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6. ADDISON.

272. Letters from Cleanthes on a mischiefmaking

old Maid--from E. G. on Kissing-Hoods STEELE.

273. Criticism on Paradise Lost .

ADDISON.

274. On Seducers—Procuresses-Letter from one STEELE.

275. Dissection of a Beau's Head

ADDISON.

276. Letters on Delicacy in the Censure of Vices

--from an affected Lady—a Kept Mis-

tress-a Quaker ..

... STEELE.

277. Remarks and Letters on French Fashions .. BUDGELL.

278. Letters from a Shopkeeper on his Wife's

Greek-Private Marriage---Musical Plan STEELE.

279. Criticism on Paradise Lost

ADDISON.

280. On the Desire of pleasing—Character of

Polycarpus

STEELE.

281. Dissection of a Coquette's Heart

ADDISON.

282. False-Hopes-decorating Churches with

Evergreens

STEELE.

283. On the Art of growing rich

BUDGELL.

284. Affectation of Negligence--of Business-

Letter from the Parish Clerk on Ever.

greens

STEELE.

285. Criticism on Paradise Lost

ADDISON,

286. False delicacy-Defence of the Spectator's

Censure of Public Vices-Complexions UNKNOWN.

287. On the Civil Constitution of Great Britain Addison.

288. Description of Male Jilts

STEELE.

Letter from an Author turned Dealer MOTTEUX.

289. Reflections on Bills of Mortality-Story of
a Dervise

ADDISON.

1

290. Tragedy of the Distressed Mother-Letter

from Sophia in love with a short Face STEELE.
291. Criticism on Paradise Lost

ADDISON
292. On the Art of bestowing Favourso--Letter

of Pliny-Letter from a poor and proud
Jezabel.

UNKNOWN.
29 . Connexion betwixt Prudence and good For-

tune-Fable of a Drop in the Ocean • ADDISON.
294. On want of Charity in the Wealthy-Cha-
rity Schools

STEELE.
295. Letter on Pin-Money-Reflections on that
Custom

ADDISON.
296. Letters on Greek Mottos---the Use of the

Window --soliciting Advice--Lampoons
--Good Manners Dancing

STEELE.
997. Criticism on Paradise Lost ..

ADDISON.
298. Letter on the general Notion Men have of
the Fair Sex

STEELE.
199. Letter from Sir John Envil, married to a
Woman of Quality.

ADDISON.
300. Indelicate Conversation-Conversation with

the Fair Sexo-Inconstancy of Friend-
ship-Criticism

STEELE.
301. Letter to Chloe from her Lover, with an
Account of his Dreams

BUDGELL.
302. Character of Emilia

DR. BROME.
303. Criticism on Paradise Lost

ADDISON.
304. Letter from a silent Lover-Petition of An-

thony Titlepage-of Barth. Lady-love STEELE.
305. Project of the French Political Academy ADDISON
306. Letter from a Beauty destroyed by the
Small-Pox

HUGHES.
Consolation offered

STEELE.
307. On the Education of Children

BUDGELL.
308. On the better regulating of Matches-

Tradesman married to a Woman of Qual-
ity--op the Historians, &c.

STEELE.

309. Criticism on Paradise Lost .

ADDISON.
-310. Letters from various Lovers--on Tale-bear-

ers-Petition from the Readers of the
Spectator

STEELE.

THE

SPECTATOR.

No. 254. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1711.

Σεμνός έρως αρετής, ο δε κυπρίνος άχος οφέλλει. 'Virtuous love is honou ble, but lust increaseth sorrow.

WHEN I consider the false impressions which are received by the generality of the world, I am troubled at none more than at a certain levity of thought, which many young women of quality have entertained, to the hazard of their characters, and certain misfortune of their lives. The first of the following letters may best represent the faults I would now point at, and the answer to it, the temper of mind in a contrary character.

MY DEAR HARRIOT,

If thou art she, but oh how fallen, how changed, what an apostate! how lost to all that is gay and agreeable! To be married I find is to be buried alive; I cannot conceive it more dismal to be shut up in a vault to converse with the shades of my ancestors, than to be carried down to an old manor house in the country, and confi

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ned to the conversation of a sober husband, and an awkward chambermaid. For variety I suppose you may entertain yourself with madam in her grogram gown, the spouse of your parish vicar, who has by this time, I am sure, well furnished you with receipts for making salves and possets, distilling cordial waters, making syrups, and applying poultices.

Blest solitude! I wish thee joy, my dear, of thy loved retirement, which indeed you would persuade me is very agreeable, and different enough from what I have here described : but, child, I am afraid thy brains are a little disordered with romances and novels. After six months marriage to hear thee talk of love, and paint the country scenes so softly, is a little extravagant; one would think you lived the lives of sylvan deities, or roved among the walks of paradise, like the first happy pair. But pray thee leave these whimsies, and come to town in order to live, and talk like other mortals. However, as I am extremely interested in your reputation, I would willingly give you a little good advice at your first appearance under the character of a married woman. It is a little insolent in me, perhaps, to advise a matron; but I am so afraid you will make so silly a figure as a fond wife, that I cannot help warning you not to appear in any public places with your husband, and never to saunter about St. James's Park together: if you presume to enter the ring at Hyde Park together, you are ruined for ever; nor must you take the least notice of one another at the play-house, or opera, unless you would be laughed at for a very loving couple, most happily paired in the yoke of wedlock. I would recommend the example of an acquaintance of ours to your imitation ; she is the most negligent and

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