. 106;

acted, 108; criticised, 110, 135-150;

translations of, 110.
Centos, Philips perhaps copied these

in the. “ Splendid Shilling,” i.

330.
Cibber, Colley,actor and poet laureate,

author of Apology, i. 424; his ac-
count of Dryden, 424; enthroned
in place of Theobald in the Dun-
ciad, iii. 143-145; his pamphlets
against Pope, 144, 146; violent

dispute between the two, 145.
Cibber's Lives of the Poets, the work of

Robert Shiels, ii. 303.
Cicero on the effect of Time, i. 212.
Cid, Corneille's, Addison's Cato com-

pared to, ii. 109.
Circumduction. This word used by

Johnson as if quoted from Hooker,

iii. 75.
City Mouse and Country Mouse, written

by Prior and Montague to ridicule
Dryden's “Hind and Panther," i.

399, 459; Pope on, ibid. ; ii. 176.
Chalfont, Milton at, during the plague,

i. 149.
Chandos, the duke of, Pope's treat-

ment of, iii. 120.
Chapman, George, his translation of

Homer, i. 287 ; iii. 88.
Characters and Manners of the Age,

Bruyère, ii. 102, 104.
Charles I., bust of, in Hammersmith

Church, i. 266.
Charles II., Dryden's intellectual

character of, more applicable to

himself, i. 433.
Charterhouse, Addison and Steele at

the, ii. 90.

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Cabinet Council, Raleigh's, published

by Milton, i. 134.
Caen, Protestant University at, 232.
Callières, François de, author of the

Hist. Poet. de la Guerre entre les

Anciens et les Modernes, iii. 12 n.
Cambridge, Milton at, i. 95-101 ;

Milton on his leaving, 98, 113.
Campaign, The, Addison's, ii. 97, 132-

135.
Captives, The, Gay's tragedy, ii.

262.
Carbury, Butler secretary to, i. 201.
Carmen Pindaricum in Theatrum Shel-

donianum, etc., i. 56.
Carmen Seculare, Prior's celebration

of King William, ii. 179.
Carmina Lyricorum, quoted, i. 54.
Carteret, Lord, an old friend of Swift's,

iii. 30.
Carvel, Hans, the origin of his Adven-

tures, ii. 193.
Caryl, Mr. Secretary, and his nephew

Pope's correspondent, iii. 178.
Casa, his Galateo, or Book of Manners,

ii. 181.
Casimir, Mathias, quoted, i. 54.

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Chaucer, his annuity signed at the

Savoy, i. 16; Pope's version of his
poems, iii. 66; a version of his
Prologues published by Pope under

the name of Betterton, 83.
Chertsey, Cowley's house there, i.

19.
Chester, Broome wrote under this

name, iii. 56.
Chevy Chuse, Addison's

poem,

ii.
151-2.
Chillingworth, account of this Roya-

list divine, i. 395.
Choice, The, Pomfret's, great popu-

larity of, i. 310.
Christian Doctrine, Milton's treatise

on, i. 161.

Christina, Queen, her commendation

of Milton's Defence of the People,

i. 124.
Chronicle, The, Cowley's poem ex-
tolled as a

dance of words,” an
“airy frolic of genius,” i. 44.
Clarendon, his promises to Butler, i.

202; Dryden's verses to, 443; tine
lines in these on active peace,
quoted, 444; his account of Waller,

282-84; of Granville, ii. 281.
Clarges, Sir Thomas, befriends Mil-

ton in Parliament, i. 138.
Clarke, Richard, Alderman, Chamber-

lain of London, the possessor of

Cowley's house at Chertsey, i. 21.
6 Classic ground.” This expression

first used by Addison, ii. 96.
Cleiveland, John, his fantastic lines

quoted, i. 32.
Cleland, a name adopted by Pope to

sign some of his apologetic letters,

iii. 119.
Clifford, Martin, his attack on Dry-

den, i. 370.
Coleridge, bis saying of Milton, i.

180.

“Collection, The late,” the edition of

the “ British Poets” published

1781, i. 8.
Collier, Jeremy, his censure of Dry-

den, i. 416; bis controversy with

the poets, ii. 211-213.
Collins, William, iii. 271-276.
Colonies, The, called Plantations,

origin of, i. 12.
Combat des Livres, from which John-

son thinks the idea of the Battle

of the Books was taken, iii. 12.
Comenius. His views on education

promulgated by Hartlib, i. 99.
Commonwealth, Milton's Readie and

Easie way to establish a Free, i. 135.
Comparison of great works, bow to

be effected, i. 469.
Compasses, Man and Wife compared

by Donne to a pair of, i. 41.
Complaint, The, the ode in which

Cowley styles himself “ the melan-

choly Cowley,” i. 18.
Composition, Addison's manner of,

ii. 125; different methods of, iii.

166; Pope's, ibid.
Comus, Milton's Masque, i. 101 ;

criticised, 171-172; played for the
benefit of Milton's granddaughter,

165.
“ Concatenated metre,” i. 88.
Conduct of the Allies, Swift's famous

political pamphlet, iii, 18, 19; ex-

traordinary sale of, 19.
Congreve, William, ii. 205-215; his

works criticised, 215-220; his ac-
count of Dryden, i. 411, 413; Pope

inscribed his Iliad to, iii. 157.
Coningsby, Earl, and Prior's arrest,

ii. 186.
Conquest of Granada, play by Dryden,

i. 369; Nell Gwynne in, ibid.
Contractions, Cowley's, i. 69.
Conversation, Pope on the charm of

Addison's, ii. 124; Savage's excel-

lence in, 417.
Cooper, Anthony Ashley, Earl of

Shaftesbury, i. 393.
Cooper, the miniature painter, a

friend of Butler's, i. 200.
Cooper's Hill, Denham's poem, i. 78,

84; quoted, 85; criticised, 36.
Corbet, Mrs., epitaph on, iii. 202-

203; the best of Pope's epitaphs,

203,
“ Corinna,” ('urll's, Mrs. Thomas, her

“ wild story” of Dryden's funeral,

i. 406.
Coriolanus, a tragedy by Thomson,

performed after his death for the

benefit of his family, iii. 231.
Coronation, Dryden's poem on the,

quoted, i. 442.
('otton, Ann, wife of Sir J. Denbam,

i. 78.
Couplet, Pope's favourite, iii. 192.
Courage rightly successful. Dryden

" the brave bold man,” i. 475.
Coverley, Sir Roger de, Addison's

conception of, ii. 105.
('oward. Rochester's saying, “Every-

one would be a coward if he durst,"

i. 924.
C'owley, Abraham, Life of, i. 1-21;

his genius and character, 22-27;
critical remarks on his works, 27-
73; birth, 3; education, 4-6; pre-
cocity, 5; Comedies, 6, 7, 17;
Davideis written, 6; criticised, 56-
64; ejected from Cambridge he
retreats to Oxford, 7; follows the
Queen to Paris, 8; The Mistress
published, 8; criticised, 48; Let-
ters, 10; consults the Virgilian
lots, 11; thinks of retiring to
America, 12; becomes a physician,
13, 15; assists at commencement
of Royal Society, 13; Latin poems,

15, 16; calls himself “the Melan-
choly Cowley,” 18; introduced
into the Session of the Poets, 18;
house in Chertsey, 19, 20; death,
21; portraits of, 5, 21; his proposi-
tion for the advancement of ex-
perimental philosophy, 109; could
have made his name illustrious
merely by his learning, 431; Den-
ham's poem on the death of, 83,
87; his Will, 501; leaves his

books to Sprat, 502.
Cowper, quoted on the music of

Paradise Lost, i. 194.
Cradock, Dr. Zachary, his famous
sermon,

i. 279.
Craggs, James, the friend of Addi.

son, Pope, and Gay, ii. 122 ;
Secretary of State, 247 ; his pro-
posal to obtain a pension for
Pope, iii. 91 ; Pope's epitaph on,

200-201.
Crashaw, addresses Cowley on the

appearance of Poetical Blossoms, i.
5; Cowley's verses on his death

one of the best of his poems, 46.
Crawley, Francis, Judge. Waller's

speech on his impeachment, i. 260.
Creation, Blackmore's fine philosophi-

cal poem, ii. 228, 240.
Credulity, Juvenal's saying, “ there

is nothing a man will not believe

in his own favour,” ui, 120.
Creechy, Thomas, his translation of

Juvenal, i. 463.
Crispe, Sir Nicholas, his design to

assist the king, i. 266, 267.
Critic, Addison considered as a, ü.

150-152.
Criticism, improvement in since

Addison's time, i. 177; instance of
sagacious, 332; Dryden the Father
of English, 495; Pope's willing-
ness to listen to, iii. 167,

on

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