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1883.

Lift the Standard Higher. There is very much need of it, all along the line. Even they, to whom the outlook is rosiest, if they stop to take in the facts, will have to allow that we are but half awake to the

grandeur of our opportunities and the pressing calls of an awakening world. We get our solace in what the Church is doing, largely by comparison with other days when activity was less-though perhaps the witness of a true life was not rather than by comparison with New Testament ideals and the prophecies of either Testament. We can ill bear the test they bring to us, and there is ample opportunity for a grand advance quite within the limits of our ability.

And to this we are summoned by a harvest broader and whiter than

men.

ever lay before any generation of Besides the old fields which offer to labor richer rewards than ever before, are new fields where foundations are to be laid and openings are to be entered, as inviting as any the fathers' took possession of

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on the other. As a British posses- assuredly take advantage of any prosion this appeals more loudly to the crastination. English than to the American Churches; but such an opportunity presents itself as few capable young men and women will ever find, aside from this.

To such an advance are we held responsible by the simplest but most cogent of all arguments, the fact of ample ability. No generation ever had such tools to work with, such plethora of resources, so many sons and daughters who could be spared with no detriment to any great home interest whatever. These are stubborn facts, but one by one they with them a tremendous pressure; for only he who does as well as he can, and makes his achievement commensurate with ability, can be said to have reached the full measure

carry

of duty.

Every loyal heart must wish to see 1883 stand out as the grandest year of the Christian Era, thus far, for the Kingdom of the Truth. Everybody must confess that it lies clearly within the power of the Church to make it so. Shall we arise, and say, By the grace of God, it

in the name of the Lord. The great shall be so? continent of Africa looms up before us, set now in the focal light of the 19th century civilization. The Church must be vigilant and active if she keep up with the strides of commercial enterprises, and in no other way can she wisely occupy the field. To follow after at any is to leave time for the enemy to fill the already possessed mind of savage man, with evil set on fire from the refinements of iniquity which curse our civilization

great distance

and darken its otherwise brilliant horizons. There is South America full of darkness, bigotry and moral impotence—one of the hardest fields to be won from the arch enemy, because of the fetters of the Papacy on the limbs of moral decrepitude and

baseness.

And as sketched in the Church Missionary Intelligencer, it looks as if, of all unoccupied fields, none is comparable to Aden, as a centre for reaching Mohammedans on the one hand and interesting African tribes

Begin Right.

The only way to make the New Year, in the greatest measure, conducive to the glory of our King is to make the first week so; and then the next. Every week let slip unimproved is so much lost to the year's bright record. Once gone, its flight is ever away into the deep shades of the past-it cannot be recovered. When this issue reaches its destination the reader will have spent the

first week of the New Year. If the fifty-two were to go like the first, would that bring you to the end with exultation in view of a year filled full of service and life, influence and wealth, consecrated to the Lord's work? You have looked into your affairs, and perhaps you find that 1882 was a very prosperous year, and the Lord has not had His due of all your increase. Too soon you cannot pay Him what thou owest. There is a danger in delaying to pay the Lord His dues. The devil will

Possibly you are saying "1882 was a lean year for me." It is well to inquire why. Were the motives and aims of your heart such as to enlist the Lord on your side? If you had been prospered, by how] much would the world have been advantaged? Who would have been the better for it? What life would have been sweetened and cheered by it? Something may be gained by an honest and impartial inquiry into the springs of action, so to begin the New Year aright. Now to begin; Now to begin aright.

Just now the people of God are beWhat shall be the outcome of this? ginning "the Week of Prayer." How are we approaching it? What room in our plans are we making for it? What room in our hearts? "Ac

cording to your faith be it unto you," said One who never trifled with the hopes or fears of men.

On that level of measurement what are we expectthe world is to be blessed only in that ing? What is our faith equal to ? If the world is to be blessed only in that degree, what is the outlook for the

world? We may well pray, "Increase our faith," for, if our faith was only commensurate with the Divine willingness and the Divine ability to bless, all the windows of heaven would be open, and the world's thirsty fields would rejoice in the abundance of rain. And can unbelief keep those windows shut? Certainly, as concerns our own fleece it shall go unwet, even by the dews of heaven, if we are unbelieving; and, unbelieving, we can do nothing to call down blessings on the needy world. Away then with unbelief, at the threshold of the year, at the dawning of the Week of Prayer, Assure thy heart that God is, and that He is the rewarder of them who diligently seek Him. Then think what a God He is, and ask with a largeness of petition that will honor His infinite willingness to do great things, for the glory of His Name

and His Church.

In one of Dr. Maclaren's admirable sermons he thus boldly sketches one of the enemies of our faith.

Though spoken to English ears, the message is just as good, just as fit ting, to ours:

"All our activity in spreading the Gospel, whether by personal effort or by our gifts, like every form of outward action, tends to become mechanical, and to lose its connection with the motion which originated it.

* We may easily become so occupied with the mere external occupation as to be quite unconscious that it has ceased to be faithful work, and has become routine, dull mechanism, or the result of confidence, not in Christ, whose power once flowed through as, but in ourselves the doers. * * * How widely this foe to our faith operates amid the multiplied activities of this busy age one trembles to think. We see all around us a Church toiling with unexampled expenditure of wealth, and effort, and time. It is difficult to repress the suspicion that the work is out of proportion to the life. Ah, brethren, how much of all this energy of effort, so admirable in many respecte, will He whose fan is in His hand accept as true service-how much of it will be wheat for the garner, how much chaff for the fire? It is not for us to divide between the two, but it is for us to remember that it is not impossible to make of our labors the most dangerous enemy to the depth of our still life hidden with Christ in God, and that every deed of apparent service which is not the real issue of living faith is powerless for good to others, and heavy with hurt to ourselves. Brethren and Fathers in the ministry! how many of us know what it is to talk and toil away our early devotion; and all at once to discover that for years perhaps we have been preaching and laboring, from mere habit and routine, like corpses galvanized into some ghastly and transient caricature of life. Christian men and women, beware lest this great enterprise of missions, which our fathers began from the holiest motives and in the simplest faith, be wrenched away from its only true basis, and be done with languid expectation and more languid desires of success, from no higher motive

than that we found it in existence, and have become accustomed to carry it on. If that be our reason, then we harm ourselves, and mask from our own sight our own unbelief."

We commend these words to serious thought, and take them home to our own soul.

A FEARFUL LAPSE.

A man of great wealth is reported to have said, in refusing aid to foreign missionary work, "The very wealthy cannot aid you, as each one is struggling to amass greater wealth and to double as soon as possible his vast possessions." That is a startling confession for a disciple of the Lord to make. In the face of the terrible warnings of the New Testament against the love of money, the haste to be rich, the hazard of great accumulations as blocking the way of entrance to His kingdom,this man dares to pursue a course which utterly ignores them all, and then, on the ground of it, excuses himself for disobedience to the Lord's command, and is yet a disciple in good standing! And is he alone, or this perilous folly contagious? The disciple worth a million is in haste to make a million more, and cannot stop to hear the Master say: "Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness," but is playing the part of the rich fool whose summary end left his great accumulations to those who were to come after him be they wise men or fools.

This man is so eager for other millions, in the mad rivalry of millionaires, that he cannot stop to lis ten to the cry of earth's millions, concerning whom it is said. "He shall have the uttermost part of the earth for his possession," nor to ask himself whether it be in his power to shorten the travail of Christ's soul and hasten the day when it shall be said, "He is satisfied.”

clue to the conduct of not a few of whom we know, who in one way or another show an insane passion for money making, and a no less insane determination to gratify, at any expense, every whim or fancy of their brain, in a rivalry of display which is only possible to such as have in their possession as a trust from God, vast accumulations of money! For all such will ever do, the world will move on through the ages the greater half of its population without a knowledge of the true God and eternal life! And is this discipleship to Him of whom it is said, "If ye have not His spirit ye are none of His?

OUR MAGAZINE FOR 1883. Some weeks since we published a list of subjects which we proposed considering during the present year, and invited suggestions from others.

After a careful consideration of the suggestions received and a study of what will be of the greatest benefit to our subscribers we decide as follows:

The monthly issue of GOSPEL IN ALL LANDS (the weekly issues bound together) will be discontinued. Less than one hundred and fifty have asked for it for 1882, and the binding and the sending out of these few copies have cost us more than we have received from the subscribers. Some of the subscribers to the "Monthly" have expressed a desire to change to the "Weekly" for 1883, and it would be necessary to charge $3.00 for the "Monthly" if it should be continued.

The weekly issue will be the same size as during the past year. We have been urged to decrease the size of the page, increase the number of pages, and issue monthly, upon the ground that the smaller page would make it better for binding and that the monthly issue would be sufficient. This would lighten our work, and we are ready to do it whenever we are satisfied that our subscribers prefer the change. As far as we have been able to ascertain the larger number prefer the present style.

All the satisfaction we get in thinking of the many stewards of God, who have learned better the lesson of the gospel, can lessen the sadness occasioned by one such case as this. And what if they be many? If we mistake not, this gives us a As to the list of subjects published

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1883.

Lift the Standard Higher. There is very much need of it, all along the line. Even they, to whom the outlook is rosiest, if they stop to take in the facts, will have to allow that we are but half awake to the

grandeur of our opportunities and the pressing calls of an awakening world. We get our solace in what the Church is doing, largely by comparison with other days when activity was less-though perhaps the witness of a true life was not-rather than by comparison with New Testament ideals and the prophecies of either Testament. We can ill bear the test they bring to us, and there is ample opportunity for a grand advance quite within the limits of our ability.

And to this we are summoned by a harvest broader and whiter than

men.

The

ever lay before any generation of Besides the old fields which offer to labor richer rewards than ever before, are new fields where foundations are to be laid and openings are to be entered, as inviting as any the fathers' took possession of in the name of the Lord. The great continent of Africa looms up before us, set now in the focal light of the 19th century civilization. Church must be vigilant and active if she keep up with the strides of commercial enterprises, and in no other way can she wisely occupy the field. To follow after at any great distance is to leave time for the enemy to fill the already possessed mind of savage man, with evil set on fire from the refinements of iniquity which curse our civilization and darken its otherwise brilliant horizons. There is South America full of darkness, bigotry and moral impotence one of the hardest fields to be won from the arch enemy, because of the fetters of the Papacy on the limbs of moral decrepitude and baseness.

And as sketched in the Church Missionary Intelligencer, it looks as if, of all unoccupied fields, none is comparable to Aden, as a centre for reaching Mohammedans on the one hand and interesting African tribes

on the other. As a British posses- assuredly take advantage of any sion this appeals more loudly to the crastination. English than to the American. Possibly you are saying "1 Churches; but such an opportunity was a lean year for me." It is presents itself as few capable young to inquire why. Were the moti men and women will ever find, aside and aims of your heart such as to from this. list the Lord on your side? If had been prospered, by how) m would the world have been ad taged? Who would have been better for it? What life would! been sweetened and cheered by Something may be gained by an est and impartial inquiry into springs of action, so to begin New Year aright. Now to be Now to begin ARIGHT.

To such an advance are we held responsible by the simplest but most cogent of all arguments, the fact of ample ability. No generation ever had such tools to work with, such plethora of resources, so many sons and daughters who could be spared with no detriment to any great home interest whatever. These are stubborn facts, but one by one they with them a tremendous pressure; for only he who does as well as he can, and makes his achievement commensurate with ability, can be said to have reached the full measure of duty.

carry

Every loyal heart must wish to see 1883 stand out as the grandest year of the Christian Era, thus far, for the Kingdom of the Truth. Everybody must confess that it lies clearly within the power of the Church to make it so. Shall we arise, and say, By the grace of God, it shall be so?

The only way to make the New Year, in the greatest measure, conducive to the glory of our King is to make the first week so; and then the next. Every week let slip unimproved is so much lost to the year's bright record. Once gone, its flight is ever away into the deep shades of the past-it cannot be recovered. When this issue reaches its destination the reader will have spent the first week of the New Year. If the fifty-two were to go like the first, would that bring you to the end with exultation in view of a year filled full of service and life, influence and wealth, consecrated to the Lord's

Just now the people of God ar What shall be the outcome of ginning "the Week of Pra How are we approaching it? W room in our plans are we making it? What room in our hearts?

cording to your faith be it unto y said One who never trifled wit hopes or fears of men. On that hopes or fears of men. On that

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